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Kids and Socializing Online

Kids and Socializing Online
Social networking sites, chat rooms, virtual worlds, and blogs are how teens and tweens socialize online; it's important to help your child learn how to navigate these spaces safely. Among the pitfalls that come with online socializing are sharing too much information or posting comments, photos, or videos that can damage a reputation or hurt someone's feelings. Applying real-world judgment can help minimize those risks. Remind Kids that Online Actions Have Consequences The words kids write and the images they post have consequences offline. Some of your child's profile may be seen by a broader audience than you — or they — are comfortable with, even if privacy settings are high. Even if you delete the information from a site, you have little control over older versions that may exist on other people's computers and may circulate online. Tell Kids to Limit What They Share Tell your kids why it's important to keep some things — about themselves, family members, and friends — to themselves.

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Related:  Internet Safety

Lesson Ideas These lesson plans were perhaps the most popular activity for last year's Digital Learning Day. The links provide a ready-made activity that you can use with your students on Digital Learning Day and beyond. You will see that each lesson includes a full lesson plan and a short video introduction from the Digital Learning Day teacher who submitted the lesson. If you plan to use a lesson on Digital Learning Day in your classroom or school, make sure to add this activity to our map. EX Lesson Plan: Dinosaur Fossils The teacher will activate prior knowledge by asking the students to share what they know about fossils. Teacher records responses on a KWL chart. Introduce vocabulary words that will be used in the lesson. Teacher records the words dinosaur, fossil, paleontologist, and extinction on index cards. Discuss the vocabulary words with the students.

Online Privacy: Using the Internet Safely Copyright © 1995 - 2014Privacy Rights Clearinghouse Introduction Introduction Internet safety Information security[edit] Sensitive information such as personal information and identity, passwords are often associated with personal property (for example, bank accounts) and privacy and may present security concerns if leaked. Unauthorized access and usage of private information may result in consequence such as identity theft, as well as theft of property. Common causes of information security breaches include: Phishing[edit] Kids and Mobile Phones What age is appropriate for a kid to have a mobile phone? That's something for you and your family to decide. Consider your child’s age, personality, and maturity, and your family's circumstances.

Archdiocesan Schools Celebrating 172 Years of Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee! Catholic schools offer a unique blend of faith and education. At any of the 110 Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, children are prepared for future success, and are shaped to lead a Christ-centered life. Broadband - OnGuard Online You can get high-speed internet access through a variety of services, including: digital subscriber line (DSL) cable fiber optic satellite wireless Internet Safety Listen The Internet can be a wonderful resource for kids. They can use it to research school reports, communicate with teachers and other kids, and play interactive games.

netsmartz Click on the titles below to print age-appropriate activity cards. These activity cards are related to the online activities and easy to implement with few extra materials. Printable handouts are included. Parents may want to skim through the activities to get ideas for discussing Internet safety with their children. Primary (Ages 5-7) Bad Netiquette Stinks Students will learn the definition of netiquette and discuss the importance of having good manners online. A Pocket Guide to Social Media and Kids Pete Blackshaw, Executive Vice President, Digital Strategic Services, The Nielsen Company SUMMARY: When is a phone not a phone? In the hands of children and tweens, today’s cell phones are primarily used as text messaging devices, cameras, gaming consoles, video viewers, MP3 players, and incidentally, as mobile phones via the speaker capability so their friends can chime in on the call. Parents are getting dialed in to the social media phenomenon and beginning to understand—and limit—how children use new media.This article draws from a keynote speech delivered last month at the Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU) annual conference. Digital media is an enabling framework for brands, parents and educators—it’s on demand, interactive, sensing and connected.

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