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The Most Efficient Energy Under The Sun

The Most Efficient Energy Under The Sun
Price drives our global electrical energy choices. Unfortunately, that price does not include the societal impact of pollution, mountain top removal, fracking, etc. We all like the idea of clean, renewable energy, but until greener alternatives compete directly with fossil fuels on a cost per watt basis the global energy markets will continue to favor fossil fuel based options. Manufactured in volume, Dynamic Spin based solar products hold the promise of driving down the price of solar to a level where it could compete toe-to-toe on an LCOE (Levelized Cost of Energy) with many fossil fuel based alternatives. If you are a Solar manufacturer and would like more information, please contact us. The ABC’s of Dynamic Spin

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V3Solar Spin Cell Clean Power Published on January 24th, 2013 | by Zachary Shahan Quite frankly, if the company’s numbers are correct, this could be some big solar news. (CleanTechnica got the inside scoop due to our sincere “passion” for helping the world, and probably also our status as the top cleantech or clean energy site in the world.) What can you do with an old pallet? So many things! If you ever come across the opportunity to pick up a few pallets take a look at some of the ideas I have come across for recycling old pallets into furniture and other practical and decorative pieces. I would like to mention that the designs below were found at various sources on the Internet. Where possible I have mentioned the original source, but unfortunately too many do not. Princeton’s nanomesh nearly triples solar cell efficiency There is huge potential in solar power. The sun is a giant ball of burning hydrogen in the sky, and it’s going to be sticking around for at least a few more billion years. For all intents and purposes, it’s a free source of energy. Sadly, humanity hasn’t been very good at harnessing its power directly. Our current methods of capturing the sun’s energy are very inefficient.

Biodegradable Urns That Will Turn You Into A Tree After You Die - Let's Start Converting Cemeteries Into Forests March 26, 2014 by EDITOR Biodegradable Urns That Will Turn You Into A Tree After You Die - Let's Start Converting Cemeteries Into Forests A revolution is upon us on Earth to move from a pollution and waste dependent society to one of sustainability and environmentally friendly initiatives. Trees are the lungs of our planet. The more trees we plant, the cleaner our air for generations to come. We are very proud to now offer our audience the Bios Urn, a funerary urn made from biodegradable materials that will turn you into a tree after you die.

Calculation of sun’s position in the sky for each location on the earth at any time of day. Home > Solar tools > Sun Position Back to top Content | Data + Map | Chart Polar | Chart Cartesian | Table | Annual sun path | 101 Gardening Secrets The Experts Never Tell You I like to use natural top soil to start my garden seedlings in. I usually don't use potting soil because it generally does not produce the results I want. I usually fill a large, deep baking pan I have with top soil and bake it for thirty minutes at 350 degrees. This sanitizes the soil and makes sure that no weeds or grass come up in your soil. I usually start on this project in the winter and I fill up a couple of large plastic barrels with lids with the sanitized soil. I fill my trays up with my potting soil and then I plant my seeds.

scientists build the first all-carbon solar cell By Mark Shwartz Mark Shwartz Stanford Professor Zhenan Bao talks about the carbon solar cell research. Stanford University scientists have built the first solar cell made entirely of carbon, a promising alternative to the expensive materials used in photovoltaic devices today. The results are published in today's online edition of the journal ACS Nano. "Carbon has the potential to deliver high performance at a low cost," said study senior author Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford.

Edible Plants to Grow Indoors From farmers’ markets and Community Supported Agriculture, to urban farms and rooftop gardens, to produce delivery services, more and more people across the U.S. are embracing farm-fresh food. And for good reason: Locally grown produce tends to be better for the environment and for local communities than its store-bought counterparts. Growing food at home also ensures that growers know exactly where their food comes from and how it was grown (no need to worry about deceptive food labeling).

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