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Software Defined Networking course GA Tech

Software Defined Networking course GA Tech
About the Course This course introduces software defined networking, an emerging paradigm in computer networking that allows a logically centralized software program to control the behavior of an entire network. Separating a network's control logic from the underlying physical routers and switches that forward traffic allows network operators to write high-level control programs that specify the behavior of an entire network, in contrast to conventional networks, whereby network operators must codify functionality in terms of low-level device configuration. Logically centralized network control makes it possible for operators to specify more complex tasks that involve integrating many disjoint network functions (e.g., security, resource control, prioritization) into a single control framework, allowing network operators to create more sophisticated policies, and making network configurations easier to configure, manage, troubleshoot, and debug. Course Syllabus Module 3: Control Plane Prof. Related:  SDN

What is software-defined networking (SDN)? - Definition from WhatIs.com Software-defined networking (SDN) is an umbrella term encompassing several kinds of network technology aimed at making the network as agile and flexible as the virtualized server and storage infrastructure of the modern data center. The goal of SDN is to allow network engineers and administrators to respond quickly to changing business requirements. In a software-defined network, a network administrator can shape traffic from a centralized control console without having to touch individual switches, and can deliver services to wherever they are needed in the network, without regard to what specific devices a server or other hardware components are connected to. The key technologies for SDN implementation are functional separation, network virtualization and automation through programmability. By submitting your personal information, you agree that TechTarget and its partners may contact you regarding relevant content, products and special offers.

Introduction to Sociology About the Course We live in a world that is changing very quickly. Sociology gives us the tools to understand our own lives and those quite remote from us. The premise of this class is that in order to benefit from the sociological perspective, we need to learn how to ask certain basic questions. We need to know how to seek answers through methods that strive to be systematic and generalizable.We will begin with some of the essential questions: How are the things that we take to be natural socially constructed? We will strive to understand how interaction in micro-level contexts affects larger social processes and how such macro-level processes influence our day to day lives. Course Syllabus Week 1: The Sociological Imagination Week 2: Three Sociological Questions Week 3: Methods of Sociological Research Week 4: Us and Them Week 5: Isolation, Groups, and Networks Week 6: Cities Week 7: Social Interaction and Everyday Life Recommended Background None; all are welcome. Suggested Readings

SDN notes Critical Thinking in Global Challenges About the Course Critical thinking is the ability to gather and assess information and evidence in a balanced and reflective way to reach conclusions that are justified by reasoned argument based on the available evidence. Critical thinking is a key skill in the information age, valuable in all disciplines and professions. This introductory course will give you the opportunity to better understand what critical thinking is, and to practice and enhance your critical thinking skills. The relevant background information for each global challenge will be provided to ensure that you can complete the exercises. Subtitles for all video lectures available: Portuguese (provided by the Lemann Foundation), English Course Format The course contains lectures, quizzes and exercises. This is a basic, informal and very pragmatic course, which focuses on getting you to think rationally and critically about evidence, and does not attempt to teach you about logic, reasoning and knowledge in a formal way.

University of Luxembourg - Daylight Project One of the great things about open source projects is that they provide a solid, easily available, and generally well documented basis for university research. This generally gives researchers the ability to concentrate just on the algorithms and instrumentation which they are interested in, without having to completely develop a software suite for the subject area they are studying. In the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) at the University of Luxembourg, researchers are using OpenDaylight as basis for addressing specific aspects in the context of the ongoing Cognitive Software Defined Networks (CoSDN) project. CoSDN seeks to combine the efficiency of SDN with cognitive learning algorithms and enhanced protocols to automatise SDN systems. Attack Detection (through learning): Having Defense4All as starting point, Dr. Contact details

Data Analysis About the Course You have probably heard that this is the era of “Big Data”. Stories about companies or scientists using data to recommend movies, discover who is pregnant based on credit card receipts, or confirm the existence of the Higgs Boson regularly appear in Forbes, the Economist, the Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times. But how does one turn data into this type of insight? This course is an applied statistics course focusing on data analysis. Recommended Background Some familiarity with the R statistical programming language ( and proficiency in writing in English will be useful. Course Format The course will consist of lecture videos broken into 8-10 minute segments.

SDN Test Suite – Methodology | SDN Hub SDN Test Suite – Methodology Typical SDN-based Network Virtualization The architecture rolled out can be one of the following: Pure-overlay: Programmable virtual dataplane elements (vDP) are inserted into edge servers and controlled by the controller cluster. They form overlay networks using tunnels that are routed over the legacy network fabric. Pure-underlay: SDN-enabled top-of-rack or leaf physical switches are deployed and controlled by the controller cluster. Testing these solutions irrespective of the architectural choice makes it essential to adopt a black-box testing methodology that integrates leverages components from the computing world and the networking world. Classes of Tests For testing Network Virtualization, we divided our tests into four main categories: Functionality tests: Essentially these test the claimed (and unclaimed) features of the network-virtualization solution, including the following. Setup for functionality and data plane tests using bare-metal servers

Malicious Software and its Underground Economy: Two Sides to Every Story Cybercrime has become both more widespread and harder to battle. Researchers and anecdotal experience show that the cybercrime scene is becoming increasingly organized and consolidated, with strong links also to traditional criminal networks. Modern attacks are indeed stealthy and often profit oriented. Malicious software (malware) is the traditional way in which cybercriminals infect user and enterprise hosts to gain access to their private, financial, and intellectual property data. By mixing a practical, hands-on approach with the theory and techniques behind the scene, the course discusses the current academic and underground research in the field, trying to answer the foremost question about malware and underground economy, namely, "Should we care?". Students will learn how traditional and mobile malware work, how they are analyzed and detected, peering through the underground ecosystem that drives this profitable but illegal business.

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