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38 Must Have Kitchen Items for Any Survivalist

38 Must Have Kitchen Items for Any Survivalist
Related:  Bartering: Skills and Equipment

Top Post-Collapse Barter Items and Trade Skills by Brandon Smith by Brandon Smith Alt-Market.com The concept of private barter and alternative economies has been so far removed from our daily existence here in America that the very idea of participating in commerce without the use of dollars or without the inclusion of corporate chains seems almost outlandish to many people. However, the fact remains that up until very recently (perhaps the last three to four decades) barter and independent trade was commonplace in this country. Without it, many families could not have survived. Whether we like it or not, such economic methods will be making a return very soon, especially in the face of a plunging dollar, inflating wholesale prices, erratic investment markets, and unsustainable national debts. This means that each and every one of us will not only be driven to form barter networks outside the designated confines of the mainstream, we will have to become active producers within those networks. Top Priority Goods Fresh Produce: Ever heard of scurvy?

Top 3 multi-purpose survival items With a very limited number of items that you can carry in a survival situation, you need to make sure that some of those items have multiple purposes. Please click on the link below and let me know what you think of this article by security, survival and self-defense expert David Morris. Meet you on the other side. Top 3 Multi-Purpose Survival Items The top three multi-purpose items you should have with you at all times are: Strong cord, such as paracord or parachute cord. Would you choose different multi-purpose items to have in a survival situation? At Home At Wilderness Related Content Mountain Fun We enjoy sledding and snowshoeing in the winter as outdoor activities. When you're out collecting firewood, foraging for wild edibles, or plowing your fields, you can never be sure that you won't suddenly be faced with a situation in which your survival depends upon your ability to make a shelter, find food and water, and build a fire. In fact, even if you're 'safely" ensconced in the security of a cabin, a farmhouse, or a city apartment, any number of natural or man-made disasters can force you to keep yourself alive by using only what is available in nature. However, any person who knows how to provide his or her necessities, without having to depend on manufactured commodities, can endure even if a calamity severs all ties with the rest of society. But good survival skills include more than the ability to live through a disaster. I believe—and teach—just the opposite. You see, I believe nature can provide a person with everything he or she needs. Try It

How to Save Your Seeds I think the practice of saving seeds is due for a revival. Seed saving is rewarding in so many ways. It’s very easy. If you find yourself smitten by it, there are ways you can get more expert about it. However, even a little seed saving is an empowering and powerful thing to do. Basics What you basically do when you save seeds is this: you go to the seeds when they are ready and get them; you make sure they’re really dry, and then you store them. It’s as simple as that but … Getting good seeds at the right time involves knowing the usual life cycle of a plant and whether a seed will stay true. You can gather them in different ways such as plucking, rubbing, shaking or grabbing. Making sure seeds are dry enough means having a good drying space for them. Storing seeds well involves having appropriate labels and containers for them. Plant Types and Specifics Plants are annual, biennial or perennial. ~Annual plants (such as lettuce and tomatoes) flower and mature seed in the same year. Lettuce Whew.

The Fantastic Four – 4 Essential Wild Edible Plants that May Just Save Your Life Did you realize that knowing just 4 wild edible plants could one day save your life? If there were any four categories of plants that I would recommend all people to know how to use and identify it would be these: Grass, Oak, Pine, and Cattail. For the knowledgeable survivor, knowing just these four plants can make the difference between life and death if stranded in the wilds – for each one is an excellent food source which can sustain you until help arrives. Throughout this week and part of the next, I’ll be going into details on how you can prepare and eat these plants. Grass Surprising to many is the fact that you can eat grass. The young shoots up to 6 inches tall can be eaten raw and the starchy base (usually white and at the bottom when you pluck it) can be eaten as a trail nibble. The best part of the grass plant to eat are the seed heads, which can be gathered to make millet for breads or filler for soups & stews. Oak Pine “You can eat pine?!” Cattail Conclusion

