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The Science of Procrastination and How to Manage It, Animated

The Science of Procrastination and How to Manage It, Animated
by Maria Popova This is where you insert the meta-joke about what else you’re actually supposed to be doing this very moment. From AsapSCIENCE — who have previously brought us the scientific cure for hangovers, the neurobiology of orgasms, and how music enchants the brain — comes this illustrated explication of the science of procrastination and how to manage it, a fine addition to these five perspectives on procrastination. Among the proposed solutions is the Pomodoro technique, a time-management method similar to timeboxing that uses timed intervals of work and reward. Human motivation is highly influenced by how imminent the reward is perceived to be — meaning, the further away the reward is, the more you discount its value. This is often referred to as Present bias, or Hyperbolic discounting. For a more metaphysical take on the subject, see the fantastic anthology The Thief of Time: Philosophical Essays on Procrastination. Donating = Loving Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/09/21/the-science-of-procrastination/

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The Physics Of Productivity: Newton’s Laws Of Getting Stuff Done In 1687, Sir Isaac Newton published his groundbreaking book, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, which described his three laws of motion. In the process, Newton laid the foundation for classical mechanics and redefined the way the world looked at physics and science. What most people don’t know, however, is that Newton’s three laws of motion can be used as an interesting analogy for increasing your productivity, simplifying your work, and improving your life. Allow me to present this analogy as Newton’s Laws of Productivity. Newton’s First Law of Productivity

How to Apologize for Standing Someone Up: A Lesson from Lewis Carroll’s Hilarious Letter by Maria Popova “I am obliged to use an umbrella to keep the tears from running down on to the paper.” From Richard Feynman’s sketches to Marilyn Monroe’s poetry to Sylvia Plath’s drawings , we’ve learned that famous creators often harbor little-known talent in a different medium . Among this tendency’s prime examples is Charles Dodgson, better-known today as Lewis Carroll . Though primarily celebrated as the author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland , he was also a masterful mathematician and logician, as well as a dedicated practitioner of the then-new art form of photography.

The Genius of Dogs and a Dimensional Definition of Human Intelligence by Maria Popova “Genius means that someone can be gifted with one type of cognition while being average or below average in another.” For much of modern history, dogs have inspired a wealth of art and literature, profound philosophical meditations, scientific curiosity, deeply personal letters, photographic admiration, and even some cutting-edge data visualization. But what is it that makes dogs so special in and of themselves, and so dear to us? Despite the mind-numbing title, The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs Are Smarter than You Think (public library; UK) by Brian Hare, evolutionary anthropologist and founder of the Duke Canine Cognition Center, and Vanessa Woods offers a fascinating tour of radical research on canine cognition, from how the self-domestication of dogs gave them a new kind of social intelligence to what the minds of dogs reveal about our own.

How to Beat Procrastination This is Part 2. You won’t get Part 2 if you haven’t read Part 1 yet. Here’s Part 1. PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. 25 maps that explain the English language by Libby Nelson on March 3, 2015 English is the language of Shakespeare and the language of Chaucer. It's spoken in dozens of countries around the world, from the United States to a tiny island named Tristan da Cunha.

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done - 5 Expert Tips Some days the to-do list seems bottomless. Just looking at it is exhausting. We all want to know how to stop being lazy and get more done. I certainly want the answer. So I decided to call a friend who manages to do this — and more. What Makes People Compelling by Maria Popova The art of mastering the vital osmosis of two conflicting qualities. What makes a winning personality? How can some people walk into a room and instantly entrance everyone into a state of amicable submission? What makes someone like Carl Sagan at once so beloved and so respected? That’s precisely what communications strategists John Neffinger and Matthew Kohut, who met while working at Harvard, explore in Compelling People: The Hidden Qualities That Make Us Influential (public library) — a synthesis of six years’ worth of their research and experience of working with Nobel Prize winners, CEOs, media personalities, politicians, and NASA commanders.

How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes: Lessons in Mindfulness and Creativity from the Great Detective by Maria Popova “A man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose.” “The habit of mind which leads to a search for relationships between facts,” wrote James Webb Young in his famous 1939 5-step technique for creative problem-solving, “becomes of the highest importance in the production of ideas.” But just how does one acquire those vital cognitive customs? Why Procrastinators Procrastinate PDF: We made a fancy PDF of this post for printing and offline viewing. Buy it here. (Or see a preview.)

DIY Braided Bead Bracelet It’s been awhile since our last bracelet DIY. I don’t know about you, but our wrists have been begging for another colorful addition for months now. So after playing with some materials that were already on hand, we’ve created a tutorial for a braided bead bracelet, which is a not so distant cousin of the hex nut and wrap bracelet. Because honestly, you can never have too many . . . You’ll need: Cut the waxed linen cord into a 26″ and 19″ piece.

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