background preloader

Reinventing the way stories are told

Reinventing the way stories are told

http://futureofstorytelling.org/

Related:  ניומדיה ותרבות רשתStorytelling

The 15 Things I've Learned about Transmedia Storytelling By Ingrid Kopp | Indiewire October 14, 2013 at 2:30PM Ingrid Kopp, the Tribeca Film Institute's Director of Digital Initiatives, recently shared her wisdom garnered over the year's she has spent in the transmedia world in a presentation for the X Media Lab conference in Switzerland. While her initial presentation (available via SlideShare at the bottom of this post) had ten lessons learned, she's expanded on the original list with five additional dollops of wisdom. Take a look! Would you add anything?

Patrizia Soffiati - Google+ - Cos'è una storia? +You Search Images Maps Play How Americans Die By Matthew C. Klein / Bloomberg View / April 17, 2014How Americans Die The mortality rate fell by about 17 percent from 1968 through 2010, years for which we have detailed data.Almost all of this improvement can be attributed to improved survival prospects for men. It looks like progress stopped in the mid-1990s… Mortality rate per 100,000 people …but that’s only because the population has aged a lot since then.

There There — Cowbird Cowbird is a public library of human experience. It consists of a community of storytellers, sharing heartfelt personal stories, focused on a slower kind of self-expression than the frantic world of tweets and social networks. We use these tools (they are part of our consciousness now) but we also feel a craving for a deeper kind of connection, so Cowbird offers a safe and sacred space for this kind of behavior to occur. Stories allow us to untangle experience, make sense of our lives, and find meaning. They are containers for wisdom and lifeboats for memory — helping us not to forget, and then later, not to be forgotten. Cowbird makes it easy for anyone to tell beautiful stories — incorporating text, photography, sound, maps, tags, timelines, characters, roles, and dedications — to keep a diary of life.

Gun Deaths In America Methodology The data in this interactive graphic comes primarily from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Multiple Cause of Death database, which is derived from death certificates from all 50 states and the District of Columbia and is widely considered the most comprehensive estimate of firearm deaths. In keeping with the CDC’s practice, deaths of non-U.S. residents that take place in the U.S. (about 50 per year) are excluded. All figures are averages from the years 2012 to 2014, except for police shootings of civilians, which are from 2014.

Better User Experience With Storytelling - Part One Advertisement Stories have defined our world. They have been with us since the dawn of communication, from cave walls to the tall tales recounted around fires. Story Structure - Policy Viz Once upon a time, there was _____. Every day, _____. One day, _____. Because of that, _____. Because of that, _____. Until finally_____. Voleur de secrets Okay, this rat is leaving the ship. I’m not going to delete it, but I’m not going to use this blog anymore for a while. Maybe later. But after I made that post considering leaving it another 10 people started following, and I am too anxious as a person to feel comfortable with having a personal blog/scrapbook followed by this large a crowd. I’ll probably follow a bunch of people I follow here now and should be easy enough to recognise (I think) but I might just message you a hello from my new tumblr if I remember to! Hmm.

Discussion: Storytelling and success stories I’ve not been able to keep up with all threads but it seems there have been a number of interesting discussions over the past few days covering various aspects of the role of data visualisation and what we should expect from it. Thought I’d join the party late and throw in a few thoughts of my own as I was planning on writing something about these subjects anyway. Firstly, I would recommend you take a look at Moritz Stefaner’s post about the different functions of visualisations – those that tell (or more specifically show) stories and those that don’t. I particularly suggest you read the comment responses at the bottom of the post, I haven’t read them word-for-word but skimming through reveals some good discussions in there. Interestingly, you can see how often the nuances and semantics of the written word are at the root of many disagreements about perspectives when they are actually the same views just articulated differently. The main issue is what does success look like?

Related: