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National Geographic: Egypt Pyramids

National Geographic: Egypt Pyramids
Writer Carl Hoffman traveled to Egypt in February 2011, a week after popular demonstrations led to the president's resignation. These are his observations. Tourism is Egypt’s second largest source of revenue, bringing in $13 billion in 2010. The Great Pyramid at Giza, after all, is one of the seven ancient wonders of the world. To visit the Pyramids is to be struck dumb by their monumentality, their celebration of the fundamental human need to create. It's even more affecting in the midst of a revolution, when there are no tourists at all. I have visited them before, but this time they felt different. In the empty quiet I had a chance to talk to the horsemen and camel drivers who usually hustle rides to tourists. “We have no work, nothing,” said Ali Abd el Hamid, astride his camel. He and his colleagues ply their trade seven days a week, year in and year out, a profession inherited from their fathers and grandfathers.

http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/egypt/pyramids-at-giza/

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ANGKORWAT Miraculously, very little damage has been made on the Angkor region as a result of the bloody civil that has terrorized the Cambodia for over 30 years. The Khmer Rouge, an extreme-left organization has actively organized guerrilla activities against Prince Sihanouk's government. In 1975, many Buddhist monks who lived in the Angkor temples were massacred along with the majority of the Buddhist population as a result of a "social reorganization". However, Angkor Wat suffered very little structural damage in that attack. Today, archeologists from all over the world are actively involved in the restoration process of the temples.

Egypt - History - From Ancient Times to the Modern Period Egypt, a concise history See Also: Books About Egypt Map of Modern Egypt Ami Isseroff Ramses II ruled from 1279 to 1212 BC and is known for his prodigious building projects, which raised temples, statues and other monuments throughout Egypt. He fought the battle of Qadesh (Kadesh) with the Hittites about 1275 and signed the first Peace Treaty to be recorded in history with the Hittites, in 1259. NOVA Online/Pyramids/Ancient Egypt There are days when the sand blows ceaselessly, blanketing the remains of a powerful dynasty that ruled Egypt 5,000 years ago. When the wind dies down and the sands are still, a long shadow casts a wedge of darkness across the Sahara, creeping ever longer as the north African sun sinks beyond the horizon. This is where our history of Egypt begins, in the shadow of the Great Pyramid of Giza, where stone meets sky as a testament to one of the greatest civilizations on earth. Here, on the plateau of Giza, 2,300,000 blocks of stone, some weighing as much as 9 tons, were used to build an eternal tomb for a divine king. Five thousand years ago, the fourth dynasty of Egypt's Old Kingdom was a highly advanced civilization where the kings, known as pharaohs, were believed to be gods.

How did Egyptians build the pyramids? Construction mystery solved after University of Amsterdam wet sand experiment Scientists say they have finally solved mystery of how the ancient Egyptians built the pyramids. The world has been baffled for thousands of years about just how slave workers transported the massive blocks across the Valley of the Kings in around 2,000BC. Now physicists have come up with a two word answer after years of calculations - 'wet sand'. Dutch researchers have figured out the Egyptians placed heavy objects on a sledge, pulled by hundreds of workers, and simply poured water on the sand in front of it.

Expedition Road Of Bones Imagine an empire, in which center Angkor, lived one million people, where at the same time the population of London was only 50,000 people. An empire which stretched at the zenith of its development from Burma to Vietnam. Angkor was the religious and political center and home to hundreds of temples. Queen Cleopatra VII - Last Pharaoh of Egypt "For (as they say) it was not because her [Cleopatra's] beauty in itself was so striking that it stunned the onlooker, but the inescapable impression produced by daily contact with her: the attractiveness in the persuasiveness of her talk, and the character that surrounded her conversation was stimulating. It was a pleasure to hear the sound of her voice, and she tuned her tongue like a many-stringed instrument expertly to whatever language she chose...." From Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony She may not have been an Egyptian, but she was Egypt's queen, ruling on her own rather than in the name of her husband. Her relationships with the leaders of Rome led to scandals.

Pyramid of Snefru at Maidum Builder of several pyramids, Pharaoh Snefru, secured access to monument-building stone via military victories outside Egypt. Likely influenced by the Step Pyramid of Djoser, Snefru, the first king of the 4th dynasty (time line), began a seven-level stepped pyramid some 35 miles (56 kilometers) south of Saqqara. By the time his workers had reached the fourth or fifth level, Snefru upped the ante to eight steps. The first Egyptian pyramid with an aboveground burial chamber (just above the first step level), the Maidum tomb may represent an effort to raise the chamber closer to the sun god. Another innovation is the archlike design of the burial chamber's walls. Great Pyramid of Khufu at Giza Khufu, son of Snefru and second ruler of the 4th dynasty (time line) moved the royal necropolis to Giza, north of modern-day Cairo. According to ancient Greek historian Herodotus, Khufu (aka Cheops) enslaved his people to build his pyramid. But archaeologists have since disproved his account (see "Who Built the Pyramids?").

Temples of Angkor Wat: The most Famous and Remarkable of all of Cambodia's Ancient Temples The temples of Angkor display a coherent set of architectural and decorative elements. Most of the temples are based on the concept of the "temple mountain", i.e. the architectural representation of the mythical Mount Meru, center of the world and home of the gods. In some cases, the main temple building is shaped as a pyramid, in other cases the roofs of the temple sanctuaries are designed as multi-leveled, stylized mountains. Many are surrounded by a moat, representing the ocean around Mount Meru. Mummies - Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt The British Museum of London, England, has the largest and most comprehensive collection of ancient Egyptian material outside of Cairo. Its spectacular collection consists of more than 100,000 objects. Displays include a gallery of monumental sculpture and the internationally famous collection of mummies and coffins.

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