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Pronunciation

Pronunciation

http://esol.britishcouncil.org/pronunciation

Related:  Speaking, pronunciationPronunciation

5 classic ice breakers you can use with all learners Making learners comfortable on the first day of class, after a holiday, or even when coming together for the first time in a few days, can be beneficial in establishing, fostering and rekindling a positive learning environment. By taking time to do a few icebreakers, we can help learners become more comfortable with one another, and consequently more willing to participate in class. Icebreakers should never be seen as a waste of time: integrating icebreakers is a fantastic way to get ideas flowing… and never forget that! Here, then, are five old favorites that work in any situation and never fail to get your classes energized. 1.

Pronunciation Activities Minimal Pairs Click here to see a selection of ideas to practise minimal pairs (words which differ in only one sound, such as "cat" and "cut"). There is also a minimal pairs list here if you want some ideas to use with the activities. The holiday maze There isn't one 'correct' answer - different groups find themselves going on different holidays - so you can use the activity several times with the same class. It is an excellent, fun way to practise the 'functional' language of agreement and disagreement, suggestion and negotiation, as well as specific language relating to holidays, in a genuinely 'communicative' activity. It can be used with any level from pre-intermediate to upper-intermediate and beyond. Maze activity 62k pdf

Introducing Pronunciation in a Continuous Enrolment Class By Yolande Deane DELTA qualified EFL teacher with 5 years’ teaching experience If you are a teacher who is concerned about improving your students’ pronunciation, you may decide to do a series of lessons where you introduce the phonemic script over a few classes. However, when you teach in a school that has continuous enrolment, focusing on a particular teaching point over a period of time can be difficult, especially if students only stay for two weeks or so. Students are also often working in cafés, bars, and pubs and do irregular shifts, which in turn affects their attendance. An easy way for teachers to deal with this lack of continuity and raise students’ awareness of the phonemic script (without burdening them with the ‘weird symbols’), is to take advantage of the spare minutes in a lesson that may arise -after a natural lull in a classroom discussion or task- and use the new lexis learnt in the lesson as an entrée into the script.

Speaking aids Probably you agree that these little things make a lot of difference and it is with good reason why people spend time, money and energy to get the right small objects to help them put themselves and their loved ones into the right mood. Why use speaking aids Post-it notes Walls Coloured paper Small objects To control turn-taking As metaphors Conclusion Why use speaking aids In contrast, we often expect that our students have the right mood to speak without having anything that would help them to be in the right mood to speak, or any prompt that would help the flow of ideas. These small prompts or small speaking aids get especially important when children get into the age when they want to speak about themselves more than e.g. about the little animals or fairies in a tale.

5 books that will help you teach English pronunciation I don’t know about you, but I’m always on the lookout for new ideas on how to improve the pronunciation of my students; even the good ones need all the help they can get. This has always been an area of teaching that worries me and one where I still feel I can grow greatly as a teacher. Basically, I need the help of those seasoned pros out there who have blessed us with their knowledge in the form of written texts. With this in mind these are the books that I feel deserve a place among your collections. 1. Motivating speaking activities for lower levels Planning time has been shown to increase production in speaking tasks. Lower level learners often find it especially difficult to speak spontaneously, so these activities incorporate ‘thinking time’ during which learners can prepare for speaking by planning what they are going to say, and asking the teacher or using a dictionary to look up missing vocabulary. The following activities are relatively short, with minimal materials preparation time for the teacher.

Improving pronunciation: helping students get ‘more value’ from their English Jenny Dance, who runs a language school in Bristol, tells us why pronunciation training is so important for her students and what led her to find a system that would allow them to practice more effectively. This blog post previews her talk at IATEFL this year, ‘Getting more value from your students’ English by improving pronunciation’. Many students work hard to learn English vocabulary, and to develop accuracy in their usage and grammar – but when it comes to using the language orally, in real-life situations, they find a lack of understanding of pronunciation has a big impact on their capacity to communicate. Oral presentation Melissa: Hi, everyone! Today I would like to talk about how to become the most popular teen in school. Firstly, I think getting good academic results is the first factor to make you become popular since, having a good academic result, your teacher will award you in front of your schoolmates.

Developing pronunciation through songs Songs provide examples of authentic, memorable and rhythmic language. They can be motivating for students keen to repeatedly listen to and imitate their musical heroes. Here, we look at some aspects of pronunciation that can be focused on through songs. Using songs to focus on sounds Using songs to focus on words Using songs to focus on connected speech Conclusion Student presentations Why I get students to do presentations Syllabus fit Planning a presentation lesson Aims Classroom Management Assessment Conclusion Why I get students to do presentationsPresentations are a great way to have students practise all language systems areas (vocabulary, grammar, discourse and phonology) and skills (speaking, reading, writing and listening). They also build confidence, and presenting is a skill that most people will need in the world of work. I find that students who are good presenters are better communicators all round, since they are able to structure and express their ideas clearly. Presentation skills are extremely useful both in and outside the classroom. After completing a project, a presentation is a channel for students to share with others what they have learned.

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