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The Rijksmuseum Puts 125,000 Dutch Masterpieces Online, and Lets You Remix Its Art

The Rijksmuseum Puts 125,000 Dutch Masterpieces Online, and Lets You Remix Its Art
The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam is one of the grand European museums. Home to many of the Dutch masters (Rembrandt’s Night Watch, which seems to glow from its center, and Vermeer’s Milkmaid, to name just a few), the museum is located on the city’s Museumplein, surrounded by the smaller Vincent Van Gogh museum and modern Stedelijk. All those masterpieces are now available for close-up view online at the Rijksmuseum’s digitized collection. But the Dutch are a whimsical people, so it seems right that, in digitizing its collection, the museum went a step further than further. By visiting the museum’s Rijksstudio, art lovers can create their own “sets” of Rijksmuseum works. All of this can be done with the blessings and support of the museum, which provides links to sites that offer various forms of printing on demand. What better way to make the collection accessible to the public? Related Content: Rembrandt’s Facebook Timeline Google “Art Project” Brings Great Paintings & Museums to You

Read 700 Free eBooks Made Available by the University of California Press The University of California Press e-books collection holds books published by UCP (and a select few printed by other academic presses) between 1982-2004. The general public currently has access to 770 books through this initiative. The collection is dynamic, with new titles being added over time. Readers looking to see what the collection holds can browse by subject. The curators of the site have kindly provided a second browsing page that shows only the publicly accessible books, omitting any frustrating off-limits titles. The collection’s strengths are in history (particularly American history and the history of California and the West); religion; literary studies; and international studies (with strong selections of Middle Eastern Studies, Asian Studies, and French Studies titles). Sadly, you can’t download the books to an e-reader or tablet. Rebecca Onion is a writer and academic living in Philadelphia. Related Content: 30 Free Essays & Stories by David Foster Wallace on the Web

The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix Earlier this week, Oxford's Bodleian Library announced that it had digitized a 550 year old copy of the Gutenberg Bible along with a number of other ancient bibles, some of them quite beautiful. Not to be outdone, the British Library came out with its own announcement on Thursday: We have released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose. The librarians behind the project freely admit that they don't exactly have a great handle on the images in the collection. You can jump into the entire collection here, or view a set of highlights here. To learn more about this British Library initiative, read this other Open Culture post which takes a deeper dive into the image collection. Related Content: The Rijksmuseum Puts 125,000 Dutch Masterpieces Online, and Lets You Remix Its Art The Getty Puts 4600 Art Images Into the Public Domain (and There’s More to Come) The Digital Public Library of America Launches Today, Opening Up Knowledge for All

Open Access Journals Search Engine (OAJSE) Little Bird Tales - Home Student Discovery Sets - For Teachers The new Library of Congress Student Discovery Sets bring together historical artifacts and one-of-a-kind documents on a wide range of topics, from history to science to literature. Interactive tools let students zoom in, draw to highlight details, and conduct open-ended primary source analysis. Full teaching resources are available for each set. Children's Lives at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Children of a century past: How were their lives different from today's? The Constitution The drafts and debates that brought the Constitution and the Bill of Rights into being, including notes by the documents' framers. The Dust Bowl Songs, maps, and iconic photographs document the daily ordeals of rural migrant families during a disastrous decade. The Harlem Renaissance Discover some of the innovative thinkers and creative works that contributed to the cultural movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. Immigration The Industrial Revolution The U.S.' Japanese American Internment The New Deal

A Free Comprehensive Digital Library Packed Full of Resources for Teachers July 15, 2014 The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is an all-digital library that aggregates metadata — or information describing an item — and thumbnails for more than 7 million photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds, moving images, and more from libraries, archives, and museums around the ​united ​states.The Digital Public Library of America brings together the riches of America’s libraries, archives, and museums, and makes them freely available to the world. DPLA is much more than a search engine, it is a portal that provides innovative ways to search and scan through the united collection of millions of items, including by timeline, map, virtual bookshelf, format, subject, and partner. The Digital Public Library of America also enables new and transformative uses of our digitized cultural heritage through the use of an application programming interface (API) and maximally open data. Watch the video below to learn more about The Digital Public Library of America.

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