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Education podcast:English as a Second Language Podcast

Education podcast:English as a Second Language Podcast
Related:  Teach & learn English

Wooden Spoon Speculations Copyright © 2014 Emma Gore-Lloyd I found this game on a party games website sometime a couple of years ago. It’s a guessing game that works well in a class of students who are fairly comfortable with each other and have a good sense of humour. Students can use it to practise speculative language. Equipment needed: 2 wooden spoons; one scarf/blindfold First, elicit speculative language from the students, eg. Next, ask for or choose a volunteer (probably best to choose one of the most outgoing students here). Give the blindfolded student the two wooden spoons, one in each hand. Once they’ve made their guess, they can take off the blindfold and see if they were right. Replay the game with the second volunteer as the blindfolded player and choose another student to be guessed, until they’ve all had a go (or at least all the ones that are up for it). I played this with my fairly shy group of teenage FCE students and they played it enthusiastically. Share this with other teachers: Like this:

Adele's ESL Corner - Your free online English language website Telephoning in English Here are some useful tips and phrases for making telephone calls in English. Spelling on the phone If you need to spell your name, or take the name of your caller, the biggest problem is often saying vowel sounds: 'a' is pronounced as in 'may''e' is pronounced as in 'email' or 'he''i' is pronounced as in 'I' or 'eye''o' is pronounced as in 'no''u' is pronounced as 'you' Saying consonants'g' is pronounced like the 'j' in 'jeans''j' is pronounced as in 'DJ' or 'Jane''w' is pronounced 'double you''x' is pronounced 'ex''y' is pronounced 'why''z' is pronounced 'zed' (rhymes with 'bed' in British English), or 'zee' (rhymes with 'sea' in American English). Tip: Keep a note of how you say these letters by your telephone. Giving numbers Here's a phone number: 0171 222 3344 And here's how to say it:"Oh-one-seven-one, triple two, double three, double four." "Zero-one-seven-one, triple two, double three, double four." Each digit is spoken separately, unless it's a double or triple. Saying email addresses

Sing-along Songs One of the most fun group participation activities for family and friends is to engage in sing-along songs. The essence of a sing-along song is that it has a simple enough melody and memorable lyrics for everyone to easily learn. Many of these popular songs have been around for over a century and are taught to children as part of their grade school music education. "Michael Row the Boat Ashore" is a very well known sing-along song. It was a traditional folk song written in the 1860s that became a huge hit in the early 1960s by The Highwaymen. The following sing-along songs are widely known and appreciated by all ages. She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain Not many songs over a century old are still as popular as "She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain," which originated in the late nineteenth century by an unknown composer. What A Wonderful World The song "What A Wonderful World" was first popularized in 1967 by Louis Armstrong and in 1999 was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Copyright © 1997-2010 by The Internet TESL Journal Pages from this site should not be put online elsewhere.Permission is not required to link directly to any page on our site as long as you do not trap the page inside a frame.

Top 10 Essential Web Tools For Project-Based Learning Making learning interactive has always been difficult for educators. Students rarely want to collaborate and get involved in discussions, because most of them are afraid of making mistakes and saying something wrong. Luckily for all of us, the emergence of technology used in classrooms has made educators able of making the learning process interactive. Blending the traditional textbooks with innovative web tools that inspire collaboration will be the wisest thing you’ve ever done for your students. The goal of project-based learning is to enable your students to put the things they have learned into practice and develop valuable skills through the project development. By implementing the usage of digital tools into the classroom, the students will get engaged and interested into each other’s opinions. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thumbnail image via 123rf.com

Reported Speech Exercises Reported Speech Exercises Here's a list of all the reported speech exercises on this site: (Click here to read the explanations about reported speech) Reported Statements: Reported Questions: Reported Orders and Requests: Reported Requests and Orders Exercise (intermediate) (in PDF here) Mixed Exercises: Return to reported speech explanations from reported speech exercises. LoginSubscribe to PEG+What's New?

Handouts Online: EFL / ESL Worksheets, activities and lesson plans Discussion topics for English language learners Prepare for Discussion 28 topics-- for the Higher Intermediate & Advanced levels----START 01 Alternative Beliefs 02 Animal Welfare 03 The Arts 04 Crime & Punishment 05 Cultural Differences 06 Economics 07 Education 08 Environment 09 Fashion 10 Food 11 Health 12 Holidays 13 Language Learning 14 Male & Female Roles 15 Marriage 16 The Media 17 Political Systems 18 Religion 19 Rich & Poor World 20 Science & Technology 21 Society 22 Sport 23 Tradition 24 Transport 25 Travel 26 Violence 27 Work 28 Youth & Old Age -----© Ted Power Glossary of Ten Discussion Techniques - detailed index List of the 28 Topics for Discussion [ This list of the 28 topics can be printed out for learners' or teachers' reference ] -- Higher Intermediate vocabulary and discussion - topics 1 to 10: 1. -- Higher Intermediate vocabulary and discussion - topics 11 to 20: 11. -- Higher Intermediate vocabulary and discussion - topics 21 to 28: 21. Return to the TOP of this page

Qué es una rúbrica y cómo se utiliza en clase Qué es una rúbrica y cómo se utiliza en clase Aunque no siempre ha sido así, actualmente, una rúbrica es un instrumento de evaluación que puede ser utilizado por las personas que evalúan o las que son evaluadas en el contexto del aula. La rúbrica se define como un instrumento que tiene tres características imprescindibles: Criterios de evaluaciónCategorías de ejecución (de la más pobre a la más completa)Especificaciones concretas de como se puede alcanzar cada categoría de evaluación y ejecución. Es muy importante tener claro que la rúbrica es un instrumento para una acción formativa y no va a aumentar el aprendizaje de los alumnos si el docente no lo acompaña de unas estrategias concretas de aprendizaje. Todas estas acciones apoyan el uso de la rúbrica para fomentar la autoevaluación en el aula y así dar pie a poder mejorar el proceso de aprendizaje. Para profundizar más, desde iDidactic os recomendamos consultar los siguientes links:

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