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Librarian in Black – Sarah Houghton

Librarian in Black – Sarah Houghton

http://librarianinblack.net/librarianinblack/

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Reading Across a Dozen Literacies This article will define each literacy while giving examples of "reading" within each category. It takes special skills to read a swamp or a beach or a desert area. These skills also differ from region to region as the flora and fauna shift. Most of us have heard of swimmers caught in rip tides because they did not know how to read the signs or of visitors enjoying tidal flats suddenly swept up in an incoming tide much larger than anything they knew back home. Artistic Literacy Anyone can look at a painting, a photograph or a movie. A list of top 50 Books blogs by Blog Rank Are you a bookworm who just can’t end the day without reading a page? Do you love reading fictional novels or philosophical, intellectual, non-fiction stuff? If you are any of these, then you might have been scouring around the Internet for the top book blogs.

Public Library Services Hashtags are used in social media to connect people in discussing the same topic, even if they don’t know each other. For example, during the current test cricket series, people have been commenting using the #ashes hashtag. The British Library uses hashtags for all their exhibitions. Their current exhibition Georgians revealed uses #BLGeorgians to connect promotion, and people talking about the exhibition.

Professional Tools ALA TechSource, an imprint of the American Library Association, publishes Library Technology Reports and Marshall Breeding’s Smart Libraries Newsletter. Library Technology Reports, published in eight issues annually, helps librarians make informed decisions about technology products and projects. Reports are authored by experts in the field and may address the application of technology to library services, provide thorough overviews of library technology, offer evaluative descriptions of specific products or product classes, or cover emerging technology. Smart Libraries Newsletter, published monthly, offers Marshall Breeding’s news and analysis on products, vendors, and new developments in the library automation marketplace. Subscribers receive timely coverage of significant events about library technology products and organizations.

Phil Bradley's weblog To the Chair of a professional library interest group, I’m angry, depressed, sad and disappointed that I need to write this open letter to you. You sent a member of your group onto two courses that I ran, and the total cost was £198. a Fantasy Reader: Round of covers With many covers appearing around the web, it's time for another round of covers! First up is the UK cover art for Brandon Sanderson upcoming novel, Steelheart. The art style is the same as the previous UK release for the author. I like the style but I prefer the US art. Nailing the Library Interview « Mr. Library Dude Getting that librarian position can be a daunting process. First, you write your cover letter and resume. You wait. Maybe you wait some more? Official Blog of the Public Library Association As the day wound down, attendance at the Readers’ Advisory Tool Kit III was a bit down, though still very decent. Those who lasted the full day of PLA got to hear three well-known librarians suggest more ways to get books into the hands of readers. With her section “Promoting the Backlist,” Georgine Olson of Fairbanks North Star Borough Public Library and Regional Center in Fairbanks, Alaska (is the library stationary in landscape to fit the letterhead?)

On Libraries, Rhetoric, Poetry, History, & Moral Philosophy You know when someone at Scholarly Kitchen thinks your anti-open access rant is excessive you’ve crossed some sort of threshold. You also know that when a biologist and a co-founder of the Public Library of Science bothers to give your article a thorough fisking, you have people’s attention. Even Roy Tennant seems a little riled, and he’s usually pretty calm. Jeffrey Beall has managed to publish an anti-open access article in an open access journal that’s so poorly argued that I wonder if he’ll later use the publication as an example of how bad OA publishing can be.

A Zen Librarian: Bluestem and Monarch Shelf Talkers Over the summer, I saw an image, I think it was Jon Schu's library blog, that had what I call "shelf talkers." Basically they are little cards that are taped to the bookcase where the books are housed. The cards have a picture of the book, a synopsis of the story and a note about the contest the book is a part of. I created Bluestem and Monarch shelf talkers. I hope others might find them as helpful. It's all about the services I saw the announcement a few weeks ago about the demise of MARBI and the creation of the new ALCTS/LITA Metadata Standards Committee. My first reaction was ‘uh oh,’ and I flashed back to the beginnings of the DCMI Usage Board. The DCUB still exists, but in a sort of limbo, as DCMI reorganizes itself after the recent change of leadership. I was a charter member, and, with Rebecca Guenther, wrote up the original proposal for the organization of the group.

The List List #112 Our weekly round-up of the best bookish lists floating around the internet. This installment of The List List is sponsored by Random House Audio. Visit TryAudiobooks.com to get recommendations and download a free audiobook. at Flavorwire, 5 of the Best Literary Frenemy Pairings Cool Quotes about Libraries, Books, and Knowledge, compiled from Ex Libris All too often, especially in larger settings, bureaucracy creates tidy little job descriptions into which staff are jailed. What this mathematically driven system does not take into account is that human beings are complex creatures with more than one ability. A person may be a whiz at answering reference questions, but what if they can also sew a very convincing Sponge Bob costume? Will the Youth Services Department go without this asset because costuming is not in the job description for reference?

The Best Books on Writing, NYC, Animals, and More: A Collaboration with the New York Public Library By Maria Popova As an enormous lover and patron of public libraries, I was beyond delighted when the fine folks at the New York Public Library asked me to curate a selection of books for their bookstore and gave me free range to do whatever I wished. My original thought was to do a single reading list around a specific theme, much like I had been doing for the TED bookstore. But my chronic maximalism soon kicked in — the single reading list swelled into four reading lists (wisdom on writing, great reads about New York City, heart- and brain-stirring books on pets and animals, and timeless treats for young readers) and the simple tabletop display became an elaborate installation in the bookstore’s main window.

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