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How to Be Happier at Work: 10 Tips

How to Be Happier at Work: 10 Tips
Happiness--in your business life and your personal life--is often a matter of subtraction, not addition. Consider, for example, what happens when you stop doing the following 10 things: 1. Blaming. People make mistakes. So you blame them for your problems. But you're also to blame. Taking responsibility when things go wrong instead of blaming others isn't masochistic, it's empowering--because then you focus on doing things better or smarter next time. And when you get better or smarter, you also get happier. 2. No one likes you for your clothes, your car, your possessions, your title, or your accomplishments. Sure, superficially they might seem to, but superficial is also insubstantial, and a relationship that is not based on substance is not a real relationship. Genuine relationships make you happier, and you'll only form genuine relationships when you stop trying to impress and start trying to just be yourself. 3. 4. Interrupting isn't just rude. Want people to like you? 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

6 Habits of Remarkably Likable People When you meet someone, after, "What do you do?" you're out of things to say. You suck at small talk, and those first five minutes are tough because you're a little shy and a little insecure. But you want to make a good impression. You want people to genuinely like you. Here's how remarkably likeable people do it: They lose the power pose. I know: Your parents taught you to stand tall, square your shoulders, stride purposefully forward, drop your voice a couple of registers, and shake hands with a firm grip. It's great to display nonverbal self-confidence, but go too far and it seems like you're trying to establish your importance. No matter how big a deal you are you pale in comparison to say, oh, Nelson Mandela. Clinton takes a step forward (avoiding the "you must come to me" power move); Mandela steps forward with a smile and bends slightly forward as if, ever so slightly, to bow (a clear sign of deference and respect in nearly every culture); Clinton does the same. You meet someone.

How to Get Hired for Any Job 10 great questions you need to address so you can get hired. We think these tips are right on target and are happy to share with our readers what Christina has to say. Christina Archer is a career agent, expert resume writer, entrepreneur, and author. Every candidate in the job market must be dedicated to out-performing their competition. With record number of applicants per opening, job seekers must tighten their interviewing skills, and give the employer what they need. This poses the question: What are companies looking for in their next hire? 1.How are you going to make money for the employer? 2.Can save the company money? 3.How will you save the new employer time? 4.Can you make the work easier? 5.Are you able to solve a specific problem? 6.What can you contribute to build relationships, brand, and image with customers, vendors, and the public? 7.Are you able to expand the company’s business? 8.How can the company attract new customers? Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

Why Face-To-Face Meetings Are Overrated You know the feeling. Everyone’s sitting around a table, ideas are building on ideas, and intellectual sparks are lighting up the room. It’s tempting to think that this kind of magic only happens when people can see and touch each other. Let’s assume for a second that that’s true: Breakthrough ideas only happen when people are interacting face-to-face. Given that, you’re only going to frustrate yourself and everyone else if you summon the brain trust too frequently for those "a-ha!" This is why at 37signals we don’t meet in person all that often. But what about those spur-of-the-moment rays of brilliance? By rationing in-person meetings, their stature is elevated to that of a rare treat. Reprinted from the book Remote: Office Not Required by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson.

12 Choices to Transform Your Life Over the years I have come to believe that life is about choices. And the choices you make eventually shape your day, shape your views, shape your experiences, shape your thoughts and shape your life… There are some life choices over which you have no control or which others will make for you – like when and where you are born, the family you are born to, your life during childhood, the school you went to, etc. etc. etc. Beyond that, there are several other important choices that you make in life. 1. Learning is a choice which you make consciously or unconsciously. 2. The closeness or distances you choose to maintain with family (immediate and beyond) affects your life. 3. Your overall health is a function of many things – the key determinants being the diet you consume and the nature of exercise you ensure on a regular basis. 4. The place you live affects every dimension of your life, whether or not you acknowledge it. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. This post is dedicated to my parents.

10 Ways You Should Never Describe Yourself Picture this: You meet someone new. "What do you do?" he asks. "I'm an architect," you say. "Oh, really?" he answers. "Maybe," you reply. "Oh wow," he says. And you're off. You sound awesome. Now picture this: You meet someone new. "I'm a passionate, innovative, dynamic provider of architectural services who uses a collaborative approach to create and deliver outstanding customer experiences." And he's off, never to be seen again... because you sound like a pompous ass. Do you--whether on your website, or more likely on social media accounts--describe yourself differently than you do in person? Do you use hacky clichés and overblown superlatives and breathless adjectives? Do you write things about yourself you would never have the nerve to actually say? If so, it's time for a change. Here are some words that are great when used by other people to describe you, but you should never use to describe yourself: "Motivated." "Authority." If you have to say you're an authority, you aren't. "Innovative."

7 Not So Obvious Habits To Maximize Your Productivity I was a big fan of productivity, and, in some respects, I still am. I’ve been a very early adopter of GTD, and, for years, I did my weekly reviews with the discipline of a zen monk. But, eventually, I hit a roadblock. GTD is about getting things “done”, but in life we have much more to experience than “doing”. So, I confess I fell out from the GTD wagon. But enough with all this shameless self-promotion intro. So, instead of doing a presentation of the Assess – Decide – Do framework, I chose to isolate only 7 simple tips for today’s post. As a matter of fact, they’re even organized as such. 1. I firmly believe that the art of ignorance should be taught in schools. Especially on Mondays, when all the previous week unprocessed stuff seems to crash on us, try to apply this. Slash out Twitter, Facebook, email. 2. Each tiny task that you finish is an achievement. Tuesdays are great for this habit, because they’re the first link after the week hast started. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Business Plans Are a Waste of Time. Here's What to Do Instead If you're taking time to carefully perfect a business plan to help ensure your company's model is sound and that it will be a success--stop. That's the word from William Hsu, c0-founder and managing partner at start-up accelerator MuckerLab. Hsu, who's been both a successful entrepreneur and an executive at AT&T and eBay, says that starting a company is "a career for really irrational people. In all probability, whatever the idea is will fail. Building a reality distortion field is how entrepreneurs convince themselves and their employees that this is a good idea." With that in mind, he advises: 1. A great team trumps a great idea every time, Hsu says. In either case, having great team members can fill in any areas where the entrepreneur lacks strength, he says. 2. "Whatever hypothesis you have about the market, it's probably wrong by definition," he says. Then, he says, pivot and reconfigure on the basis of that market response. 3. Does that mean you should never look ahead?

50 Things Everyone Should Know by Mark and Angel Self-reliance is a vital key to living a healthy, productive life. To be self-reliant one must master a basic set of skills, more or less making them a jack of all trades. Contrary to what you may have learned in school, a jack of all trades is far more equipped to deal with life than a specialized master of only one. While not totally comprehensive , here is a list of 50 things everyone should know how to do. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Read the rest of the article

How the Rich Get Rich John D. Rockefeller, America's first billionaire, said, "If your only goal is to become rich, you'll never achieve it." Easy for him to say, but his point is well taken: If the only thing you care about is making money, no matter how much money you make it will never be enough. Still, even though we all define and calculate success differently, most of us would like wealth to factor into our equations. To find out how, check out the 400 Individual Tax Returns Reporting the Largest Adjusted Gross Incomes, an annual report issued by the IRS. (The latest report is for 2009, which to you and me was a long time ago but to the government is really, really up to date.) In 2009 it took $77.4 million in adjusted gross income to make the top 400. A mere $77.4 million only got you in, though; the average earnings were $202.4 million, a lot of money but well down from the $334.8 million average in 2007. Where it gets interesting is how the top 400 made their money: Obvious conclusions:

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