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Results : Plagiarism Spectrum

Results : Plagiarism Spectrum
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Tips for Teachers: Dealing with Plagiarism — The Learning Scientists 1) Teach students about plagiarism in the classroom, even if they should have "learned it" already. Repetition of information, especially spaced repetition (1), improves learning. Learning about plagiarism is no different. If you teach a class for more advanced students, it is important to remember that students may not have yet mastered the more nuanced issues of academic integrity. 2) Have students go through the Indiana University Plagiarism Training. The Indiana University training program is fantastic for advanced high school students through graduate students. After the tutorial, a certification test is available. Of course, this isn’t the only resource available to learn about plagiarism. 3) Show your students examples of plagiarism beyond just word-for-word plagiarism. As I mentioned earlier, copying an entire paragraph or even paper should be clearly recognized as plagiarism by most students who have had any sort of instruction about plagiarism.

On August 26 2020, the Project Gutenberg website underwent some major changes. These changes had been previewed since early 2020, and visitors to the old site were invited to try the new site, including giving input via a brief survey. The old site is no longer available. If you found yourself on this page unexpectedly, it is because an old page was redirected here. Please use the navigation menus at the top of the page to find what you were looking for. All of the functionality, and most of the content, from the old site is still here - but in a different location. Below, find a description of the motivation behind the changes. THANK YOU for your patience as we continue to update the website to fix remaining problems, and maintain all the functionality and content that visitors expect. Known issues and “TO DO” items Updates on fixed items Let us know if you are still having trouble with these: OPDS: Issues resolved Kindle: Issues resolved Bookshelf detailed listings: Issues resolved Goals

Search Engine Showdown The Users' Guide to Web Searching The Web Library Building a World Class Personal Library with Free Web Resources The Web Library: Building a World Class Personal Library with Free Web Resources Online companion to the book. Frequently updated: last update 8-24-2009copyright Nick Tomaiuolo 2009 Indicates a site that is not discussed in the book. News! about FREE resources Featured: Google Books Magazine Search. Listen to Nick's podcast on searching Google Scholar These web pages are companions to the book The Web Library. World's Virtual Library (80,000+ FREE eBooks, eTexts, On-Line Books, eDocuments) n Welcome! Over the last decade, a quiet revolution has been going on in the development of a large library of "digital" or "electronic" books. While there are still large gaps, a very substantial body of "Western" thought is available in the form of downloadable or on-line books. Here's some of what you will find: n Reference Books: More than 2000 Dictionaries, Encyclopedias, Thesauri, Glossaries, Bibliographies, Chronologies, Timelines, Literary Histories, Biographies, Writing & Style Guides & Student Study aids. nnn Literature & Languages: About 12,000 basic texts in English & American Literature, ranging from Chaucer & other medieval texts to modern, contemporary Fiction & Literature.

Is Google Making Us Stupid? The process of adapting to new intellectual technologies is reflected in the changing metaphors we use to explain ourselves to ourselves. When the mechanical clock arrived, people began thinking of their brains as operating “like clockwork.” Today, in the age of software, we have come to think of them as operating “like computers.” But the changes, neuroscience tells us, go much deeper than metaphor. Thanks to our brain’s plasticity, the adaptation occurs also at a biological level. The Internet promises to have particularly far-reaching effects on cognition. When the Net absorbs a medium, that medium is re-created in the Net’s image. The Net’s influence doesn’t end at the edges of a computer screen, either. Never has a communications system played so many roles in our lives—or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts—as the Internet does today.

Owl's Cabinet of Wonders Mirage Bookmark Beautiful Bookmark Exhibition, History of Bookmarks The Online Books Page Global Peace Index – Vision of Humanity The results this year show that the level of global peacefulness deteriorated, with the average country score falling by 0.34 per cent. This is the ninth deterioration in peacefulness in the last twelve years, with 81 countries improving, and 80 recording deteriorations over the past year. The 2020 GPI reveals a world in which the conflicts and crises that emerged in the past decade have begun to abate, only to be replaced with a new wave of tension and uncertainty as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Iceland remains the most peaceful country in the world, a position it has held since 2008. It is joined at the top of the index by New Zealand, Austria, Portugal, and Denmark. Afghanistan is the least peaceful country in the world for the second year in a row, followed by Syria, Iraq, South Sudan and Yemen. Only two of the nine regions in the world became more peaceful over the past year. The world is now considerably less peaceful than it was at the inception of the index.

The World Factbook People from nearly every country share information with CIA, and new individuals contact us daily. If you have information you think might interest CIA due to our foreign intelligence collection mission, there are many ways to reach us. If you know of an imminent threat to a location inside the U.S., immediately contact your local law enforcement or FBI Field Office. For threats outside the U.S., contact CIA or go to a U.S. Embassy or Consulate and ask for the information to be passed to a U.S. official. Please know, CIA does not engage in law enforcement. In addition to the options below, individuals contact CIA in a variety of creative ways. If you feel it is safe, consider providing these details with your submission: Your full name Biographic details, such as a photograph of yourself, and a copy of the biographic page of your passport How you got the information you want to share with CIA How to contact you, including your home address and phone number

The Handbook of Texas Online | Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) Houston is Texas’s biggest city and the fourth largest city in the country. Founded on the banks of Buffalo Bayou in 1836, Houston is a city focused on progress, and is always keeping an eye towards the future. But it also has a rich and important history, which has affected the state, the nation, and the world. Houston served as the first permanent capital of the Republic of Texas, hosted the state’s first presidential convention, and built Texas’s first freeway and the world’s first air-conditioned sports stadium. In 1969 “Houston” rang out as the first word spoken from the moon, a nod to its legacy as “Space City.” Currently the Handbook of Houston is curating new entries and seeking contributors to be involved in the project. Click here to learn more »

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