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Charles Leadbeater: Education innovation in the slums

Charles Leadbeater: Education innovation in the slums
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The Disadvantages of an Elite Education: an article by William Deresiewicz about how universities should exist to make minds, not careers | The American Scholar Exhortation - Summer 2008 Print Our best universities have forgotten that the reason they exist is to make minds, not careers By William Deresiewicz It didn’t dawn on me that there might be a few holes in my education until I was about 35. I’d just bought a house, the pipes needed fixing, and the plumber was standing in my kitchen. It’s not surprising that it took me so long to discover the extent of my miseducation, because the last thing an elite education will teach you is its own inadequacy. I’m not talking about curricula or the culture wars, the closing or opening of the American mind, political correctness, canon formation, or what have you. The first disadvantage of an elite education, as I learned in my kitchen that day, is that it makes you incapable of talking to people who aren’t like you. But it isn’t just a matter of class. I also never learned that there are smart people who aren’t “smart.” What about people who aren’t bright in any sense?

7 Tools Students Can Use to Create Music Online Yesterday, I gave a short presentation on digital storytelling to the folks in attendance at the Ed Tech TeacherTeaching History With Technology workshop. One of the points I made to participants is that when creating multimedia digital stories the best way to avoid any kind of copyright issues is to have students create their own sounds and images to include in their projects. Here are some tools that students can use to create their own sounds online. Using Aviary's Roc service you can create your own music loops or samples. After you've created your music samples you can download them, reuse them in Myna, or embed them into your blog. Beat Lab is a free service through which you can experiment with thousands of sound and rhythm combinations. Incredibox is a neat website that allows you to create unique rhythms and sounds from drag-and-drop menu. UJAM is a service that aims to make everyone a singing sensation.

National College online network On 1 April, the National College merged with the Teaching Agency to become the National College for Teaching and Leadership. The new agency has two key aims: improving the quality of the workforce; and helping schools to help each other to improve. Find out more about the new agency. We can help you to develop as a leader and achieve your career goals. We also offer professional development for chairs of governors and school business managers. Professional development opportunities One of the most powerful ways of achieving improvement is through collaboration and we offer many opportunities for school and early years leaders to provide and receive support. Find out about becoming a teaching school or being designated as a national, local or specialist leader of education. Support for schools and early years Find out about our work with international organisations, such as education ministries, universities and the private sector overseas and in Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

Just shut up and listen, expert tells teachers John Hattie ... strong advice. JOHN HATTIE has spent his life studying the studies to find out what works in education. His advice to teachers? Just shut up. Professor Hattie, appointed this year as the director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, says teachers need to stop spending 80 per cent of their time in class talking and start listening. ''When teachers stop talking deep learning takes place,'' he told a conference of educators at Parramatta yesterday. ''It's our concept of ourselves as teachers that we have knowledge and we need to impart it. Advertisement ''Speaking 80 per cent of the time in conversation means I'm waiting for you to stop to have the chance to talk. What happens next is less clear. ''But I know it's not 80 per cent,'' he told the conference organised by Research Australia Development and Innovation Institute. ''I think it's fascinating that we have a profession where kids come to school to watch us work,'' he said.

The 21st Century Learning Initiative Access All On 1 April, the National College merged with the Teaching Agency to become the National College for Teaching and Leadership. The new agency has two key aims: improving the quality of the workforce; and helping schools to help each other to improve. Find out more about the new agency. We can help you to develop as a leader and achieve your career goals. Whether you're taking on your first leadership role or are an experienced and successful school or children's centre leader, we have something for you. We also offer professional development for chairs of governors and school business managers. Professional development opportunities One of the most powerful ways of achieving improvement is through collaboration and we offer many opportunities for school and early years leaders to provide and receive support. Find out about becoming a teaching school or being designated as a national, local or specialist leader of education. Support for schools and early years

