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How to Meet WCAG 2.0

How to Meet WCAG 2.0
This web page can be used as a checklist for WCAG 2.0. It provides: All of the requirements (called "success criteria") from Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0Techniques to meet the requirements, which are linked to pages with descriptions, code examples, browser and assistive technology support notes, and tests.Failures to avoid, which are linked to pages with descriptions, examples, and tests."Understanding" links to pages that explain the intent of the guideline or success criterion, how it helps people with different disabilities, key terms, and resources. You can customize what is included in this page by selecting from the Customize this Quick Reference section which Technologies, Levels of success criteria, and Sections of techniques you want to include. For an introduction to WCAG, Techniques, and Understanding documents, see the WCAG Overview. About the Techniques Note: The basis for determining conformance to WCAG 2.0 is the success criteria, not the techniques.

http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/

Related:  Programación webANR Accessibility WCAG 2 Interactive ChecklistDesign Concepts

Tips on Writing for Web Accessibility Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Example: Headings and Subheadings HTML elements provide information on structural hierarchy of a document. Using elements correctly will help convey additional meaning to assistive technology. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 This publication has been funded in part with Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) under contract number ED05CO0039. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S.

Web Content Accessibility Introduction Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) is developed through the W3C process in cooperation with individuals and organizations around the world, with a goal of proving a single shared standard for web content accessibility that meets the needs of individuals, organizations, and governments internationally. The WCAG documents explain how to make web content more accessible to people with disabilities. Web "content" generally refers to the information in a web page or web application, including: natural information such as text, images, and sounds code or markup that defines structure, presentation, etc. Who WCAG is for

Tips on Designing for Web Accessibility This page introduces some basic considerations to help you get started making your user interface design and visual design more accessible to people with disabilities. These tips are good practice to help you meet Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) requirements. Follow the links to the related WCAG requirements, detailed background in the "Understanding" document, guidance from Tutorials, user stories, and more. On this page How to Meet WCAG 2.0 This web page can be used as a checklist for WCAG 2.0. It provides: All of the requirements (called "success criteria") from Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0Techniques to meet the requirements, which are linked to pages with descriptions, code examples, browser and assistive technology support notes, and tests.Failures to avoid, which are linked to pages with descriptions, examples, and tests."Understanding" links to pages that explain the intent of the guideline or success criterion, how it helps people with different disabilities, key terms, and resources. You can customize what is included in this page by selecting from the Customize this Quick Reference section which Technologies, Levels of success criteria, and Sections of techniques you want to include. For an introduction to WCAG, Techniques, and Understanding documents, see the WCAG Overview.

Demo Studio (Mozilla) Mozilla supports a wide variety of exciting open web technologies, and we encourage their use. This page offers links to interesting demonstrations of these technologies, including some that were popular in the Demo Studio, which has since been retired. If you know of a good demonstration or application of open web technology, please add a link to the appropriate section here. 2D GraphicsEdit Justin's demo (works when saved locally) Canvas Accessibility - W3C The power of the Web is in its universality. Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect. Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director and inventor of the World Wide Web The Web is fundamentally designed to work for all people, whatever their hardware, software, language, culture, location, or physical or mental ability.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 This publication has been funded in part with Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) under contract number ED05CO0039. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Additional information about participation in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (WCAG WG) can be found on the Working Group home page.

Mobile Web Development The mobile web refers to access to the world wide web, i.e. the use of browser-based Internet services, from a handheld mobile device, such as a smartphone or a feature phone, connected to a mobile network or other wireless network. Traditionally, access to the Web has been via fixed-line services on laptops and desktop computers. However, the Web is becoming more accessible by portable and wireless devices. An early 2010 ITU (International Telecommunication Union) report said that with the current growth rates, web access by people on the go — via laptops and smart mobile devices – is likely to exceed web access from desktop computers within the next five years.[1] The shift to mobile Web access has been accelerating with the rise since 2007 of larger multitouch smartphones, and of multitouch tablet computers since 2010. The Mobile Web has also been called Web 3.0, drawing parallels to the changes users were experiencing as Web 2.0 websites proliferated.[2][3][4] Mobile access[edit]

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 This publication has been funded in part with Federal funds from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) under contract number ED05CO0039. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S.

The Common Gateway Interface The Common Gateway Interface, or CGI, is a standard for external gateway programs to interface with information servers such as HTTP servers. The current version is CGI/1.1. CGI Documentation useit.com: Jakob Nielsen on Usability and Web Design June 4, 2017 Typing a password takes twice as long on mobile than on desktop. Follow these 12 guidelines to make registration and login less painful on mobile devices. June 4, 2017 Modal ads, ads that reorganize content, and autoplaying video ads were among the most disliked. Ads that are annoying on desktop become intolerable on mobile. May 28, 2017 Five key steps comprise a standardized framework for customer journey mapping that can be scaled to any scope or timeline. May 21, 2017 When using large-screen images on smaller screens, remove images that don’t add information.

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