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Digital Storytelling with Mobile Devices

Digital Storytelling with Mobile Devices

The Future Of Storytelling Is About To Get Wild Guest author Kim Gaskins is the director of content development and lead writer for Latitude, an international research consultancy. Many of us go about our lives constantly surrounded by screens, immersed in various "stories": movies, TV shows, books, plot-driven video games, news articles, advertising, and more. Whether we realize it or not, we're creating new behaviors, routines, mindsets, and expectations around what we watch, read or play—which in turn presents new challenges and opportunities for creators and marketers. In other words, while the fundamentals of good storytelling remain the same, technology is changing how stories can be told. But what does that mean exactly? Since last year, Latitude, a strategic insights consultancy, has been conducting an ongoing Future of Storytelling initiative to understand what audiences want for the long haul. Stories Come Out Of The Screen, Into The Physical World Characters Will Become Connections Stories Will Be Told 24/7

Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds English 50 Exercises for Story Writers English 50 – Intro to Creative Writing: Exercises for Story Writers Basic Theory: What is a short story? As soon as someone delivers a definition, some good writer will write a story that proves the theory wrong. About the only thing we can say for sure is that short stories are short and that they are written in what we call prose. Some attributes, however, seem to show up more often than not. Short stories have a narrator; that is, someone tells the story; have at least one character in them; have some action occur (or perhaps fails to occur); take place somewhere; that is, there is a setting for the action; and someone either learns something or fails to learn something (theme).With these five characteristics in mind, we can create an almost endless supply of exercises to help sharpen our techniques of story telling. Narrative Voice Twenty or so years ago, voice was the "rite of passage" into a successful writing career. If you've written a story in third person, try it in first.

Storyboard That: The World's Best FREE Online Storyboard Creator APA Formatting and Style Guide Note: This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style can be found here. Reference citations in text are covered on pages 261-268 of the Publication Manual. What follows are some general guidelines for referring to the works of others in your essay. Note: On pages 117-118, the Publication Manual suggests that authors of research papers should use the past tense or present perfect tense for signal phrases that occur in the literature review and procedure descriptions (for example, Jones (1998) found or Jones (1998) has found...). When using APA format, follow the author-date method of in-text citation. If you are referring to an idea from another work but NOT directly quoting the material, or making reference to an entire book, article or other work, you only have to make reference to the author and year of publication and not the page number in your in-text reference.

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing It's Here: A new look for the Purdue OWL! The new version of the Purdue OWL is available at Worry not! Our navigation menu and content will remain largely the same. In 11 days, we will be discontinuing owl.english.purdue.edu and you will be automatically redirected to the new site. Summary: This handout is intended to help you become more comfortable with the uses of and distinctions among quotations, paraphrases, and summaries. Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Allen BrizeeLast Edited: 2013-02-15 09:44:45 What are the differences among quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing? These three ways of incorporating other writers' work into your own writing differ according to the closeness of your writing to the source writing. Quotations must be identical to the original, using a narrow segment of the source. Paraphrasing involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. Why use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries?

Citing Yourself If you cite or quote your previous work, treat yourself as the author and your own previous course work as an unpublished paper, as shown in the APA publication manual. For example, if Marie Briggs wanted to cite a paper she wrote at Walden in 2012, her in-text citation might look like this: Briggs (2012) asserted that previous literature on the psychology of tightrope walkers was faulty in that it "presumed that risk-taking behaviors align neatly with certain personality traits or disorders" (p. 4). And in the reference list: Briggs, M. (2012). manuscript, Walden University. If your original work contained citations from other sources, you will need to include those same citations in the new work as well, per APA. According to Briggs (2012), recent psychologists such as "Presley and Johnson (2009) too quickly attributed risk-taking to genetic factors, ignoring the social family issues that often influence the decision to explore pursuits such as tightrope walking" (p. 5).

Find, Read, & Cite Journal Articles Other useful links: Basics Tutorial (w/audio), APA Style 6th Ed. Annotated Sample Paper, APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Summary Guidelines for Unbiased Language, APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Language Use for Gender,APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Language Use for Sexual Orientation,APA Style 6th Ed. (PDF) Purchase your own APA Publication Manual Writing Empirical Papers: Beginners Writing Empirical Papers: Advanced (PDF) - for use by students who have learned the basics about empirical papers. Finding articles: Searching PSYCHINFO Access the PSYCHINFO (and full-text PsycArticles if available) database through your library's web site (e.g., Trexler Library). (1) Limit your search to English language only articles (unless you read another language). (2) Students in Introductory psychology courses may want to limit your search to only the types of documents your professor is allowing for the assignment. (6) After conducting any given search, you will get a list of article titles. Finding. Finding.

DIY 3D scanner Cool. Splinescan used to have something like that as well, sans flash. I'm not sure about the technical details, but ?javascript? He may be open to approaches from people who are up for coding it or who want to play around in the splinescan source to see how things work, dunno. Once he hits a major release, I expect he may open up to co-developers who can add sexy/important features like David-scan has. I reallly want to install things like the flash thing, only without the server imploading. I'm lining up a test server to install a virgin mediawiki and phorum install on in order to test out stuff like this without rolling out unknown code on a primary server. I think it will be nice to support patch fuctionality, so that users can upload 'patches' to Darwin, Mendel, post-Mendel (Eiffel?) Patches would be clearly and politely labeled as such, and we'd manually check them into the master release after user/dev testing.

The Journaling Life: 21 Types of Journals You Can Create to Expr JCS, Journal of Consciousness Studies Critical Reviews The complete text from which these are extracted is available. See also Editorial: The Future of Consciousness Studies Over the last few years, research into consciousness has at last become accepted within the academic community. As John Searle puts it, raising the subject of consciousness in cognitive science discussions is no longer considered to be ``bad taste'', causing graduate students to ``roll their eyes at the ceiling and assume expressions of mild disgust.'' But why are we interested in consciousness? The field of consciousness studies is at a very early stage, characterized by crude theories, most of which are unlikely to stand the test of time. The Journal of Consciousness Studies covers this broad field by: Full Text of Selected Articles JCS is a traditional printed publication -- most of our subscribers like to read every article and we pride ourselves in the quality of our editing, printing and binding.

How to Write a Summary How To Writing a good summary demonstrates that you clearly understand a text...and that you can communicate that understanding to your readers. A summary can be tricky to write at first because it’s tempting to include too much or too little information. But by following our easy 8-step method, you will be able to summarize texts quickly and successfully for any class or subject. 1) Divide…and conquer. 2) Read. 3) Reread. 4) One sentence at a time. 5) Write a thesis statement. 6) Ready to write. Write in the present tense.Make sure to include the author and title of the work.Be concise: a summary should not be equal in length to the original text.If you must use the words of the author, cite them.Don't put your own opinions, ideas, or interpretations into the summary. 7) Check for accuracy. 8) Revise. Bonus Info! When you have read a well-written summary, you ought to be able to say in your own words what the book is generally about, who the main characters are, and where it takes place.

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