background preloader

Top 10 Memory Hacks

Top 10 Memory Hacks

10 Ways Improve Your Memory & Boost Brainpower Have you ever noticed that some people are able to effortlessly remember even the most mundane details, and quickly comprehend new things, and wished that you too could be like that? Well, you can. To unlock the full potential of your brain, you need to keep it active and acute. Exercise & get your body moving – exercising doesn’t just exercise the body, it also helps to exercise your brain. What are some tips or tricks you have food to increase your memory and keep your brain sharp? pts to others How to Change Your Life: A User’s Guide ‘You will never change your life until you change something you do daily.’ ~Mike Murdock By Leo Babauta Start with a simple statement: what do you want to be? Are you hoping to someday be a writer, a musician, a designer, a programmer, a polyglot, a carpenter, a manga artist, an entrepreneur, an expert at something? How do you get there? Do you set yourself a big goal to complete by the end of the year, or in three months? I’m going to lay down the law here, based on many many experiments I’ve done in the last 7 years: nothing will change unless you make a daily change. I’ve tried weekly action steps, things that I do every other day, big bold monthly goals, lots of other permutations. If you’re not willing to make it a daily change, you don’t really want to change your life in this way. So make a daily change. How to Turn an Aspiration Into a Daily Change Let’s name a few aspirations: How do you turn those lofty ideas into daily changes? You get the idea. How to Implement Daily Changes

Close the Book. Recall. Write It Down. - Chronicle.com By DAVID GLENN That old study method still works, researchers say. So why don't professors preach it? The scene: A rigorous intro-level survey course in biology, history, or economics. If you're like many professors, you'll tell them something like this: Read carefully. That's not terrible advice. Two psychology journals have recently published papers showing that this strategy works, the latest findings from a decades-old body of research. Yet many college instructors are only dimly familiar with that research. Don't Reread A central idea of Mr. "When you've got your chemis-try book in front of you, everything's right there on the page, it's all very familiar and fluent," says Jeffrey D. "So you could say to yourself, 'Yeah, I know this. These findings about active recall are not new or faddish or parochial. So if this wisdom is so well-established — at least among psychologists — should colleges explicitly try to coax students to use these study techniques? Among other things, Mr. Mr.

7 Secrets of the Super Organized A few years ago, my life was a mess. So was my house, my desk, my mind. Then I learned, one by one, a few habits that got me completely organized. Am I perfect? Of course not, and I don’t aim to be. But I know where everything is, I know what I need to do today, I don’t forget things most of the time, and my house is uncluttered and relatively clean (well, as clean as you can get when you have toddlers and big kids running around). So what’s the secret? Are these obvious principles? If your life is a mess, like mine was, I don’t recommend trying to get organized all in one shot. So here are the 7 habits: Reduce before organizing. If you take your closet full of 100 things and throw out all but the 10 things you love and use, now you don’t need a fancy closet organizer. How to reduce: take everything out of a closet or drawer or other container (including your schedule), clean it out, and only put back those items you truly love and really use on a regular basis.

Learn to Remember Everything: The Memory Palace Technique I'm working on an ebook about memory techniques. If you are interested in knowing when it is ready, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter! In this post I'll teach you how to have perfect recall of lists of items. The technique we'll be learning is called the memory palace, and is also known as the method of loci (for the latin word locus meaning place) and also the mind palace. The memory palace The memory palace technique began in the 5th century B.C., when Simonides of Ceos, poet, was attending an unfortunate banquet in Thessalia. Think about it: It is not hard to remember who sits beside the host, where your friends sit, who is beside them and so on. The memory palace is well suited to how our brains have evolved. Remembering lists may sound lame, who wants to memorise a list...? Your first memory palace: building and filling Let's start by creating our first memory palace. Now consider the following shopping list: lettuce, bacon, onion rings, SD card and oranges. Final words

The Clutter Culture - Feature - UCLA Magazine Online By Jack Feuer Published Jul 1, 2012 8:00 AM "For more than 40,000 years," write the authors, "intellectually modern humans have peopled the planet, but never before has any society accumulated so many personal possessions." Get stuff. Buy stuff. Keep it . Walk into any dual-income, middle-class home in the U.S. and you will come face to face with an awesome array of stuff—toys, trinkets, family photos, furniture, games, DVDs, TVs, digital devices of all kinds, souvenirs, flags, food and more. George Carlin famously observed that "a house is just a pile of stuff with a cover on it." We are a clutter culture. A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance (Trailer) UCLA anthropologists venture into the stuffed-to-capacity homes of dual income, middle-class American families. Click here to watch full episodes. Video by UCTV Prime Life at Home is co-authored by Ochs; Jeanne Arnold, UCLA professor of anthropology; Anthony P.

10 ways to improve your observation skills (and your career), part III | Fast Track Tools by Ken Revenaugh How did you do on the observation test? If you found your observation skills lacking, it may be something to consider working on, as… For people who plan to become the leaders of tomorrow, developing a keen sense of observation is a must. The crux of the technique lies in simply keeping your eyes and ears open at all times and never failing to register what you see or hear. Trying to look at every day life in a clear manner. Andrew Cox suggests these ten behaviors and habits of thought critical for developing accurate observation skills: Sizing up people – people watching Clarity – seeing the world as it is Curiosity – asking why Listening skills Willingness to set aside personal biases Willingness to seek the inputs of others Seeking out new experiences and possibilities Being comfortable with ambiguity Knowledge of the behaviors and attitudes of people Self-knowledge – accurately knowing your own behaviors, attitudes and personal skills, and how they impact others

BBC Future column: Why we love to hoard Here’s last week’s column from BBC Future. The original is here. It’s not really about hoarding, its about the endowment effect and a really lovely piece of work that helped found the field of behavioural economics (and win Daniel Kahneman a Nobel prize). Oh, and I give some advice on how to de-clutter, lifehacker-style. Question: How do you make something instantly twice as expensive? Answer: By giving it away. This might sound like a nonsensical riddle, but if you’ve ever felt overly possessive about your regular parking space, your pen, or your Star Wars box sets, then you’re experiencing some elements behind the psychology of ownership. This riddle actually describes a phenomenon called the Endowment Effect. You can see how the endowment effect escalates – how else can you explain the boxes of cassette tapes, shoes or mobile phones that fill several shelves of your room… or even several rooms? No trade Classic economics states that the students should begin to trade with each other.

Related: