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The International Dyslexia Association Promoting literacy through research, education and advocacy

Join our Mailing List Knowledge and Practice Standards for Teachers of Reading IDA created a dyslexia resource kit, Dyslexia in the Classroom: What Every Teacher Needs to Know, for educators everywhere. The kit can help raise awareness, share best practices, and be a resource to the school’s administration and staff. Click on the graphic to download your kit today! Do you think you or your child may have dyslexia?

http://www.interdys.org/

Related:  Literacy Idea Sites

Reading Goes Digital – 6 Ways Technology Enhances Reading Practices — Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Over the past several years, we at Subtext have talked to and observed teachers in schools at all different stages of technology integration. While some teachers have class sets of iPads or Chromebooks, others have only a few classroom computers, or access to a school computer lab. Despite these differences, we would submit a simple principle that helps teachers be successful in their efforts: When literacy instruction goes digital across the curriculum, reading can be transformed as it becomes more impactful, engaging, and effective for students.

Special Education and the Concept of Neurodiversity Welcome to New Horizons for Learning - a leading web resource for identifying and communicating successful strategies for educational practice. The Johns Hopkins School of Education does not vet or endorse any information contained on the New Horizons website. Information posted on New Horizons prior to January 1, 2014 can be repurposed as long as the repurposing party provides attribution to the original author of the material being used. Information posted on New Horizons after January 1, 2014 is considered open access information and can be repurposed without attribution to the original author. In all cases, attribution should be given to the New Horizons website.

Community Club Home Community Club Firefighter Level A, Community Club What happens when the fire alarm rings? Exclusive: First Autistic Presidential Appointee Speaks Out When Ari Ne’eman walked onstage at a college campus in Pennsylvania in June, he looked like a handsome young rabbi presiding over the bar mitzvah of a young Talmudic scholar. In truth, Ne’eman was facilitating a different kind of coming-of-age ceremony. Beckoning a group of teenagers to walk through a gateway symbolizing their transition into adult life, he said, “I welcome you as members of the autistic community.”

View Entire Archive by Barry Duncan, PhD and Scott Miller, PhD Barry Duncan and Scott Miller provide a comprehensive summary of the Outcome-Informed, Client-Directed approach and a detailed, practical overview of its application in clinical practice. by Tab Ballis How to Improve Reading Comprehension with Apps September is national literacy month. For the past ten years, U.S. illiteracy rates have remained troublingly high. According to a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education, 21% of U.S. adults can't read at a 5th grade level, and 19% of students graduate from high school without being able to read. Students with difficult living conditions, learning disabilities, or limited exposure to books have a high risk of illiteracy and may need more academic support than their peers.

Neurodiversity rights activist Jonathan Mooney: "You're not broken" Jean Winegardner Jonathan Mooney You wouldn’t know to look at him that Jonathan Mooney is a man with a disability. He is young, handsome, and speaks with an easy style and a confidence that doesn’t reflect early, dire warnings of jail or a life flipping burgers that his early teachers predicted for him. To look at him, you wouldn’t know that he is an energetic advocate for what he calls “a defining rights movement for the 21st century,” the neurodiversity rights movement. Mooney has ADHD and dyslexia and fought his way back from dropping out of school during 6th grade and planning his own suicide to become a published author and travel the country as a dynamic speaker on the subject of disabled children and neurodiversity.

The Major Archetypes The HeroThe word hero is Greek, from a root that means "to protect and to serve". A Hero is someone who is willing to sacrifice his own needs on behalf of others, like a shepherd who will sacrifice to protect and serve his flock. The root of the idea of Hero is connected with self-sacrifice. Magic Spoons Why hello there my fellow blogger buddies! Were you wondering if I fell off the face of the Earth? If I did not, in fact, survive the madness of the holiday season? If a pack of rabid kindergarteners ate me alive??!! DON'T FRET!! Improving literacy outcomes for individuals with complex communication needs Challenge Literacy skills are tremendously important in today’s society; they provide a means to enhance education, improve employment opportunities, develop social relationships, access the Internet, foster personal expression, and provide enjoyable leisure activities. Literacy skills are even more important for individuals who have complex communication needs and have limited speech.

7 Stupid Thinking Errors You Probably Make The brain isn’t a flawless piece of machinery. Although it is powerful and comes in an easy to carry container, it has it’s weaknesses. A field in psychology which studies these errors, known as biases. Although you can’t upgrade your mental hardware, noticing these biases can clue you into possible mistakes.How Bias Hurts You If you were in a canoe, you’d probably want to know about any holes in the boat before you start paddling.

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