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Poetry Lovers' Page

Poetry Lovers' Page
This is the age of science, of steel -- of speed and the cement road. The age of hard faces and hard highways. Science and steel demand the medium of prose. Speed requires only the look -- the gesture. What need then, for poetry? Great need!

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Do not stand at my grave and weep - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - StumbleUpon Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep is a poem written in 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye. Although the origin of the poem was disputed until later in her life, Mary Frye's authorship was confirmed in 1998 after research by Abigail Van Buren, a newspaper columnist.[1] Full text[edit] Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there; I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow,

Poetry for Everyday Life The sentence is only worth quoting because in 28 words it contains four metaphors. Economies don’t really gain traction, like a tractor. Momentum doesn’t literally get snuffed out, like a cigarette. George Orwell: Politics and the English Language Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language — so the argument runs — must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes. Now, it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not due simply to the bad influence of this or that individual writer.

100 Great Web Sites for Poetry Lovers We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. The Close Reading of Poetry © G. Kim Blank & Magdalena Kay < > English Department, University of Victoria There is no single way to do a close reading of a poem. Sometimes an impression is a way in; sometimes the “voice” in the poem stands out; sometimes it is a matter of knowing the genre of the poem; sometimes groupings of key words, phrases, or images seem to be its most striking elements; and sometimes it takes a while to get any impression whatsoever. The goal, however, is constant: you want to come to a deeper, “closer” understanding of the poem. There are, nonetheless, steps you can take toward this goal—the first being, obviously, to read the poem very carefully—as well as specific elements you can look for and questions you can ask.

5 Poetry Websites You Can Go To Catch The Best Of Verse As kids we somehow can rhyme words, and we see the beauty around us with innocent eyes. Those are the perfect ingredients to make poets out of us. Alas, puberty and adulthood come surging to spoil the party. The chaos and confusion of post teenage years is hardly the platform to build beautiful verse on. Glossary of Rhymes The following terms occur frequently in discussions of poetry and critical writing, but not with absolute consistency. It may be tempting, simply because the terms are listed here, to get overly scrupulous about fine distinctions between, for example, "identical" and "rich" rhyme, or "broken" as opposed to "linked" rhyme--but these are distinctions that rarely find practical sanction in critical usage and are often much more useful for the writer. Nonetheless, it may be useful to consider the various terms that do appear in the literature. Even more, it may be useful to gather and describe a range of rhymes available in the English language. English is often said to be poor in rhyme, as opposed to, for example, the Romance languages, but this glossary and definition of terms will point to a rich variety of choices. This list is adapted from Poetic Designs, by Stephen Adams (Broadview Press, 1997), and Manual of English Meters, by Joseph Malof (Bloomington: Indiana U Press, 1970).

Free Novels Cyber-Books Read half the novel free - see how Free Online Novels can eventually become a best-selling book. These free novels are books and fictional works presented in their entirety online either as html or a downloadable file; they are available as free online novels from the authors in order to promote their work, seek representation, promote additional work, and/or develop a following. Though these free online novels are not found in the mainstream bookstores, many of them will eventually be discovered for their entertaining and enlightening value not always recognized by mainstream publishing until after a following is established. free novels / anthologies / serials / sneak peeks / virtual novels / non-fiction / something different Last Updated: Dec. 14th, 2005 (12/14/2005)

"Poetry Lovers’ Page also aims to deliver the best of Russian poetry in English translation" by macopa May 23

"From the beginning, Poetry Lovers’ Page has been dedicated to presenting the best samples of poetry possible. Because English is widely used by the international community, we chose English as our language of delivery" by macopa May 23

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