Ultimate Survival Skills | How to Build a Survivalist Homestead The author is a retired U.S. Army sergeant with a background in infantry, logistics and administrative and security training. He currently heads his own security firm and is an adjunct faculty member with the University of New Hampshire teaching seminars on home food production.-The editors. It is a home in which you can live in a real-world/present-time economy and social order, yet at the same time practice on a regular basis the survival skills you may need later. All of this is accomplished while still living a normal life-style with access to work, schools, emergency services and stores, etc. The survivalist homestead offers one more very important option. In planning a survivalist homestead there are three concepts which must be incorporated into your thinking from the start and which must be adhered to if the goals are to be met. Plan A and Plan B-Plan A is that part of all planning of your homestead which has to do with dealing in the present/real world time frame. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Gardening in a drought Guest post by Mark M. NOTE: This may be something to print out and store in your SurvivalMom Binder for future reference. image by International Center for Tropical Agriculture I have lived in many countries over the years, and have always had a vegetable garden. Not just for cost, as many of the countries I have lived in have had what we considered dirt cheap food, but for the quality. Nothing compares to the taste of veggies fresh from the garden. Recently, some friends told me about the bad drought in Texas. Kenya and Botswana. So how do they manage that? The technique involves three separate things, all of which are easily made by anyone with the ability to use a shovel, hammer or a trowel. Raised beds When we rented our home in Botswana, in the yard behind the house was a series of concrete troughs, roughly 4 foot wide, 2 foot deep and 15 foot long, running north to south. Shade netting Every 3 feet in the troughs was a hole, just the right size to take a ¾ inch PVC pipe. Thread watering

10 Ways to Survive a Snowstorm There's no truer statement than the old adage "you can't control the weather." You can't­ even predict it with complete certainty. As advanced as our meteorological forecasting techniques are these days, weather systems are changeable forces of nature. They can come on quickly, switch direction without notice and build in intensity in a short period of time. Whether you're at home, on foot, in your car or at work, a winter snowstorm can catch you off guard. The Nation­al Snow and Ice Data Center defines a blizzard as a "violent winter storm, lasting at least 3 hours, which combines below freezing temperatures and very strong wind laden with blowing snow that reduces visibility to less than 1 km." If a blizzard is bad enough, snow plows and salt trucks won't even brave the elements.

8 Common Mistakes of Wilderness Survival 1. No Shelter This is a two fold mistake that will cost you your life in a Wilderness Survival Situation. The first fold of this mistake is not having a proper shelter with you, the second fold is not having the knowledge to build a shelter from nature’s tools which are all around you. 2. People who venture into the Wilderness without a map, compass, and GPS are flirting with disaster. Anyone who has spent time in the woods knows that within seconds even the best woodsman can get turned around in thick trees and bushes and begin to walk the wrong way. 3. “Be Prepared” is the motto of the Boy Scouts, unfortunately most people who find themselves in a Wilderness Survival situation have very poor knowledge on how to survival and are usually totally unprepared. 4. Most Wilderness Survival situations start off very innocent; like a fishing trip with friends, a day hike on a familiar trail, or a planned father & son hunting trip. 5. 6. 7. 8. Visit Sponsors of SurvivalCache.com Save

Barter items for post teotwawki - SHTF Survival Forum If SHTF tomorrow, 12 months later, what items would you have that you could use for barter? Is bartering even in your plans, have you even thought about it? The other day I was walking through wal-mart and was thinking about low cost, good quality trade items. There is a difference in good quality, medium quality and poor quality barter items. Here are some examples of barter/trade items: Gold and silver only have value when someone values money. Solar panels, seeds, first aid supplies are a good quality trade items. Clothing might have an “ok” trade value. Hand tools might be a medium quality trade item. Computers and other electronics would be a poor quality item – without electricity, what good are electronics. When you start talking about matches, seeds, flashlights, batteries,,,,,, some of those are disposable items – you use them once and then its gone. I dont think food has very much of a trade value – unless the other person is starving. Matches, they burn once, and its gone.

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