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College Is Dead. Long Live College!

College Is Dead. Long Live College!
On Sept. 17, the Pakistani government shut down access to YouTube. The purported reason was to block the anti-Muslim film trailer that was inciting protests around the world. One little-noticed consequence of this decision was that 215 people in Pakistan suddenly lost their seats in a massive, open online physics course. The free college-level class, created by a Silicon Valley start-up called Udacity, included hundreds of short YouTube videos embedded on its website. Some 23,000 students worldwide had enrolled, including Khadijah Niazi, a pigtailed 11-year-old in Lahore. She was on question six of the final exam when she encountered a curt message saying “this site is unavailable.” (GOOGLE+ HANGOUT: Can Online Mega Courses Change Education?) Niazi was devastated. In every country, education changes so slowly that it can be hard to detect progress. None of these students had met one another in person. High-End Learning on the Cheap The hype about online learning is older than Niazi.

http://nation.time.com/2012/10/18/college-is-dead-long-live-college/

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A First for Udacity: Transfer Credit at a U.S. University for One of Its Courses - Technology By Katherine Mangan A Colorado university is announcing on Thursday that it will give full transfer credit to students who complete a free introductory computer-science course offered by the online-education start-up company Udacity. The announcement, by Colorado State University-Global Campus, is a milestone for the Stanford University spinoff. This is the first time a university in the United States has offered academic credit for a Udacity course, although several universities in Austria and Germany already do. The course, "Introduction to Computer Science: Building a Search Engine," teaches basic computer-science skills by having students build a Web search engine similar to Google. Students enrolled in the free, online course also learn the basics of the programming language Python.

Google To Launch “For Everyone” Ad Campaign Around New Chromebooks, Expands Best Buy Partnership To 500 Stores When Google announced the new $249 Chromebooks from Samsung this morning, the big message was that these computers are “for everyone.” If that sounds like a marketing slogan, well, that’s exactly what it is — Chrome and Apps Senior Vice President Sundar Pichai said Google is launching an ad campaign around that theme, starting with TV spots that should air tonight. This will actually be Google’s first big marketing push for the Chromebook, he said. Pichai compared the situation to the launch of Chrome, where Google waited until the team felt it was “really ready for the mainstream,” which meant that the first real ad campaign ran about year after Chrome first became available. You can see the first “For Everyone” ad below. It’s definitely aiming for a non-techie audience — there was no mention of specs or features, and in fact relatively few shots of the Chromebook itself (there was a fleeting glimpse of a toddler stepping on one).

Reliability of Wikipedia The reliability of Wikipedia (primarily of the English-language edition), compared to other encyclopedias and more specialized sources, has been assessed in many ways, including statistically, through comparative review, analysis of the historical patterns, and strengths and weaknesses inherent in the editing process unique to Wikipedia.[1] Wikipedia is open to anonymous and collaborative editing, so assessments of its reliability usually include examination of how quickly false or misleading information is removed. An early study conducted by IBM researchers in 2003—two years following Wikipedia's establishment—found that "vandalism is usually repaired extremely quickly—so quickly that most users will never see its effects"[12] and concluded that Wikipedia had "surprisingly effective self-healing capabilities".[13] A 2007 peer-reviewed study stated that "42% of damage is repaired almost immediately... Nonetheless, there are still hundreds of millions of damaged views.

530 Free Online Courses from Top Universities Get 1200 free online courses from the world’s leading universities — Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, Oxford and more. You can download these audio & video courses (often from iTunes, YouTube, or university web sites) straight to your computer or mp3 player. Over 30,000 hours of free audio & video lectures, await you now. Professor Leaves Teaching Post at Stanford, Hoping to Reach 500,000 at Online Start-Up - Technology By Nick DeSantis A Stanford University professor who made headlines this past fall by teaching an online artificial-intelligence course to more than 160,000 students has left his teaching post at the university to seek an even bigger audience. The professor, Sebastian Thrun, announced last week that he would teach free online courses through a company he co-founded instead, with the goal of reaching half a million students at once. The leap to the commercial sector may have been his plan all along: He gave up tenure in April to continue working for Google, where he helped create a driverless car. Two months later, he started a company called Know Labs, and its technology powered the fall course.

Stem Sell: F1 and SAE Team Make Science Cool for Generation Next - Motor Trend Blog SAE Team Photo Back to Article1 - 3 of 3Next Gallery Research a Vehicle Select Make Acura Aston Martin Coursera Business model[edit] The contract between Coursera and participating universities contains a "brainstorming" list of ways to generate revenue, including verified certification fees, introducing students to potential employers and recruiters (with student consent), tutoring, sponsorships and tuition fees.[5][6] In September 2013 it announced it had earned $1 million in revenue through verified certificates that authenticate successful course completion.[7] As of December 2013 the company had raised $85 million in venture capital.[8][9] John Doerr suggested that people will pay for "valuable, premium services".[10] Any revenue stream will be divided, with schools receiving a small percentage of revenue and 20% of gross profits.[6][11] In January 2013, Coursera announced that the American Council on Education had approved five courses for college credit.[12] As the journalist Steve Kolowich noted[12] "whether colleges take the council's advice, however, is an open question." Courses[edit]

Open Learning Initiative At Harvard Extension School, free and open learning is hardly a new concept. In fact, the Extension School was founded with this mission in mind: to create an affordable way for any motivated student to take courses at Harvard. We stay true to this mission today, offering several free courses and nearly 800 for-credit courses at reasonable tuition rates. Google Releases Open-Source Online-Education Software - Wired Campus Google has taken what its officials call an “experimental first step” into online education, releasing open-source software called Course Builder in hopes that universities will use it to deliver free online courses. The search giant says it is in talks with edX—a partnership among Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California at Berkeley to offer free online courses—though officials declined to comment further. A post on Google’s research blog this week also cited nine universities interested in using the platform, including Stanford University.

The Teacher's Guide to Facebook Facebook is the world's largest social network, reaching 1 billion active users at the beginning of October. People across the globe use Facebook to connect with old friends, share news about their lives and even to maximize their brand's social reach. SEE ALSO: The Beginner's Guide to Facebook

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