background preloader

The Cob House Collection at Natural Homes

The Cob House Collection at Natural Homes
This home was the first fully permitted cob house in Canada. It was a collaboration between Pat and Tracy [www.cobworks.com], Ianto [www.cobcottage.com] and Elke [www.elkecole.com] with a team of volunteers. The roof is totally load bearing on the cob walls. The house, built in 1999, is 600 sq.ft (56m2) on 2 floors and cost about $56,000 (£35,000). Here's Pat introducing this and other cob homes he has built.

http://naturalhomes.org/cobhouses.htm

Related:  Ideal LivingHouses

A beautiful natural home, "harmful to the rural character of the locality" say Council Finally, Charlie had been living with his partner Megan in a damp caravan for the past 4 years. With a baby on the way Charlie felt he had no choice but to build his house without the approval of the planning authorities, convinced permission for his home would be refused. The lack of affordable homes and strict planning regulations touches many lives. Hundertwasser the famous architect, designer and artist wrote, "The individual's desire to build something should not be deterred! Everyone should be able and have to build and thus be truly responsible for the four walls in which he lives". Jon Jandai, Director of Pun Pun Organic Farm said at a TED presentation in Thailand,

The turf homes at Glaumbaer Farm, Iceland. The buildings are made from thin shells of wood separated from one another, insulated and roofed by thick walls of turf. Icelandic grass grows very thickly producing a strong and enduring combination of roots and soil. A turf building, in districts of moderate rainfall, can last up to a century. The roof must be sloped at the correct angle; if it is too flat, water leaks through and if it is too steep, the turf cracks during spells of dry weather or drains too quickly so the grass doesn't grow, both resulting in a roof that leaks. You can take a tour of the turf farm in the video right.

Farmer Builds A House For Just £150 With Cob & Salvaged Items Michael Buck used only natural materials or unwanted items to build 'cob house' at bottom of his gardenHe said he wanted to challenge the notion that paying for a house should take a lifetimeHe is now renting out the property to a worker on a neighouring farm, who pays for her lodgings in milk By David Wilkes for the Daily Mail Published: 11:32 GMT, 25 November 2013 | Updated: 02:06 GMT, 26 November 2013 How to build a Blackhouse In the pictures above (left and right) you can see how the oat straw thatch is fixed to the stonework and kept in place by ropes and stone. The oat straw was replaced regularly and the old thatch was used for fertiliser. Above (middle) is the central open fire with a bed alcove (Pattern No. 188) in the background. The home (right) is a modern blackhouse built in Canada.

Tiny Earthen Home Dome Project led by: Jeffrey Location: Aprovecho, Cottage Grove, OR Date: September 2011 – April 2012 Reclaimed timber ceiling feature, surrounded by earthen plaster The project began with an idea: by reducing the size of a house, we actually increase the space we live in. Having a smaller home forces us outside and into nature. My aim was to make a well built cabin cheaply; using material destined for the landfill as much as possible.I feel that much of the western world has become a ‘throw-away’ society. Intimate Portraits of Sleeping Pregnant Couples by Russian Photographer Jana Romanova When Russian photographer Jana Romanova’s friends started getting married and having children, she started looking for a way to deal with this sudden change in her life. The product of her efforts was an extraordinarily intimate and tender portrait series of young sleeping pregnant couples called ‘Waiting’. Romanova started the series by shooting her pregnant friends as they slept. She said that the project began as a way to get used to the fact that all of her friends were getting pregnant and talking about how their lives would need to change for their children. She later expanded the project, contacting pregnant couples online. She managed to find 40 couples over the course of two years, each one representing another week of pregnancy.

Collapsible woven refugee shelters powered by the sun More than 40 million people worldwide have been displaced from their homes and left to find shelter in strange lands. Maybe they find a tarp, or a tent, but their quality of life almost always remains dismal. To close this gap in need, Jordanian-Canadian architect and designer Abeer Seikaly designed a new kind of shelter. One that allows refugees to rebuild their lives with dignity. RELATED: Gorgeous shape-shifting shelters for nomads and refugees that move with the weather Seikaly, now living in Amman, Jordan is well poised to design a dwelling for refugees given that her ancestors in Jordan probably toggled between nomadic and sheltered life in the desert for centuries.

Bamboo, Wattle & Daub Yurt Posted by Jeffrey | Posted in Earthen Yurt | Posted on 23-06-2012 Tags: aprovecho, bamboo, daub, earthen, kiko denzer, natual building, reciprocal roof, wattle, wattle and daub, yurt Project led by: Kiko Denzer Location: Aprovecho, Cottage Grove, OR Date: August 2012 This earthen yurt was built as part of the ‘sustainable shelter series’ at Aprovecho. The yurt is made from site harvested bamboo, lashed together using recycled bailers twine. It features a reciprocal roof, meaning that every beam is supported by all the beams in front, and in turn supports all behind it. Brooklyn Tweed JF: Welcome, Dianna! Glad to have you on the blog today! DW: Thanks for having me! Mind Openerz “Happiness is a habit – cultivate it.” ~ Elbert Hubbard Happiness is one aspiration all people share. No one wants to be sad and depressed. We’ve all seen people who are always happy – even amidst agonizing life trials.

Cob House Photo Gallery Pat's First Cob (1998) This was Patrick's first cob project on his own after taking a one week workshop with Cob Cottage Company (CCC) in 1997. He built the foundation and then used beach logs for the frame.

Related:  extérieur