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Education podcast:English as a Second Language Podcast

Education podcast:English as a Second Language Podcast
Related:  Teach & learn English

Wooden Spoon Speculations Copyright © 2014 Emma Gore-Lloyd I found this game on a party games website sometime a couple of years ago. It’s a guessing game that works well in a class of students who are fairly comfortable with each other and have a good sense of humour. Students can use it to practise speculative language. Equipment needed: 2 wooden spoons; one scarf/blindfold First, elicit speculative language from the students, eg. Next, ask for or choose a volunteer (probably best to choose one of the most outgoing students here). Give the blindfolded student the two wooden spoons, one in each hand. Once they’ve made their guess, they can take off the blindfold and see if they were right. Replay the game with the second volunteer as the blindfolded player and choose another student to be guessed, until they’ve all had a go (or at least all the ones that are up for it). I played this with my fairly shy group of teenage FCE students and they played it enthusiastically. Share this with other teachers: Like this:

Write Back Soon Write Back Soon deals with a particular aspect of the English language which learners find notoriously difficult: phrasal verbs. In each episode, teacher Gerry introduces an email written between Scottish students Duncan and Lisa: Lisa is studying in Canada at the moment, and Duncan is back home in Scotland, and they are conducting a long-distance relationship by email. Through their regular emails, learners follow their story, and hear several phrasal verbs in use in each episode. Gerry then explains how each phrasal verb is used. This ground-breaking review of phrasal verbs has been met with great enthusiasm by learners of English around the world.

The Best of British - British Slang Ace - If something is ace it is awesome. I used to hear it a lot in Liverpool. Kids thought all cool stuff was ace, or brill. Aggro - Short for aggravation, it's the sort of thing you might expect at a football match. In other words - trouble! All right? Anti-clockwise - The first time I said that something had gone anti-clockwise to someone in Texas I got this very funny look. Any road - Up north (where they talk funny!!) Arse - This is a word that doesn't seem to exist in America. Arse about face - This means you are doing something back to front. Arse over elbow - This is another way of saying head over heels but is a little more descriptive. Arse over tit - Another version of arse over elbow, but a bit more graphic! Arsehole - Asshole to you. Arseholed - Drunk! As well - You chaps say also when we would say "too" or "as well". Ass - Your backside, but mostly a donkey! Au fait - Another one of those French expressions that have slipped into the English language. Baccy - Tobacco.

Telephoning in English Here are some useful tips and phrases for making telephone calls in English. Spelling on the phone If you need to spell your name, or take the name of your caller, the biggest problem is often saying vowel sounds: 'a' is pronounced as in 'may''e' is pronounced as in 'email' or 'he''i' is pronounced as in 'I' or 'eye''o' is pronounced as in 'no''u' is pronounced as 'you' Saying consonants'g' is pronounced like the 'j' in 'jeans''j' is pronounced as in 'DJ' or 'Jane''w' is pronounced 'double you''x' is pronounced 'ex''y' is pronounced 'why''z' is pronounced 'zed' (rhymes with 'bed' in British English), or 'zee' (rhymes with 'sea' in American English). Tip: Keep a note of how you say these letters by your telephone. Giving numbers Here's a phone number: 0171 222 3344 And here's how to say it:"Oh-one-seven-one, triple two, double three, double four." "Zero-one-seven-one, triple two, double three, double four." Each digit is spoken separately, unless it's a double or triple. Saying email addresses

TESL/TEFL/TESOL/ESL/EFL/ESOL Links - ESL ESLThis is a sub-page ofThe Internet TESL Journal'sTESL/TEFL/TESOL/ESL/EFL/ESOL LinksLinks of Interest to Teachers and Students of English as a Second Language There are currently 10192 registered links.Main Page | Links for Students | Links for Teachers | What's New Categories: Activities for ESL Students (The Internet TESL Journal)

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask- question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful- dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant Beautiful - pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling Begin - start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate Brave - courageous, fearless, dauntless, intrepid, plucky, daring, heroic, valorous, audacious, bold, gallant, valiant, doughty, mettlesome

Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Copyright © 1997-2010 by The Internet TESL Journal Pages from this site should not be put online elsewhere.Permission is not required to link directly to any page on our site as long as you do not trap the page inside a frame.

GCSE English: Revision Questions Adele's ESL Corner - Your free online English language website Sing-along Songs One of the most fun group participation activities for family and friends is to engage in sing-along songs. The essence of a sing-along song is that it has a simple enough melody and memorable lyrics for everyone to easily learn. Many of these popular songs have been around for over a century and are taught to children as part of their grade school music education. "Michael Row the Boat Ashore" is a very well known sing-along song. It was a traditional folk song written in the 1860s that became a huge hit in the early 1960s by The Highwaymen. The following sing-along songs are widely known and appreciated by all ages. She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain Not many songs over a century old are still as popular as "She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain," which originated in the late nineteenth century by an unknown composer. What A Wonderful World The song "What A Wonderful World" was first popularized in 1967 by Louis Armstrong and in 1999 was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

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