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Text Structure

Text Structure
Text Structure The term “text structure” refers to how information is organized in a passage. The structure of a text can change multiple times in a work and even within a paragraph. Students are often required to identify text structures on state reading tests; therefore, it is important that they are given exposure to the various patterns of organization. Cause and Effect:The results of something are explained.Example: The dodo bird used to roam in large flocks across America. Compare and Contrast: two or more things are described. Order of Importance: information is expressed as a hierarchy or in priority.Example: Here are the three worst things that you can do on a date. Problem and Solution: a problem is described and a response or solution is proposed or explained.Example: thousand of people die each year in car accidents involving drugs or alcohol. Sequence / Process Writing: information is organized in steps or a process is explained in the order in which it occurs. Related:  Writing & GrammarWorksheets and lesson plans

Creative Writing Prompts Write a scene that includes a character speaking a different language, speaking in a thick accent, or otherwise speaking in a way that is unintelligibe to the other characters. (Note: You don't necessarily need to know the language the character is speaking—be creative with it!) Describe a character's reaction to something without explaining what it is. See if your fellow prompt responders can guess what it is. Write a story or a scene about one character playing a prank on another. Writing Prompt: Write a story that involves confusion over homonyms (words that have the same spelling but different meanings) or homophones (words that sound the same but are spelled differently). For World Storytelling Day, share the best story you've ever heard or told by word of mouth, or have a fictional character recount their favorite story. You're making your way down a cobbled street when a stocky, red-bearded man beckons you into an alley. Consider your handwriting, or a character's handwriting.

Doing Literary Criticism Product Details Author: Tim GillespieISBN: 978-157110-842-5Year: 2010Media: 320 pp/paper + CDGrade Range: 7-12Item No: WEB-0842 One of the greatest challenges for English language arts teachers today is the call to engage students in more complex texts. Tim Gillespie, who has taught in public schools for almost four decades, has found the lenses of literary criticism a powerful tool for helping students tackle challenging literary texts. Tim breaks down the dense language of critical theory into clear, lively, and thorough explanations of many schools of critical thought -- reader response, biographical, historical, psychological, archetypal, genre based, moral, philosophical, feminist, political, formalist, and postmodern. Doing Literary Criticism gives each theory its own chapter with a brief, teacher-friendly overview and a history of the approach, along with an in-depth discussion of its benefits and limitations. Table of Contents

Classroom Resources Home › Classroom Resources Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive Venn Diagram This interactive tool allows students to create Venn diagrams that contain two or three overlapping circles, enabling them to organize their information logically. Grades 3 – 12 | Mobile App Word Mover Word Mover allows children and teens to create "found poetry" by choosing from word banks and existing famous works; additionally, users can add new words to create a piece of poetry by moving/manipulating the text. Grades 3 – 12 | Student Interactive Trading Card Creator This tool provides a fun and useful way to explore a variety of topics such as a character in a book, a person or place from history, or even a physical object. Go to Lesson Plans Grades 6 – 8 | Lesson Plan Making Memories: An End-of-Year Digital Scrapbook Students reflect on their school year, creating a digital scrapbook consisting of images and text to present to their school community. Grades 3 – 5 | Lesson Plan Grades 5 – 8 | Lesson Plan Daily Book Boosts

Welcome to EFL 24 7 A free community for all teachers and students. Teachers Join our community with thousands of colleagues from more than 100 countriesDownload hundreds of printable grammar exercises, news activities, themes, etc.Share EFL/ESL worksheets and other activities at all levelsCreate and share interactive web exercises Students Access hundreds of worksheets and other activities for students of English as a second or foreign language Learn how our site works New Members List of our latest memberef Recent Forum PostingsLatest posts in our forum Recently Shared FilesLatest shared files

All the best? Yours sincerely? The last word on email signoffs | Media My earlier salutations piece created a fair bit of chatter, so I thought it was high time for the sequel. I might even get stuck into attachments next. Make it a trilogy. Anyway, the reason so many people ruminate on the language of email is because none of us are quite sure we’re doing it properly. Ahrwa Mahdawi won’t approve but, when it comes to email signoffs, I’m a “Best” man. “Best” is also a bastardised version of the slightly more jovial “All the best”, which in turn is an ellipsis of “I wish you all the best of luck.” “All the best” was ruined for me during a stay in a Miami hostel. At least “Best” is better than “Yours” – short for “Yours sincerely” or “Yours faithfully”, those annoying twins that refuse to die. And so we get to the initialled signoff. So what signoffs do I agree with? Another option is to go with nothing. So, what’s my final word on email’s final words? Cheers. Joseph Richardson is a copywriter at Barnaby Benson Copywriting.

Invitation to World Literature 0. Overview 1. The Epic of Gilgamesh The first known human story is that of Gilgamesh, king of Uruk. Images of artifacts from ancient Iraq mix with beautiful illustrations, dance, and costume to tell of the relations between gods and mortals, the search for friendship, love, and immortality. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Idioms Game Can you match all the idioms with their correct meanings? © 2012 This website is produced by the Student Recruitment, Admissions and International Development Division at The University of Manchester

ESL Writing Worksheets, Lessons, Sample Essays, Error Correction, and Printable Ebooks ESL Writing Exercise - Topic Sentences (Introduction) - Introduction to topic sentences and their function in a formal paragraph ESL Writing Exercise - Introduction to Similes and Metaphors - Using similes and metaphors to write interesting topic sentences ESL Writing Exercise - Similes and Metaphors Review - Practice describing people and things using similes and metaphors ESL Writing Exercise - Topic Sentences (Review) - Practice writing topic sentences ESL Writing Exercise - The Body of a Paragraph (Introduction) - Introduction to the body of a paragraph and the information that should be contained therein ESL Writing Exercise - The Body of a Paragraph (Review) - Practice thinking of information to use in the body of a paragraph ESL Writing Exercise - Concluding Sentences (Introduction) - Introduction to concluding sentences and their function in a paragraph ESL Writing Exercise - Concluding Sentences (Review) - Practice writing concluding sentences Punctuation and Conjunctions

100 Word Challenge - Creative writing for young people100 Word Challenge | Creative writing for young people Doing Literary Criticism Product Details Author: Tim GillespieISBN: 978-157110-842-5Year: 2010Media: 320 pp/paper + CDGrade Range: 7-12Item No: WEB-0842 One of the greatest challenges for English language arts teachers today is the call to engage students in more complex texts. Tim breaks down the dense language of critical theory into clear, lively, and thorough explanations of many schools of critical thought -- reader response, biographical, historical, psychological, archetypal, genre based, moral, philosophical, feminist, political, formalist, and postmodern. Doing Literary Criticism gives each theory its own chapter with a brief, teacher-friendly overview and a history of the approach, along with an in-depth discussion of its benefits and limitations. The accompanying CD offers abbreviated overviews of each theory (designed to be used as classroom handouts), examples of student work, collections of quotes to stimulate discussion and writing, an extended history of women writers, and much more.

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