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Burmese Mountain Dog Club of America

Burmese Mountain Dog Club of America
General Appearance Size, Proportion, Substance A mature Burmese Mountain Dog should be symmetrical in outline, slightly longer than tall but well balanced. Head Should be of fair length, the skull flat and rather broad between the ears and should be free from wrinkles when in repose. Neck, Topline, Body The neck should be fairly strong and free from throatiness. Forequarters The shoulders should be sloping, clean and muscular, denoting speed. Related:  Spoof Websites

Burmese Mountain Dog GENOCHOICE - Create Your Own Genetically Healthy Child Online! Coalition to Ban DHMO Dihydrogen Monoxide Homepage "The United States will not weaponize DHMO as long as I am President. You have my solemn word on this. Beware of Conservative Republicans though." The Invisible Killer Dihydrogen monoxide (DHMO) is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and sickens over 4 billion and kills over 2 million people every year (United Nations World Health Organization, 2008: www.WHO.Int). "Recreational DHMO illness can have a significant impact on public health not only because of the severity of the illness but also the number of people who die *Department of Health, State Of Washington (www2.DOH.WA.Gov). Dihydrogen monoxide: Contamination Is Reaching Epidemic Proportions! Quantities of dihydrogen monoxide have been found in almost every stream, lake, and reservoir in America today. Despite the danger, dihydrogen monoxide is often used: The Horror Must Be Stopped! It's Not Too Late! Act NOW to prevent further contamination . Further Reading: Anderson, A., & Olson, L. (1961). Other Web Sites for more information:

Save The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus Help Save The ENDANGERED From EXTINCTION! The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus Rare photo of the elusive tree octopus The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. An intelligent and inquisitive being (it has the largest brain-to-body ratio for any mollusk), the tree octopus explores its arboreal world by both touch and sight. Reaching out with one of her eight arms, each covered in sensitive suckers, a tree octopus might grab a branch to pull herself along in a form of locomotion called tentaculation; or she might be preparing to strike at an insect or small vertebrate, such as a frog or rodent, or steal an egg from a bird's nest; or she might even be examining some object that caught her fancy, instinctively desiring to manipulate it with her dexterous limbs (really deserving the title "sensory organs" more than mere "limbs",) in order to better know it. Why It's Endangered

Improbable Research Feline Reactions to Bearded Men by Catherine Maloney, Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut, Sarah J. Lichtblau, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois Nadya Karpook, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Carolyn Chou, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Anthony Arena-DeRosa, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts A feline subject reacts to a photograph of a man with a full dark semicircular beard. Abstract Cats were exposed to photographs of bearded men. Findings of Prior Investigators Boone (1958) found inconclusive results in studying feline reactions to clean-shaven men. Norquist (1988) performed a series of experiments in which cats were exposed to photographs of Robert Bork[1] (not pictured here), a man whose beard is confined largely to the underside of the jaw. Materials Five photographs were used in the study. The test subjects were female cats, all between the ages of four and six. 214 cats participated in the study. Methods Results Notes

Research Feline Reactions to Bearded Men by Catherine Maloney, Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut, Sarah J. Lichtblau, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois Nadya Karpook, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Carolyn Chou, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Anthony Arena-DeRosa, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts A feline subject reacts to a photograph of a man with a full dark semicircular beard. Abstract Cats were exposed to photographs of bearded men. Findings of Prior Investigators Boone (1958) found inconclusive results in studying feline reactions to clean-shaven men. Norquist (1988) performed a series of experiments in which cats were exposed to photographs of Robert Bork[1] (not pictured here), a man whose beard is confined largely to the underside of the jaw. Materials Five photographs were used in the study. The test subjects were female cats, all between the ages of four and six. 214 cats participated in the study. Methods Results Notes

Google Technology The technology behind Google's great results As a Google user, you're familiar with the speed and accuracy of a Google search. How exactly does Google manage to find the right results for every query as quickly as it does? The heart of Google's search technology is PigeonRankā„¢, a system for ranking web pages developed by Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin at Stanford University. Building upon the breakthrough work of B. Why Google's patented PigeonRankā„¢ works so well PigeonRank's success relies primarily on the superior trainability of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) and its unique capacity to recognize objects regardless of spatial orientation. By collecting flocks of pigeons in dense clusters, Google is able to process search queries at speeds superior to traditional search engines, which typically rely on birds of prey, brooding hens or slow-moving waterfowl to do their relevance rankings. Integrity Data PigeonRank Frequently Asked Questions How was PigeonRank developed?

The Ova Prima Foundation Bottom of the Fourth: Target Field Collapses Due to Resonant Frequency of The Wave MINNEAPOLIS (Bottom of the Fourth) - It has not been a good year for Minnesota's stadium engineers. First, the Metrodome's roof collapsed because of a large snow build-up, reportedly because engineers had "failed to account for the fact that sometimes there is snow in winter". Now, just a few months later, the Minnesota Twins' less-than-two-year-old stadium Target Field has also collapsed, much more devastatingly. Scientists say the collapse was a result of The Wave, which had been started by drunk frat boys (as is generally the case) in the 7th inning. (For reference, the average period of The Wave at the Metrodome was about 48 seconds, as documented here.) As it happens, 1:26 is also the period of resonance of Target Field. Target Field lead engineer David Ruggiero was distraught, and dumbfounded. Ruggiero's team is now working to figure out how a Wave could be so slow.

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