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Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia
Animation of the fusiform area, the area damaged in prosopagnosia. Prosopagnosia /ˌprɒsəpæɡˈnoʊʒə/ (Greek: "prosopon" = "face", "agnosia" = "not knowing"), also called face blindness,[1] is a cognitive disorder of face perception where the ability to recognize faces is impaired, while other aspects of visual processing (e.g., object discrimination) and intellectual functioning (e.g., decision making) remain intact. The term originally referred to a condition following acute brain damage (acquired prosopagnosia), but a congenital or developmental form of the disorder also exists, which may affect up to 2.5% of the population.[2] The specific brain area usually associated with prosopagnosia is the fusiform gyrus,[3] which activates specifically in response to faces. The functionality of the fusiform gyrus allows most people to recognize faces in more detail than they do similarly complex inanimate objects. There are two types of prosopagnosia: acquired and congenital (developmental).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosopagnosia

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Asthenopia Asthenopia (aesthenopia) from the Greek word "asthen-opia : ασθεν-ωπία" or eye strain is an ophthalmological condition that manifests itself through nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, pain in or around the eyes, blurred vision, headache and occasional double vision. Symptoms often occur after reading, computer work, or other close activities that involve tedious visual tasks. When concentrating on a visually intense task, such as continuously focusing on a book or computer monitor, the ciliary muscle tightens. This can cause the eyes to get irritated and uncomfortable.

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Associative visual agnosia Inferior view of the brain, depicting the cerebral lobes. Lesions on the occipito-temporal lobes are correlated with associative agnosia. Overview[edit] An agnosia that affects hearing, auditory sound agnosia, is broken into subdivisions based on level of processing impaired, and a semantic-associative form is investigated within the auditory agnosias.[2] Causes[edit]

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