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Pronunciation

Pronunciation
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BBC Learning English | Pronunciation Tips Pronunciation Activities Minimal Pairs Click here to see a selection of ideas to practise minimal pairs (words which differ in only one sound, such as "cat" and "cut"). There is also a minimal pairs list here if you want some ideas to use with the activities. Sss, zzz and shhh Click here for an activity to practise the sounds sss, zzz and shhh which can be a problem for most nationalities. Homophones Click here for a worksheet to practise identifying and distinguishing between the spellings of 16 common homophones Short Vowels (a, e, i, o and u) handout. A short lesson plan to practise short vowel sounds. Long Vowels (a, e, i, o and u) handout. A short lesson plan to practise long vowel sounds (magic 'e'). Er, or and ah (/ɜ:/ /ɔ:/ and /ɑ:/) activities. Activities to introduce "er", "or" and "ah" sounds, with spelling hints and lots of follow-on practice. Pronunciation of words with "CH" Some ideas for lessons to practise the /tʃ/, /ʃ/ and /k/ pronunciation of the letters 'ch'. Ear and Air - pronunciation of /ɪə/ and /eə/

Prononciation: Alphabet en anglais I) LE COURSL'alphabet n'est pas très difficile à prononcer en anglais.Le tableau ci-dessous présente toutes les lettres de l'alphabet, classées en fonction de leur son. Ainsi, si on sait prononcer 'I', on sait aussi prononcer 'Y', qui comporte le même son (diphtongué). La présentation particulière permet de retrouver facilement une lettre. Toutes les lettres sont lues, dans l'ordre de la ligne. Ainsi, pour , vous allez entendre A, H, J, K dans l'ordre.Si votre équipement ne vous le permet pas, vous aurez les mêmes sons dans la vidéo en bas du cours. Notes : il s'agit ici des prononciations anglaises. Les deux lettres les plus compliquées à prononcer sont sans aucun doute pour les francophones les lettres : G et J, qui se prononcent à l'inverse du français :le G : et le J Entraînez-vous à bien prononcer ces lettres, puis passez à l'exercice... II) LA VIDEO D'APPLICATION1ère étape: Greg et Lillian récitent l'alphabet américain - essayez de retenir et de répéter la prononciation.

IPA Palette IPA Palette v2.2 Mavericks Prerelease IPA Input Method for Mac OS X 10.5 and later Licensed under the GPL Download IPA Palette 2.2 (3.2M). Finally! For Mac OS X 10.2-10.4:Download the previous IPA Palette 2.0 (1.3M).Download the previous IPA Palette 1.0 (616K). Bugs Fixed in 2.2 No longer use an installer; for Mavericks compatibility we now have an app called IPA Manager that will install IPA Palette for you. New Features in 2.2 You can click in an unoccupied part of an image map (a part that has no IPA symbol and thus doesn't hilite under your mouse) and drag it out into a new mini-palette (I call them "auxiliaries"). Bugs and Potential Problems IPA Manager is not fully localized in this prerelease version.The PDF icon used in Snow Leopard and later doesn't hilite (invert to white on black) correctly in the International menu, although it does in the Pref Pane. What Folks Are Saying IPA Palette does exactly what a linguist would want, exactly the way a linguist would want it.

Introducing Pronunciation in a Continuous Enrolment Class | TEFL Jobs UK By Yolande Deane DELTA qualified EFL teacher with 5 years’ teaching experience If you are a teacher who is concerned about improving your students’ pronunciation, you may decide to do a series of lessons where you introduce the phonemic script over a few classes. However, when you teach in a school that has continuous enrolment, focusing on a particular teaching point over a period of time can be difficult, especially if students only stay for two weeks or so. Students are also often working in cafés, bars, and pubs and do irregular shifts, which in turn affects their attendance. An easy way for teachers to deal with this lack of continuity and raise students’ awareness of the phonemic script (without burdening them with the ‘weird symbols’), is to take advantage of the spare minutes in a lesson that may arise -after a natural lull in a classroom discussion or task- and use the new lexis learnt in the lesson as an entrée into the script. Useful Links Phonemic Chart You might also like:

12 songs to practice the pronunciation of -ED endings - Luiz Otávio Barros As you know, the “-ed” endings of regular past tense verbs can be pronounced in three different ways: /t/, /d/ and /ɪd/, which is the one most students tend to overuse. Click here for an overview of the rules. Over the years, I have found that /t/ and /d/ are easier to notice and to produce if the verb comes immediately before a word beginning with a vowel sound: liked it – /laɪktɪt/dreamed of – /driːmdəv/ To help students get their tongues around the two sounds, I usually ask them to move /t/ and /d/ to the front of the vowel sound. This makes it obvious that there’s no room for /ɪ/: liked it – /laɪk tɪt/dreamed of – /driːm dəv/ Out of all the ideas and techniques I’ve used in class, this has probably been the most effective. So I decided to put together a 7-minute video containing 12 song excerpts you can use to help your students notice how /t/ and /d/ are linked to the vowel sounds that follow. By the way, if the video is out of synch, go back to the beginning and / or refresh the page.

