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Dystopian Writing Prompts

Dystopian Writing Prompts
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Writer’s Digest - Writing Prompts Write a scene that includes a character speaking a different language, speaking in a thick accent, or otherwise speaking in a way that is unintelligibe to the other characters. (Note: You don't necessarily need to know the language the character is speaking—be creative with it!) Describe a character's reaction to something without explaining what it is. See if your fellow prompt responders can guess what it is. Write a story or a scene about one character playing a prank on another. Describe the scene from both characters' points of view. Writing Prompt: Write a story that involves confusion over homonyms (words that have the same spelling but different meanings) or homophones (words that sound the same but are spelled differently). For World Storytelling Day, share the best story you've ever heard or told by word of mouth, or have a fictional character recount their favorite story. You're making your way down a cobbled street when a stocky, red-bearded man beckons you into an alley.

Creative Writing Exercises: Make a Book Journal and Fill it with Discoveries! You need more than a beginning if you’re going to start a book. If all you have is a beginning, then once you’ve written that beginning, you have nowhere to go. – Neil Gaiman Do you ever get stuck writing and you’re not sure where to go? Or stalled out in the midst of a writing project? If you’re looking for creative writing prompts that are specific to your work in progress, read on! Even if I think through the major parts of my WIP (work in progress), I sometimes find myself in need of additional inspiration and writing ideas. In addition to collecting photos, snippets of ideas, sketches and maps of my fictional towns in my journal, I use writing exercises to get me going. Listen to your character: I ask a specific character how he or she feels about what happened in the last scene. If you are really feeling brave and want to walk a mile in your character’s shoes, answer out loud in her/his voice. Character monologue: now it’s really time to be brave.

Dystopia Dystopian fiction is really hot right now. Just look at The Hunger Games, The Maze Runner, The Uglies trilogy and more. The New York Times had a discussion where authors and other professionals chimed in on the popularity of the dystopian genre and tried to understand why young adults specifically are so drawn to it. What exactly is dystopian? Dystopia, according to Merriam Webster, means an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives. It’s the anti-utopia, the anti amazing heavenly paradise. Stories in the dystopia genre are dark, conflict-driven and usually take place sometime in the future after something horrible has happened to the Earth whether through an apocalypse, government takeover, war, drought etc. Coming up with the back story in a dystopian novel is where a writer can be truly inventive in social commentary and criticism. My favorite contemporary dystopian novel is The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins, which I’m on book 2 of. Get writing!

Daily Writing Tips Tips And Tricks For Writing So what do you do when you’re pressed for time, swamped under works and you still need to get some stuff written, and written well? Your nerves are tightened up so well that you can’t sleep, but you can’t squeeze even a sentence out of your mind. I know the feeling so well, but what I did then was, just start writing fast without even thinking, then a professional article was born with the time shorter than usual. (Image Source: Fotolia) The phenomena has nothing to do with the God I worship, or any supernatural phenomenon, it’s just how brain works: we write fast and professionally if we can just limit something, abandon certain habits, and put up some beneficial habits. Articles you might be interested as well: 1. To be honest, I hate this method. (Image Source: Fotolia) If you’re pressed for time and really want get some writing done, open up a fresh Microsoft Word document, and start typing. 2. I know a lot of people who don’t like setting a timer and writing till it goes off. 3. 4.

50 of the Best Websites for Writers There are tons of reference sites on the web that can help you find a job or write a poem, essay or story. Here is a list of the best 50 websites for writers. Reference Websites Merriam-Webster Online - Merriam Webster is the perfect place to look up words and find information. The site offers a dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, podcasts, word games and a lot of other things that may be of interest to writers and word-lovers. General Writing Websites Writer's Digest - Probably one of the best all-around websites for writers, Writer's Digest offers information on writing better and getting published. Fiction Writing Websites About.com - About.com publishes a Guide to Fiction Writing with general information about fiction writing and a number of community forums for both current and aspiring writers. Nonfiction Writing Websites Bella Online - This site offers a large collection of resources for nonfiction writers. Websites for Freelance Writers and Authors

Write or Die by Dr Wicked | Putting the 'Prod' in Productivity Truths About Fiction The following essay was previewed in the class that Stephen Graham Jones taught for LitReactor, Your Life Story Is Five Pages Long. 1. The reader should never have to work to figure out the basics of your story. Who’s whose wife or husband, what the time period is if that matters, why these people have broken into this house, and on and on, just the basic, ground-level facts about your story. If you don’t relay that stuff up-front, as quickly and efficiently as possible (and please don’t be fancy), then your story becomes a game of three-card-monty, with you hiding information under this or that shell, trying to keep everything moving fast enough that nobody knows what’s going on. 2. Meaning you don’t have to lay every last detail of every last thing out. The best writers are the ones who can cover the most distance with the fewest words. 3. 4. You open with a hook, of course—the title—then you hook with the first line, then, usually at the end of the first paragraph, you set that hook.

Writer's Café fiction writing software - novels - screenwriting - short stories - creative fun Writing Killer Fight Scenes Fight scenes are dangerous territory for writers. On the surface, they seem as if they’re guaranteed to keep the reader glued to the action in the same way as they often do at the movies. In reality, though, readers tend to skip over fight scenes – skimming the long, tedious, blow-by-blow descriptions in favour of getting back to the dialogue and character-driven drama that truly engages them in the story. My novel, Traitor’s Blade, is a swashbuckling fantasy in which fight scenes are a crucial part of the storytelling. This means having to ensure that every piece of action is vital and engaging; it means that every duel must draw the reader in and not let them go until the end. So how do you keep the pacing, flow, and more importantly, the drama moving forward with so many fights? GIVEAWAY: Sebastien is excited to give away a free copy of his novel to a random commenter. Column by Sebastien de Castell, who had just finished a degree in archaeology when he started work on his first job.

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