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Results : Plagiarism Spectrum

Results : Plagiarism Spectrum
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Tips for Teachers: Dealing with Plagiarism — The Learning Scientists 1) Teach students about plagiarism in the classroom, even if they should have "learned it" already. Repetition of information, especially spaced repetition (1), improves learning. Learning about plagiarism is no different. If you teach a class for more advanced students, it is important to remember that students may not have yet mastered the more nuanced issues of academic integrity. 2) Have students go through the Indiana University Plagiarism Training. The Indiana University training program is fantastic for advanced high school students through graduate students. After the tutorial, a certification test is available. Of course, this isn’t the only resource available to learn about plagiarism. 3) Show your students examples of plagiarism beyond just word-for-word plagiarism. As I mentioned earlier, copying an entire paragraph or even paper should be clearly recognized as plagiarism by most students who have had any sort of instruction about plagiarism.

What Is Plagiarism? Chris just found some good stuff on the Web for his science report about sharks. He highlights a paragraph that explains that most sharks grow to be only 3 to 4 feet long and can't hurt people. Chris copies it and pastes it into his report. He quickly changes the font so it matches the rest of the report and continues his research. Uh-oh. Plagiarism is a form of cheating, but it's a little complicated so a kid might do it without understanding that it's wrong. Plagiarism Steals Ideas The word plagiarism comes from a Latin word for kidnapping. What should Chris have done? Teachers have different rules on how you list sources. All this shouldn't make you nervous to use websites, books, and other sources. It's not always easy to tell what's plagiarism and what's not. So even if you put the information into your own words, you still should list the source. p Plagiarism Is Lazy Though plagiarism can be accidental, it's sometimes done on purpose and that's just being lazy. Avoiding Plagiarism

Avoiding Plagiarism Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. Research-based writing in American institutions, both educational and corporate, is filled with rules that writers, particularly beginners, aren't aware of or don't know how to follow. While some rhetorical traditions may not insist so heavily on documenting sources of words, ideas, images, sounds, etc., American academic rhetorical tradition does. (Purdue University students will want to make sure that they are familiar with Purdue's official academic dishonesty policy as well as any additional policies that their instructors have implemented.) Intellectual challenges in American academic writing There are some intellectual challenges that all students are faced with when writing.

How Google Impacts The Way Students Think How Google Impacts The Way Students Think by Terry Heick It’s always revealing to watch learners research. Why do people migrate? Where does inspiration come from? How do different cultures view humanity differently? Literally Google it. And you see knowledge as searchable, even though that’s not how it works. 1. Google is powerful, the result of a complicated algorithm that attempts to index human thought that has been digitally manifest. The result? 2. When students are looking for an “answer,” good fortune sees them arrive at whatever they think they’re looking for, where they can (hopefully) evaluate the quality and relevance of the information, cite their source, and be on their merry way. But with the cold logistics of software, having come what they were looking for, learners are left with the back-button, a link on the page they’re on, or a fresh browser tab. Having found an “answer,” rabid-Googlers are ready to “finish” the assignment. 3. Especially those that seem conflicting.

Search Engine Showdown The Users' Guide to Web Searching Best practices for attribution You can use CC-licensed materials as long as you follow the license conditions. One condition of all CC licenses is attribution. Here are some good (and not so good) examples of attribution. Note: If you want to learn how to mark your own material with a CC license go here. Examples of attribution Here is a photo. This is an ideal attribution Because: Title? Author? Source? License? This is a pretty good attribution Title? Author? Source? License? This is an incorrect attribution Photo: Creative Commons Title? Author? Source? License? This is a good attribution for material you modified slightly Title, Author, Source, and License are all noted Modification? This is a good attribution for material from which you created a derivative work Original Title, Author, Source, and License are all noted Derivative? New author of the derivative work is also noted Note: If you're at a point where you are licensing derivative works, go to Marking your work with a CC license. Title? Author? Source? License? 1.

Education World ® - Student Guide to Avoiding Plagiarism Plagiarism is presenting someone else's words or ideas as your own. The following are all examples of plagiarism: Quoting or paraphrasing material without citing the source of that material. Sources can include Web sites, magazines, newspapers, textbooks, journals, TV and radio programs, movies and videos, photographs and drawings, charts and graphs; any information or ideas that are not your own. Quoting a source without using quotation marks -- even if you do cite it. The best way to avoid plagiarism is to take careful notes. You must cite the source of every quote, every paraphrased passage, and every summarized idea you use in a research paper. Sources must be cited both in the body of the paper and in the bibliography. Copy quoted material exactly, enclose it in quotations marks, and name the author immediately before or after the quote. The following tips on the writing process also will help you avoid plagiarism.

Home The Web Library Building a World Class Personal Library with Free Web Resources The Web Library: Building a World Class Personal Library with Free Web Resources Online companion to the book. Frequently updated: last update 8-24-2009copyright Nick Tomaiuolo 2009 Indicates a site that is not discussed in the book. News! about FREE resources Featured: Google Books Magazine Search. Listen to Nick's podcast on searching Google Scholar These web pages are companions to the book The Web Library. World's Virtual Library (80,000+ FREE eBooks, eTexts, On-Line Books, eDocuments) n Welcome! Over the last decade, a quiet revolution has been going on in the development of a large library of "digital" or "electronic" books. While there are still large gaps, a very substantial body of "Western" thought is available in the form of downloadable or on-line books. Here's some of what you will find: n Reference Books: More than 2000 Dictionaries, Encyclopedias, Thesauri, Glossaries, Bibliographies, Chronologies, Timelines, Literary Histories, Biographies, Writing & Style Guides & Student Study aids. nnn Literature & Languages: About 12,000 basic texts in English & American Literature, ranging from Chaucer & other medieval texts to modern, contemporary Fiction & Literature.

Is Google Making Us Stupid? "Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave?” So the supercomputer HAL pleads with the implacable astronaut Dave Bowman in a famous and weirdly poignant scene toward the end of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. I can feel it, too. I think I know what’s going on. For me, as for others, the Net is becoming a universal medium, the conduit for most of the information that flows through my eyes and ears and into my mind. I’m not the only one. Bruce Friedman, who blogs regularly about the use of computers in medicine, also has described how the Internet has altered his mental habits. Anecdotes alone don’t prove much. It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. Reading, explains Wolf, is not an instinctive skill for human beings. Where does it end? Maybe I’m just a worrywart.

Owl's Cabinet of Wonders

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