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How to Break Through Your Creative Block: Strategies from 90 of Today’s Most Exciting Creators

How to Break Through Your Creative Block: Strategies from 90 of Today’s Most Exciting Creators
by Maria Popova Refining the machinery of creativity, or what heartbreak and hydraulics have to do with coaxing the muse. What extraordinary energy we expend, as a culture and a civilization, on trying to understand where good ideas come from, how creativity works, its secrets, its origins, its mechanisms, and the five-step action plan for coaxing it into manifestation. And little compares to the anguish that comes with the blockage of creative flow. In 2010, designer and musician Alex Cornell found himself stumped by a creative block while trying to write an article about creative block. Deterred neither by the block nor by the irony, he reached out to some of his favorite artists and asked them for their coping strategies in such an event. Writer Michael Erard teases apart “creative block” and debunks its very premise with an emphasis on creativity as transformation: First of all, being creative is not summoning stuff ex nihilo. Have your heart broken. Get enough sleep! Pretend. Cheers.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/10/01/breakthrough-alex-cornell/

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Personality Disorders - A writer's resource Before you call a type of behaviour a disorder, it should cause enduring patterns that deviate from the expectations of society. These are some of the symptoms of a disorder. Writers need to know about personality disorders if they are going to write about them. 18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently This list has been expanded into the new book, “Wired to Create: Unravelling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind,” by Carolyn Gregoire and Scott Barry Kaufman. Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. Creative thinking is a stable, defining characteristic in some personalities, but it may also change based on situation and context. Inspiration and ideas often arise seemingly out of nowhere and then fail to show up when we most need them, and creative thinking requires complex cognition yet is completely distinct from the thinking process. Neuroscience paints a complicated picture of creativity. As scientists now understand it, creativity is far more complex than the right-left brain distinction would have us think (the theory being that left brain = rational and analytical, right brain = creative and emotional).

Do It: 20 Years of Famous Artists' Irreverent Instructions for Art Anyone Can Make by Maria Popova “Art is something that you encounter and you know it’s in a different kind of space from the rest of your life, but is directly connected to it.” One afternoon in 1993, legendary art critic, curator, and interviewer extraordinaire Hans Ulrich Obrist — mind of great wisdom on matters as diverse as the relationship between patterns and chance and the trouble with “curation” itself — sat down in Paris’s Café Select with fellow co-conspirers Christian Boltanski and Bertrand Lavier, and the do it project was born: A series of instructional procedures by some of the greatest figures in contemporary art, designed for anyone to follow as a sort of DIY toolkit for creating boundary-expanding art.

It’s Always Done This Way 6Share Synopsis Make it a habit to challenge the assumptions you make. Here is an easy exercise that must be done in your head only. The Power of Imagery in Teaching and Writing 808 Flares Twitter 9 Facebook 783 Google+ 10 LinkedIn 6 inShare6 808 Flares × Once upon a time there was a girl who had great admiration for trees, paths, and open spaces. She often went on long, lonely walks accompanied by a willful imagination and a quest for ‘ahas’ m-attacks. Image credit: Joe Ormonde

How Hibernation Works" Every living animal on Earth is burning energy all the time. Physical activities like walking and breathing burn energy. Pumping blood and digesting food burns energy. Anaïs Nin on Writing, the Future of the Novel, and How Keeping a Diary Enhances Creativity: Wisdom from a Rare 1947 Chapbook by Maria Popova “It is in the moments of emotional crisis that human beings reveal themselves most accurately.” In December of 1946, Anaïs Nin was invited to give a lecture on writing at Dartmouth, which received an overwhelming response. The following summer, after receiving countless requests, Nin adapted the talk in chapbook titled On Writing, which she printed at her own Gremor Press — the small publishing house Nin founded in 1942 out of disillusionment with mainstream publishing, which led her to teach herself letterpress and self-publish a handful of elegant manually typeset books with gorgeous engravings by her husband. On Writing, in which Nin considers the future of the novel and reflects on what keeping her famous diaries since the age of eleven taught her about writing, was published in a limited edition of 1,000 copies, 750 of which were for sale. Only a few are known to survive.

NeuroKnitting by Varvara Guljajeva , Mar Canet , and Sebastian Mealla Special thanx to Sytse Wierenga! We have plotted brainwave activity into a knitted pattern. A Bias against 'Quirky'? Why Creative People Can Lose Out on Leadership Positions Creativity is good — and more critical than ever in business. So why do so many once-creative companies get bogged down over time, with continuous innovation the exception and not the norm? Wharton management professor Jennifer Mueller and colleagues from Cornell University and the Indian School of Business have gained critical insight into why.

New shape-shifting metals discovered 4 October 2013Last updated at 08:00 ET By Simon Redfern Science writer Crystals seen on the fine scale: River-like patterns form and change as the metal morphs A new shape-changing metal crystal is reported in the journal Nature, by scientists at University of Minnesota. It is the prototype of a new family of smart materials that could be used in applications ranging from space vehicles to electronics to jet engines. The Book of Symbols: Carl Jung’s Catalog of the Unconscious by Kirstin Butler Why Sarah Palin identifies with the grizzly bear, or what the unconscious knows but doesn’t reveal. A primary method for making sense of the world is by interpreting its symbols. We decode meaning through images and, often without realizing, are swayed by the power of their attendant associations. A central proponent of this theory, iconic Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Gustaf Jung, made an academic case for it in the now-classic Man and His Symbols, and a much more personal case in The Red Book.

10 Rules for Creative Projects from Legendary Painter Richard Diebenkorn by Maria Popova “Do search. But in order to find other than what it searched for.” On a recent visit to the Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966 exhibition at San Francisco’s De Young fine arts museum , I was taken with a small, simple sheet of paper handed to visitors, printed on which were the artists’ ten rules for beginning a painting — a sort of manifesto that applies in various degrees and various dimensions to just about every creative or intellectual endeavor, making a fine addition to these favorite manifestos for the creative life . Friend-of- Brain Pickings and frequent contributor Debbie Millman , who knows a thing or two about hand-lettered wisdom and typographic poetics , has kindly rendered Diebenkorn’s script here in her signature script — please enjoy: Complement this with Salvador Dalí’s creative credo .

100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design by Maria Popova From visual puns to the grid, or what Edward Tufte has to do with the invention of the fine print. Design history books abound, but they tend to be organized by chronology and focused on concrete -isms. From publisher Laurence King, who brought us the epic Saul Bass monograph, and the prolific design writer Steven Heller with design critic Veronique Vienne comes 100 Ideas that Changed Graphic Design — a thoughtfully curated inventory of abstract concepts that defined and shaped the art and craft of graphic design, each illustrated with exemplary images and historical context.

Nine Steps for Creating and Maintaining Team Ownership of Ideas and Goals As a leader you know results and productivity are higher when people are committed to their work. You also know higher levels of commitment or engagement also increase job satisfaction, safety performance and focus while reducing on-the-job stress and turnover. Commitment, engagement or buy-in – whatever you want to call – it’s a good thing.

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