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Guest Post: How I Went From Writing 2,000 Words a Day to 10,000 Words a Day - SFWA

by Rachel Aaron When I started writing The Spirit War (Eli novel #4), I had a bit of a problem. I had a brand new baby and my life (like every new mother’s life) was constantly on the verge of shambles. I paid for a sitter four times a week so I could get some writing time, and I guarded these hours like a mama bear guards her cubs – with ferocity and hiker-mauling violence. To keep my schedule and make my deadlines, I needed to write 4000 words during each of these carefully arranged sessions. I thought this would be simple. But (of course), things didn’t work out like that. Needless to say, I felt like a failure. So, once and for all, here’s the story of how I went from writing 500 words an hour to over 1500, and (hopefully) how you can too: A quick note: There are many fine, successful writers out there who equate writing quickly with being a hack. Update! Side 1: Knowledge, or Know What You’re Writing Before You Write It This was how I had always written, it felt natural to me.

http://www.sfwa.org/2011/12/guest-post-how-i-went-from-writing-2000-words-a-day-to-10000-words-a-day/

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The 12 Stages of Physical Intimacy – What Are They? Gustav Klimt ~ The Kiss The day after Valentine’s Day seemed like the perfect time to clue y’all in on a secret the romance writers have been keeping to themselves. Since a good portion of the ladies out there probably curled up with a sexy book last night, I’m going to explain what makes these hot tamale novels so dang satisfying. Resources for Romance Writers I've tried to make this site as helpful as I could. Everything here is put together to help other romance authors learn the ropes, improve their writing, promote their writing, stay in touch with other writers, or just keep on writing. I hope it's easy to find your way around the site and that you come back often to visit. I try to check the links on these pages from time to time, but there are so many pages and so many links, and websites often go down quickly and without warning, so please forgive any broken links you find. Happy writing, best wishes and hugs from one struggling writer to another,

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling « Aerogramme Writers' Studio These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar’s Story Artist. Number 9 on the list – When you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn’t happen next – is a great one and can apply to writers in all genres. You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be very different.Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.Once upon a time there was ___. Every day, ___.

7 Books That Will Change The Way You See The World by Gary ‘Z’ McGee “You want weapons? Go to a library. Books are the best weapons in the world.” –Doctor Who MASTER LIST of Gestures and Body Language! Hey there! Lots of writers liked my list of facial expressions, so I thought I would do a companion post about gestures and body language. Describing these can help readers visualize a scene and get a feel for the characters, and again, they can set up lines of dialogue so you don’t have a string of he said, she said, he asked, she exclaimed, etc., running down the page. You might want to consider which gestures or what body language is typical for each of your characters. For instance, one of my characters in the novel I just finished tends to hug herself when she’s nervous, while another has a habit of rubbing at his shoulder when he’s uncomfortable. They only do it a few times each throughout the book, but I think details like that make characters feel more solid.

Get Me Writing » 5 Fool-Proof Ways to Put your Muse to Work EmailEmail Are you at the mercy of your Muse? Do you wake at night drenched in sweat, the icy fingers of a nightmare still clinging to your heart? 12, William Faulkner William Faulkner, ca. 1954. Photograph by Carl Van Vechten William Faulkner was born in 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi, where his father was then working as a conductor on the railroad built by the novelist’s great-grandfather, Colonel William Falkner (without the “u”), author of The White Rose of Memphis. Soon the family moved to Oxford, thirty-five miles away, where young Faulkner, although he was a voracious reader, failed to earn enough credits to be graduated from the local high school. In 1918 he enlisted as a student flyer in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He spent a little more than a year as a special student at the state university, Ole Miss, and later worked as postmaster at the university station until he was fired for reading on the job.

How Walking Fosters Creativity: Stanford Researchers Confirm What Philosophers and Writers Have Always Known Image via Diego Sevilla Ruiz A certain Zen proverb goes something like this: “A five year old can understand it, but an 80 year old cannot do it.” The subject of this riddle-like saying has been described as “mindfulness”—or being absorbed in the moment, free from routine mental habits. In many Eastern meditative traditions, one can achieve such a state by walking just as well as by sitting still—and many a poet and teacher has preferred the ambulatory method. How to Rock Your Story's Tension photo cred: © Sergei Zolkin via Unsplash Today we’re talkin’ tension. No matter your story’s plot or genre, you need to know how to nail tension in your fiction. Why? For starters, tension occurs every time a hero and a villain come in contact.

Free Thriller Novel Writing Tips Thrillers are a genre that many people can't get enough of. Building tension and keeping people turning pages are essential for successfully crafting these types of stories. As with any specific type of writing, even those with a natural talent will need some pointers. While "thriller" is not, strictly speaking, a format, a few tips can go a long way in giving your audience -- and your editor -- what they are looking for in your writing. Writing Breakout Thrillers 25 Things You Should Know About Word Choice - StumbleUpon 1. A Series Of Word Choices Here’s why this matters: because both writing and storytelling comprise, at the most basic level, a series of word choices.

Arts Tasmania The following resources may be useful for writers and publishers. Tasmanian membership organisations and peak bodies The Tasmanian Writers’ CentreA not-for-profit organisation that supports literature and writing in all forms and provides up-to-date news about events and opportunities in Tasmania. National membership organisations and peak bodies The Writers Alley: How To Write A Kissing Scene...Valentine Edition The Kiss...the moment when lips meet, when senses are heightened, when hearts meld. It is a magical thing, because women loved to be kissed They want to be wanted, desired, loved. When writing romance, the kiss is of the utmost importance. So how does one go about writing a kissing scene? Formula for Writing a Romance Novel by Irene Vartanoff Okay, you want to write a romance novel. There are good reasons to write one.

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