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Stop Procrastinating by "Clearing to Neutral"

Stop Procrastinating by "Clearing to Neutral"
By Thanh Pham We often procrastinate because there is this one hidden thing holding us back. It is this one thing that makes you procrastinate and most people are not even aware what this is, but if you eliminate it you can say goodbye to procrastination forever. Friction A lot of times we procrastinate because we have to jump through a lot of hurdles before we can do the thing we actually want to do. For example, let’s say you need to prepare dinner. To put it in other words, before you can do your main activity (cooking), you have to all these others things (cleaning) before you can get to your main activity. If you make it hard for yourself to get started, that’s when you will most likely procrastinate. Now imagine you actually cleaned your desk and now you need to do some work on your computer. All these little starting points where you have friction are very common. Now this is where, as we at Asian Efficiency like to call it, the habit of Clearing To Neutral (CTN) comes in.

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