Sounds: The Pronunciation App You can look up and listen to words and phrases in the WORDLIST, plus record and compare your own pronunciation. If you’re using a Macmillan coursebook, you can now buy additional wordlists directly inside the app. PRACTISE your pronunciation reading, writing and listening skillsTest yourself with one of the pronunciation QUIZZESLEARN with lesson plans, videos and top tips for teachers, and study hints for students ► Interactive Phonemic Chart (British and American English) with high quality audio - tap to hear a sound, or tap and hold to hear the sound and an example word.► Work in British or American English, and switch between them at any time.► Vocabulary Wordlist (with over 650 words):- Phonemic transcriptions and audio- Record your own pronunciation- Purchase new wordlists from directly inside the app. - Bug fixes for error when updating app. The ultimate interactive English pronunciation tool, for both students AND teachers.

5 books that will help you teach English pronunciation I don’t know about you, but I’m always on the lookout for new ideas on how to improve the pronunciation of my students; even the good ones need all the help they can get. This has always been an area of teaching that worries me and one where I still feel I can grow greatly as a teacher. Basically, I need the help of those seasoned pros out there who have blessed us with their knowledge in the form of written texts. With this in mind these are the books that I feel deserve a place among your collections. 1. by Peter Roach This little beauty is perfect for anyone who has ever wished they had a simple, straightforward resource for either personal reference or for their students to use. This text is an essential for the novice teacher and experienced pro alike, as it explains all the terminology and theory in a way that is easy to understand; a truly great book with which to get indoctrinated! 2. by Robin Walker 3. by Paul Tench 4. by Mark Hancock 5. by Susan Cameron

Explore | English Language Training Solutions How Does It Work? The Color Vowel™ Chart represents the vowel sounds of North American English. Each color in the Color Vowel™ Chart represents a single vowel sound. Each sound has a color name (such as GREEN) and a key word (such as TEA). The corresponding vowel sound is featured in both words. Explore Our Interactive Chart While the Color Vowel™ Chart appears simply to depict individual vowel sounds, it does much more than that. Here, it is important to focus on a fundamental rule of spoken English: each word has exactly one primary stressed syllable, and at the nucleus of that syllable is a vowel sound. One-syllable words contain one vowel sound (even if a word contains more than one vowel letter). The Color Vowel™ Chart provides teachers and learners with an accessible shorthand for talking about spoken English. Here’s an example taken from the classroom: Student: How do you say this word? Student: [who has already been introduced to the Color Vowel Chart] Um,… white.

Improving pronunciation: helping students get ‘more value’ from their English Jenny Dance, who runs a language school in Bristol, tells us why pronunciation training is so important for her students and what led her to find a system that would allow them to practice more effectively. This blog post previews her talk at IATEFL this year, ‘Getting more value from your students’ English by improving pronunciation’. Many students work hard to learn English vocabulary, and to develop accuracy in their usage and grammar – but when it comes to using the language orally, in real-life situations, they find a lack of understanding of pronunciation has a big impact on their capacity to communicate. ‘Sound-scapes’ and making pronunciation visual Making pronunciation visual – as well as aural – can make a huge difference in students ‘getting it’, and being motivated to improve. Stress placement Understanding the stress placement in a word is another simple way to improve clarity in speaking. Activity 1: ‘Where’s the stress?’ Activity 2: ‘Student to student challenge’ References

Developing pronunciation through songs Songs provide examples of authentic, memorable and rhythmic language. They can be motivating for students keen to repeatedly listen to and imitate their musical heroes. Here, we look at some aspects of pronunciation that can be focused on through songs. Using songs to focus on sounds Using songs to focus on words Using songs to focus on connected speech Conclusion Using songs to focus on sounds Sounds are the smallest unit from which words are formed and can be categorised as vowels and consonants. Why are they difficult? As languages differ in their range of sounds, students have to learn to 'physically' produce certain sounds previously unknown to them. However, incorrectly pronounced sounds strain communication, sometimes even changing a phrase's meaning. How songs can help Songs are authentic and easily accessible examples of spoken English. What we do To focus learners on particular sounds, we create activities based on songs' rhymes. Why is it difficult? Balbina Ebong & Marta J.

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