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My dad

My dad
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flipped classroom An excellent tool for your flipped classroom is EDpuzzle. With this tool you can crop a video to only use the portion you need for your specific class. Another feature is you can add your own voice by inserting audio notes or recording over the video. The embed quiz feature allows you to add questions at random points in the video to engage students and check their understanding of the material. With EDpuzzle you can locate video from a number of sources including Youtube, Teacher Tube, Khan Academy, TED and LearnZillion. Click here to visit the site. INTRODUCING EDpuzzle Edpuzzle Demo Playlist My First Edpuzzle Video I have uploaded both my edited video and the original for you to see the difference between the two and get an idea of the options available to edit your video with EDpuzzle. Below is the original video from My Smart Hands.

Making a Genealogy Map Using the Google Maps API Introduction I wanted to try out using the Google Maps API for a project, so I decided I’d try to use it in conjunction with some genealogy data to see what I could come up with. The result is a family tree which is mapped out spatially rather than chronologically; once rendered, the following visual data is revealed: Migration paths - see where particular people suddenly moved a large distance Geographical density/immobility - see which areas the most family members were from Most popular places - see which villages or cities successive generations lived in Example Click on the image below to view a live example of the project (using real data from my family tree) and then read on for an explanation of how the program works: Features Google Maps features: Pan and zoom around the map using AJAX technology Switch to vector mapping, satellite mapping or hybrid maps Program features: By way of compromise, it is possible to adjust the zoom level via a variable at the top of the program though. Code

Open Culture - Free Cultural & Educational Media Online DC: Rauner: So. Strafford, VT Cemeteries Mary B. Slade collection on South Strafford, Vermont, cemeteries, undated Use & Access The materials represented in this guide may be accessed through the Rauner Special Collections Library at Dartmouth College. The Rauner Library is located in Webster Hall. The materials must be used on-site and may not leave Rauner Library. The Rauner Special Collections Library is open to the public and in most cases no appointment is necessary. • Rauner Library Hours• Rauner Library Patron Information Access to Collection Unrestricted. Use Restrictions Permission from Dartmouth College required for publication or reproduction. Introduction to the Collection The collection contains a typescript copy the records of the South Strafford, Vermont cemeteries originally compiled by Mrs. Biography Mary B. Series 1, Records, undated Access Restrictions Box: 1, Dates: undated Records of South Strafford, Vermont cemeteries, typed from the one Mrs. Box Contents There is no folder listing for this box.

European Neanderthals were on the verge of extinction even before the arrival of modern humans New findings from an international team of researchers show that most Neanderthals in Europe died off around 50,000 years ago. The previously held view of a Europe populated by a stable Neanderthal population for hundreds of thousands of years up until modern humans arrived must therefore be revised. This new perspective on the Neanderthals comes from a study of ancient DNA published February 25 in Molecular Biology and Evolution. The results indicate that most Neanderthals in Europe died off as early as 50,000 years ago. The study is the result of an international project led by Swedish and Spanish researchers in Uppsala, Stockholm and Madrid. “The fact that Neanderthals in Europe were nearly extinct, but then recovered, and that all this took place long before they came into contact with modern humans came as a complete surprise to us.

DC: Rauner: NH & VT Cemetery Collection Collection of Records and Research Materials Relating to Cemeteries in Vermont and New Hampshire, 1845 - 2007 Use & Access The materials represented in this guide may be accessed through the Rauner Special Collections Library at Dartmouth College. The Rauner Library is located in Webster Hall. The Rauner Special Collections Library is open to the public and in most cases no appointment is necessary. • Rauner Library Hours• Rauner Library Patron Information Access to Collection Unrestricted. Use Restrictions Permission from Dartmouth College required for publication or reproduction. Introduction to the Collection The collection of New Hampshire and Vermont cemeteries contains maps, notes taken from physical observation of gravestones and from town' records of interments. Introduction Artificial collection of materials gathered circa 1993 relating to selected cemeteries in New Hampshire and Vermont. Series 26581, New Hampshire and Vermont cemeteries, 1845-2007 Access Restrictions Unrestricted

Neanderthals died out earlier than previously thought, new evidence suggests Direct dating of a fossil of a Neanderthal infant suggests that Neanderthals probably died out earlier than previously thought. Researchers have dated a Neanderthal fossil discovered in a significant cave site in Russia in the northern Caucasus, and found it to be 10,000 years older than previous research had suggested. This new evidence throws into doubt the theory that Neanderthals and modern humans interacted for thousands of years. The research, directed by the University of Oxford and University College Cork in collaboration with the Laboratory of Prehistory at St Petersburg, Russia, and funded by Science Foundation Ireland was recently published in PNAS Online Early Edition. This finding challenges previous claims that late Neanderthals survived until 30,000 years ago in the northern Caucasus, meaning that late Neanderthals and modern humans were not likely to experience any significant period of co-existence.

Irish Genealogy News: TIGS transcribes NY burial records with place of origin A unique and valuable new resource has resulted from a project managed by Troy Irish Genealogy Society (TIGS): transcriptions of 12,731 records from the recently rediscovered interment book for St John's Cemetery in Albany, NY. Just under one third (3,895) of the records relate to Irish-born individuals and, remarkably, all but 500 entries identify the county from which they originate. This collection, which contains records from 1841 to the late 1880s, could throw open the research doors to many Americans descended from Irish immigrants who fled the famine. Here's a breakdown of the Irish identified in the interment records with their home county in Ireland: The records, along with further details of the cemetery and how the book was rediscovered, are freely searchable on the Troy Irish Genealogy Society website. Hearty congratulations to the Society and its members for making these priceless records available.

Bunnies implicated in the demise of Neanderthals - 27 February 2013 BLAME it on the bunnies. The debate over what Neanderthals ate, and how it may have led to their demise, has turned to rabbits. Which, it is now claimed, they did not feast on. Signs that our extinct cousins hunted dolphins and seals were presented in 2008 as evidence of their sophistication. But, experts claimed in 2009, they weren't clever enough to catch fish or birds – which could have given our ancestors an edge. Then came the discovery of fish scales and feathers on Neanderthal tools. Now, John Fa of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust in Trinity, Jersey, says the remains in caves around Europe became dominated by rabbits rather than large game around the time Neanderthals went extinct (Journal of Human Evolution, doi.org/kkn). It's not clear why they would have had more trouble changing prey, says Fa.

Genealogy | Richland Library Stop by the Walker Local and Family History Center for: Family history document beginner packets. Advice and recommendations to further your research efforts. Search the online local obituary index and request retrieval of archived obituaries. Search the genealogy databases listed below. Free to Richland Library card holders. Need an obituary from the Columbia area? Search the Online Obituary Index or Request an Obituary The research tools listed below include links to South Carolina online resources and provide library patrons with access to library-supported national genealogy databases.

Neanderthals were ancient mariners - life - 29 February 2012 IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow. Now, George Ferentinos of the University of Patras in Greece says we can rule out the former. Ferentinos compiled data that showed sea levels were 120 metres lower 100,000 years ago, because water was locked up in Earth's larger ice caps. Ferentinos thinks Neanderthals had a seafaring culture for tens of thousands of years. New Scientist Not just a website! More from the web

The Online Genealogist

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