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1% rule (Internet culture)

Pie chart showing the proportion of lurkers, contributors and creators under the 90–9–1 principle In Internet culture, the 1% rule is a rule of thumb pertaining to participation in an internet community, stating that only 1% of the users of a website actively create new content, while the other 99% of the participants only lurk. A variant is the "90–9–1 principle" (sometimes also presented as the 89:10:1 ratio),[1] which states that in a collaborative website such as a wiki, 90% of the participants of a community only view content, 9% of the participants edit content, and 1% of the participants actively create new content. Both can be compared with the similar rules known to information science, such as the 80/20 rule known as the Pareto principle, that 20 percent of a group will produce 80 percent of the activity, however the activity may be defined. The actual percentage is likely to vary depending upon the subject matter. Sturgeon's Law

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1%25_rule_(Internet_culture)

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Participation inequality In social sciences, participation inequality consists of difference between levels of participation of various groups in certain activities. Common examples include: In politics, participation inequality typically affects "the kinds of individuals, such as the young, the poor and those with little formal education"[2] who tend to not take the initiative to participate in electoral and related events. State enumeration, such as was done in Canada before the implementation of the National Register of Electors in 1996, "worked to augment voter turnout among all segments of society and thus mitigated a natural tendency toward participation inequality in electoral politics".[2] See also[edit] References[edit]

90-9-1 close Sean founded Ant’s Eye View's Austin practice, where he launched special practices, developed business and oversaw project delivery. He has worked extensively in marketing operations, brand management, customer service, product development, strategy, process design and measurement projects. Before Ant's Eye View, Sean worked with Dell and pioneered a Social Media Model to improve global brand health, customer service models, and Dell's overall culture. The Model has been cited by books, periodicals and university research for its innovation. Sean led strategy and execution of channel mix (online, phone, retail), pricing/promotion, and marketing communications.

Lucid Dreaming By lucid dreaming, you can gain complete control over the one place that no one will ever care about: your imagination. Just The Facts Lucid dreaming is a scientifically proven phenomenon. While some get into lucid dreaming in order to treat chronic nightmares, or to experience all facets of the human experience, approximately 99.8% of people use it as a tool for cheap and interactive 3D porn. A lucid dream is a dream in which the dreamer is aware that he or she is dreaming, and he or she can even choose to control and manipulate his or her dream. Dream, dream, dream. 50 Most Influential Designers in America Ed Tufte A godfather of information design and literally wrote the discipline's bibles. Ben Fry Fry cocreated Processing, the programming language behind today's best data-visualization projects. Eric Rodenbeck Eric Rodenbeck founded Stamen, a data-visualization firm that mapped American military deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan for CNN.

I Point To TED Talks and I Point to Kim Kardashian. That Is All. The Demise of Guys: Why Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It, by Philip Zimbardo and Nikita Duncan. TED Books. Kindle, Nook, iBooks, $2.99 Reviewed by Carl Zimmer Tonight, I want to talk to you about a national crisis. Lurker In Internet culture, a lurker is typically a member of an online community who observes, but does not actively participate.[1][2] The exact definition depends on context. Lurkers make up a large proportion of all users in online communities.[3] Lurking allows users to learn the conventions of an online community before they actively participate, improving their socialization when they eventually de-lurk.[4] However, a lack of social contact while lurking sometimes causes loneliness or apathy among lurkers.[5] Lurkers are referred to using many names, including browsers, read-only participants, non-public participants, legitimate peripheral participants, or vicarious learners.[6] History[edit]

Top 10 Gruesome Methods of Execution Crime Since we started writing down the history of our race, man has frequently come up with revolting methods of killing for punishment. This is a list of the most revolting methods of execution from history. Setting up a new machine for Ruby development It used to be a jarring experience to setup a new machine for development, but progress has paved the dirt road into a silky smooth autobahn. These are the tools we use today: Homebrew: Remember how painful it used to be to get imagemagick installed? Now it takes about a minute. “brew install imagemagick”.

How Anonymous Picks Targets, Launches Attacks, and Takes Powerful Organizations Down Image Design: Giles Revell No one but Hector Xavier Monsegur can know why or when he became Sabu, joining the strange and chaotic Internet collective known as Anonymous. But we know the moment he gave Sabu up. When is the social curation bubble going to burst? You just can’t move for social curation services right now. The biggest noise might be coming from Pinterest, which is growing like a weed — but whether it’s the new-look Delicious, Switzerland’s Paperli, shopping curation site Svpply, image service Mlkshk or another site, the fact is that almost everybody seems to want to help you save and sort and share the things you find on the web right now. With this swirl of activity, then, it’s no surprise to hear that Parisian service Pearltrees — slogan “collect, organize, discover” — has just raised another $6 million of funding, led by local conglomerate Groupe Accueil. The company, which has been running in public since 2009, welcomed the injection of funds as a way to help expand and scale up its system for bookmarking and organizing, which is based around a clustered visual interface. And it needs that scale. Right now Pearltrees is small and has moderate momentum, building up 350,000 users in the past three years.

8,200+ Strong, Researchers Band Together To Force Science Journals To Open Access Evolutionary biologist Michael Eisen made this t-shirt design in support of the Elsevier boycott. Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it free…well, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier’s backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act (RWA). CSS: Taking control of the cascade One of the best things about CSS is the cascade, itself. It can also be one of the worst things about CSS. Styles applied to an HTML element are automatically inherited by their children. Cascading is what allows web designers to set styles and keep them consistent throughout a website without repeating themselves. With a single line of CSS you can, for example, set the typeface that will be applied to every element on every page of your website:

Offline: hard to binge The hyperlink architecture of the internet allows for an only-in-the-21st-century kind of binge. It always starts innocuously enough. Like, one time I saw a video of someone explaining their Yu-Gi-Oh deck, and I didn't understand 90 percent of the words they were using. So I read the Wikipedia entry on Yu-Gi-Oh. And then I watched some more YouTube videos. The Internet’s Social Libraries: Pinterest and Pearltrees - Nvate Miranda Moore Social media is something that most people use every day. Whether we’re updating our statuses on Facebook or taking pictures of our food on Instagram, social media is used to keep up with those near and far from us. A popular trend in social media is a sort of webpage described as a “social library.” A social library is a way of digitally collecting things that interest a person and then sharing them with friends. Pinterest is one well-known social library.

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