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By Marina Bychkova

By Marina Bychkova

http://www.enchanteddoll.com/

Related:  КУКЛЫ

The magic of Lidia Snul, Russian BJD Artist (Part 2) In the second part of our interview with Lidia Snul, Lidia tells us about her plans to create an older BJD, maybe a boy BJD, and the “birth” of Ophelia and Croby. BJDmagazine: Do you think of creating dolls with older features? Lidia: Yes, I have a project “Ice Queen” – an older woman, well preserved in a cool and dry place. Right now she is in the stage of a master-model, I’ve been planning to make molds of her for a long time, but I have many other orders to work on. This is my Mermaid.

15 Amazing Animated Short films We all love short animated films, but creating short film is very hard task. Putting whole story in 5 to 10 minutes is not easy. Can you imagine? Few films produced after working hard more than 6 years! The Tire Art of Wim Delvoye For his series titled "Pneu", Belgian artist Wim Delvoye created a series of decorative objects by hand-carving intricate patterns and floral motifs on used car tires. Through his manipulation of found objects, Delvoye transforms things that seem useful in everyday life into sculptural pieces that carry a different value from their original intended purpose. Delvoye calls his own approach to art ‘glocal’, referring to ‘local’ and ‘global’, which is his own ironical way of describing art.

Enchanted Doll » Blog Archive » The Birth of Ruby- Greenware Cleaning Soft-fired doll parts have been laid out in front of me for quite some time now and my desk is all set up for cleaning. Water bucket – check, sanding sponges – check, an assortment of various tools – also check. Still, I sit there, eyeing the parts through squinted eyes like they are my mortal enemies, challenging them to either get the hell out of my sight or clean themselves for once. I catch myself sighing with resignation for the fourth time as I anticipate the mind-numbing repetitiveness and inevitable length of the upcoming cleaning session, pick up a tiny hand and place it in the hot water. I procrastinate some more by watching a stream of air-bubbles emerge from it as sinks and think of how I always start with a hand for some reason. What a creature of habit.

Marlaine Verhelst Thank you for taking the time to visit my blog! Take a second to peek around and check out some of my previous posts. Of course, I would love to find out what you think as well, so make sure to comment. See you around! More ... Russian Svetlana Pchelnikova has published a brand new book about male figures in Doll Art. Legend of Zelda Treasure chest with sound! 1/4" Pine plywood. You can use whatever type of wood you want, but pine looks nice and is relatively cheap. You'll need enough wood to cut out the following pieces: Two 5.5" x 10.5" pieces One 8" x 10.5" base piece Two 8.5 x 5.5" pieces Five 2 7/16" x 11" slats Also you will need two 6 sided half a decagon pieces. This sounds confusing but I've included a template to cut these pieces out. Print the template out and cut the pieces to be 8" wide at the base.

Sculptures Popping Out of Paintings Oh, to have been in Tokyo in June! Shintaro Ohata just finished up a solo exhibition at the Yukari Art Contemprary in Tokyo, Japan. This Hiroshima, Japan-born artist is known for his ability to show us everyday life in a cinematic way. He captures light in his paintings, showering the world, as we know it, with carefully placed strokes of it. "Every ordinary scenery in our daily lives, such as the rising sun, the beauty of a sunset or a glittering road paved with asphalt on a rainy night, becomes something irreplaceable if we think we wouldn’t be able to see them anymore," he told Yukari gallery. Geisha doll artist LiQuaChe' can be purchased over the Internet at: www.nationalartcraft.com There are also detailed instructions on the website for how to make dolls using LiQuaChe'. I use the same plaster molds that I use for porcelain. The same molds can be used for both.

The Skeleton Lake of Roopkund, India located in Trisul, India In 1942 a British forest guard in Roopkund, India made an alarming discovery. Some 16,000 feet above sea level, at the bottom of a small valley, was a frozen lake absolutely full of skeletons. That summer, the ice melting revealed even more skeletal remains, floating in the water and lying haphazardly around the lake’s edges.

Related:  BJD