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Questions to guide you in worldbuilding for fantasy or science-fiction — Veronica Sicoe

Questions to guide you in worldbuilding for fantasy or science-fiction — Veronica Sicoe
I’ve been busy worldbuilding this week. It’s one of my favorite things to do in the process of writing sci-fi, and it makes me all giddy and drooly like a kid that’s been dropped into a toybox. Since I revisited my collected materials for the worlds I’m writing in, and have overhauled one of these entirely, I grabbed the opportunity to put together a list of important worldbuilding questions to share with you. Not every author goes about worldbuilding the same way — and that’s perfectly fine, since not every genre needs it, and not every story is focused primarily on the setting. Also, not all aspects of a world or society are equally relevant to that particular plot. But even if you’re only using the setting as a wallpaper, you still need to understand how it works and why, so that you don’t accidentally slip and kill the reader’s suspension of disbelief. So buckle up, and let’s go. Geography 1. Are we on Earth or another planet? 2. History 3. 4. Language 5. 6. Culture 7. 8. Mentality 9.

http://www.veronicasicoe.com/blog/2012/05/13-worldbuilding-questions/

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NaNoWriMo World Building Resources - The Writersaurus FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestRedditTumblrEmailShare So you’ve got the characters figured out and your plot nearly perfect for your NaNoWriMo project this year. So what do you do now? You can’t just twiddle your thumbs until November 1, can you? How about undertaking some moderate world building by checking out the below resources, hand-picked by The Writersaurus? Dig it.

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