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Responsive Navigation: Optimizing for Touch Across Devices

Responsive Navigation: Optimizing for Touch Across Devices
As more diverse devices embrace touch as a primary input method, it may be time to revisit navigation standards on the Web. How can a navigation menu be designed to work across a wide range of touch screen sizes? In these demos, Jason Weaver and I decided to find out. The Demos Why do these navigation menus work across a wide range of touch screen sizes? Why do we care about touch across a wide range of screen sizes? Across Screen Sizes First, why do we care about touch across a wide range of screen sizes? Tablets are no different. And the very notion of what defines a tablet is being challenged by laptop/tablet convertibles and touch-enabled Ultrabooks. Even beyond 13 inches, touch and gesture interfaces are possible. Accounting For Touch So what does it mean to consider touch across all screen sizes? Touch target sizes are relatively easy: just make things big enough to prevent accidental taps and errors. These common patterns of posture create easy to hit and hard to reach touch areas.

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Trimming the Fat — Paul Robert Lloyd When I unveiled a new version of this site last year, I hoped the design would slowly evolve. An update in February improved the responsive layout and saw some initial performance optimisations. The last few weeks have seen further iteration. Although the design looks remarkably similar, much has changed below the surface. Touch Target Sizes People interact with touch-based user interfaces with their fingers. So user interface controls have to be big enough to capture fingertip actions without frustrating users with erroneous actions and tiny targets. Ok, so how big?

Introduction to Mystery Meat Navigation Wikipedia's defilnition (partial): MMN is very seductive — it looks cool and it's used on sites that win design awards. Because there's no long strings of text, MMN makes the page look "cleaner" because there's more white space. Responsive Menu Concepts The following is a guest post by Tim Pietrusky. I know Tim from his prolific work on CodePen and from being a helpful community member there. He wrote to me with this guest post about responsive menus which I'm more than happy to share with you below. Futurico User Interface Pro on the Behance Network Futurico UI Pro is the world’s biggest user interface elements pack. It contains more than 200 web design elements that can be used in any project no matter the style or the concept. The pack contains a set of elements added in one extraordinary collection and the good thing is that you can use them for any design or application. All the elements from this pack are editable and available in PSD (fully layered), hence they can be easily integrated in any concept or design. This archive provides 3 sets of elements in different colors and 2 examples of web design where they have been used. You will get a better idea on how a single UI Kit can help you create plenty of different designs.

How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices? For years, I’ve been referring to my own research and observations on mobile device use, which indicate that people grasp their mobile phones in many ways—not always one handed. But some of my data was getting very old, so included a lot of information about hardware input methods using keyboard- and keypad-driven devices that accommodate the limited reach of fingers or thumbs. These old mobile phones differ greatly from the touchscreen devices that many are now using. Modern Mobile Phones Are Different Adaptive Vs. Responsive Layouts And Optimal Form Field Labels Advertisement Editor’s note: Welcome to a new column in the UX Design section on Smashing Magazine! Each month we’ll pick a handful of popular questions asked by our readers around good practices in designing smart and usable experiences. They will be answered by Christian Holst1, a regular author here on Smashing and founder of Baymard Institute2.

Operating System Interface Design Between 1981-2009 A Graphical User Interface (GUI for short) allows users to interact with the computer hardware in a user friendly way. Over the years a range of GUI’s have been developed for different operating systems such as OS/2, Macintosh, Windowsamiga, Linux, Symbian OS, and more. We’ll be taking a look at the evolution of the interface designs of the major operating systems since the 80′s. I should mention that this article showcases only the significant advances in GUI design (not operating system advances) and also not all of the graphical user interfaces and operating systems existing today. The first GUI was developed by researchers at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) in the ’70s.

How to design for thumbs in the Era of Huge Screens - Scott Hurff After years of resistance, Apple’s iPhone 6 announcement last week officially signaled the Dawn of the Era of Huge Screens. And it’s going to crash into existence in a big way. Just this Monday, Apple announced that they’d sold over four million pre-orders for the phones the opening night of pre-orders. In only one night, they sold almost half of what they sold the entire opening weekend last year for iPhone 5s and 5c. So it’s looking like the 3.5” and 4” screens of yore will start their inevitable decline very quickly. That means that those of us who’ve gotten comfortable building apps, responsive sites and mobile-optimized web views with the old ways in mind have some learning to do (myself included).

What's Wrong with the iOS 7 Icons? by Ian Storm Taylor “It looks childish.” That was the first reaction I heard to iOS 7. I’m not going to lie, when I saw it for the first time myself, I freaked out a little too. Like any good simplicity-loving designer, I was eagerly waiting for Jonathan Ive to reveal a fresh, clean take on iOS. But the icons that were unveiled feel rushed. Lots of them look like the very first sketch was thrown right into the keynote.

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