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The Photo Ark - Joel Sartore

The Photo Ark - Joel Sartore
For many of Earth’s creatures, time is running out. Half of the world’s plant and animal species will soon be threatened with extinction. The goal of the Photo Ark is to document biodiversity, show what’s at stake and to get people to care while there’s still time. More than 3,200 species have been photographed to date, with more to come. Click here to learn more about the Photo Ark and how buying a print can help. Click here to see behind the scenes with a clip on the project from NBC Nightly News. An endangered Indain rhinoceros female with calf (Rhinoceros unicornis) at the Fort Worth Zoo. Images in this gallery

http://www.joelsartore.com/galleries/the-photo-ark/

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