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International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
Origin The IPA was first published in 1888 by the Association Phonétique Internationale (International Phonetic Association), a group of French language teachers founded by Paul Passy. The aim of the organisation was to devise a system for transcribing the sounds of speech which was independent of any particular language and applicable to all languages. A phonetic script for English created in 1847 by Isaac Pitman and Henry Ellis was used as a model for the IPA. Uses The IPA is used in dictionaries to indicate the pronunciation of words. Where symbols appear in pairs, the one on the right represents a voiced consonant, while the one on the left is unvoiced. Download an Excel spreadsheet containing the IPA How the sounds of English are represented by the IPA Recommended books about phonetics and phonology Links Information about the IPA UCLA Phonetics Lab Data IPA charts (include recordings of each phoneme) IPA, International Phonetic Association Free IPA fonts IPA trainer Online IPA input

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/ipa.htm

Related:  sound/IPA symbols

English language, alphabet and pronunciation English is a West Germanic language related to Scots, Dutch, Frisian and German. with a significant amount of vocabulary from Old Norse, Norman French, Latin and Greek, and loanwords from many other languages. Approximately 341 million people speak English as a native language and a further 267 million speak it as a second language in over 104 countries including the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, and the Cook Islands. A brief history of English Old English English evolved from the Germanic languages brought to Britain by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and other Germanic tribes from about the 5th Century AD.

index by writing direction This is an index of the all the writing systems on this site arranged by the direction in which they are written. Some writing systems can be written in a number of different directions, others were originally written in various directions but eventually settled on one direction. Why some writing systems are written in one direction, and others in other directions is a bit of a mystery. It might have something to do with the writing surfaces and implements originally used, fashion, the handedness of the creators of the writing systems, or other factors. The sounds of English and the International Phonetic Alphabet © Tomasz P. Szynalski, Antimoon.com This chart contains all the sounds (phonemes) used in the English language. For each sound, it gives: Paul Meier Dialect Services - IPA charts - dialects - dialect books - phonetics - IPA - phonetics - vowels (If unavailable here, please go to Professor Armstrong’s site, where you will find them duplicated.) The following interactive charts of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) were designed by Eric Armstrong of York University, Toronto, Canada; and voiced by Paul Meier, of the University of Kansas, in Lawrence, Kansas, USA. They are provided as an aid to students of dialects and phonetics. If you are studying dialects with Paul Meier Dialect Services books or booklets, and want to hear one of the “signature sounds” in isolation, or in comparison with other sounds, you may do so using the charts here. Vowels, consonants, ingressives, suprasegmentals, intonation, diacritics, ejectives, implosives, diphthongs, and clicks are demonstrated.

Rongorongo script and the Rapanui language Origin The people of Easter Island were possibly inspired to invent the Rongorongo script after seeing the writing used by the Spanish when they annexed the island in 1770. The Easter Islanders were apparently impressed by the mana or power of the Spaniards' writing.

IPA: Sounds Handbook of the IPA: Sound Recordings The audio files to accompany the language Illustrations in Part 2 of the Handbook of the IPA may be downloaded from the Editor’s web site at the University of Victoria. Click here. The site consists of a large set of .WAV files organized into folders according to language, a few text files containing revisions and additions to some of the Illustrations, graphics files of IPA charts for printing, and an explanation of the site. The language folders may be downloaded individually or as a single "IPA Handbook" folder whose size is approximately 93MB.

ipachart Contents page Contents page for Vowels and Consonants Chapter 1 Chapter 1 book links Clicking on a symbol will take you to a part of the chart where you can hear the corresponding sound. Welsh language, alphabet and pronunciation Welsh is a Celtic language spoken in Wales (Cymru) by about 740,000 people, and in the Welsh colony (yr Wladfa) in Patagonia, Argentina (yr Ariannin) by several hundred people. There are also Welsh speakers in England (Lloegr), Scotland (yr Alban), Canada, the USA (yr Unol Daleithiau), Australia (Awstralia) and New Zealand (Seland Newydd). Number of speakers (Nifer o siaradwyr) At the beginning of the 20th century about half of the population of Wales spoke Welsh as an everyday language. Towards the end of the century, the proportion of Welsh speakers had fallen to about 20%. According to the 2001 census 582,368 people can speak Welsh, 659,301 people can either speak, read or write Welsh, and 797,717 people, 28% of the population, claimed to have some knowledge of the language.

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