8 Great TED Talks About The Future Of Education And Teaching These talks offer insights, concerns, and inspiration while discussing today’s educational practices and shortcomings, from a variety of perspectives. TED is a nonprofit devoted to “Ideas Worth Spreading”, bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. If you’re not already a fan of TED, maybe these will open your eyes to this wonderful resource. Education is only one of the vast array of topics covered in TED talks, so if you enjoy any of the videos below, you might want to click through the the site and check out some more of them. Ken Robinson: Changing education paradigms This delightfully illustrated video entertains while educating. Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education This video discusses “The Hole In The Wall” experiment that Mitra started in New Delhi in 1999. Conrad Wolfram: Teaching kids real math with computers Math as it’s taught in classrooms rarely echoes math as it used in the real word. About Kelly Walsh Print This Post

Educators Cite Research to Shift Ed-Tech Focus From 'Why?' to 'How?' Published Online: July 12, 2011 Published in Print: July 13, 2011, as Educators Cite Research to Shift Ed-Tech Focus From 'Why' to 'How' Thousands gather in Philadelphia to share digital ideas, experiences, goals Philadelphia As Chris Lehmann closed the recent International Society for Technology in Education's annual conference, he implored the audience at his keynote address here to redraw the educational technology battle lines. "No one is arguing we shouldn't use technology in education anymore," said Mr. The call for redefining debate echoed throughout the formal sessions at the conference last month and at informal events at nearby hotels, restaurants, and bars, and even in casual conversations among the more than 20,000 estimated attendees. The latest research by Project Tomorrow, an Irvine, Calif. Teacher-Student Disconnect "From the Speak Up data, what we're seeing is a disconnect" between students and educators, said Julie Evans, the president of Project Tomorrow. Perception Gap

Crash course in learning theory « If pets could design user experiences... | Main | Crash Course in Learning Summary » Crash course in learning theory One formula (of many) for a successful blog is to create a "learning blog". A blog that shares what you know, to help others. Even--or especially--if that means giving away your "secrets". Teaching people to do what you do is one of the best ways we know to grow an audience--an audience of users you want to help. It's what I try to do here because--let's face it--you're just not that into me ; ) But I assume (since you're reading this blog) that you ARE into helping your users kick ass. So, as promised in an earlier post, here's a crash course on some of our favorite learning techniques gleaned from cognitive science, learning theory, neuroscience, psychology, and entertainment (including game design). This is not a comprehensive look at the state of learning theory today, but it does include almost everything we think about in creating our books. The long version...

What are educators' professional obligations to learn from social media channels? | Dangerously Irrelevant Paul Bogush pushed back (in a nice way) on my recently-popular post, If you were on Twitter. First he wrote about how most educators are too busy to be involved in social media. Then he wrote about all of the wonderful things that happened during the time when he wasn't on Twitter. there are countless educators who are finding ways to tap into the connective and learning power of social media while simultaneously having healthy, balanced personal and professional lives. All of this time balance stuff aside, I believe that there's a bigger issue worth considering. Although there is a lot of noise out there on the Web, it's hard to argue that there is little learning value in social media. The barriers to using social media as learning tools usually are more mental, emotional, or logistical than technological. When will we start incorporating the use of social media learning channels into the broader definition of what it means to be an education professional? Image credit: Internet open

Schools, technology, test scores, and the New York Times [cross-posted at The Huffington Post] Earlier this week the New York Times wondered whether investments in educational technology were worth it since most schools don’t see any concurrent improvement in students’ standardized test scores. That’s not exactly a new issue but it’s worth examining again. After all, we are talking about large sums of money here. I’ll start with some broad categories of pushback against the article… 1. It’s hard to get at critical thinking, problem solving, effective communication and collaboration, complex synthesis and analysis, and other higher-order thinking skills with a bubble test. 2. Most school districts ask their technology coordinator(s) to support computers and/or people at ratios that would absolutely horrify folks in the business world. 3. We shouldn’t expect test score gains when few teachers have been trained well to use digital technologies to improve learning outcomes. 4. 5. 6. So, let’s sum up… Does this make sense to anybody? Wrap-up A. B.

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