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Mason Jar Herb Garden

Mason Jar Herb Garden
Related:  Jardinage

Grow Vegetables To make all of these Instructables, download this collection of How To’s as an ebook. Download » Grow Vegetables give you 16 great ideas for harvesting your own produce easily and affordably. Don't get stung by high prices at the grocery store for vegetables that have been trucked in from all over the world, grow you own and be in control of what you eat. Whether you have a spacious backyard, or live in a tiny apartment, we have projects to get you growing today. Instructables is the most popular project-sharing community on the Internet. Sarah James Editor, Food & LivingInstructables.com

Slideshow: Money Graffiti To be perfectly upfront, what we’re about to show you is not something we endorse. The legality of writing on U.S. currency isn’t clear-cut: according to Title 18 of the United States Code, Section 333 (18 U.S.C. §333), “whoever mutilates, cuts, defaces, disfigures, or perforates, or unites or cements together, or does any other thing to any bank bill… with intent to render such bank bill, draft, note, or other evidence of debt unfit to be reissued, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than six months, or both.” The key term here is “intent to render” that bill to be reissued, which implies that it has to be taken out of circulation, and the bills we have included in this slideshow may very well be still exchanging hands. That said, money graffiti is at the very least fun to look at. Mint.com the best FREE way to manage your money.

One Glassy Garden: Growing Herbs in Mason Jars | Kitchen Garden Forget the usual terracotta and (ugh!) plastic pots for container gardening. When you grow herbs in mason jars, you can have garden fresh ingredients on hand and also add some style to a sunny windowsill. Picture a row of mason jars filled with different herbs—basil, chives, parsley, cilantro, thyme, rosemary—dressing up your kitchen. Pretty, right? The clear glass allows you to see the herbs’ rich root structure growing through the soil. With the right conditions—ample light and proper drainage—most herbs are extremely easy to grow, and growing them in mason jars is no different. 1. 2. 3. Finally, add some labels so you won’t forget what you planted! You diy, recycling junkies could also use pasta jars, pickle jars or whatever other glass container you come across for this project. image: B_Zedan

VERTICAL HERB GARDENS - gardening, planting, nature, garden, sustainable lifestyle, do-it-yourself, creative environmental options, craft, organics, gardening, planting, flower pots, reusing, old and vintage, nature, environmental news, recycling tips, br comments on 04/22 at 01:35 AM Oh wow, I like this too. I'll have to research this...like how do they get the plants to stay in the box?! I also like the boxes themselves. I am hoping to build a similar one soon for a tabletop salad garden. on 04/22 at 12:56 PM Hey! I want to build one too! on 04/22 at 01:00 PM My question would be how to water it. on 04/22 at 01:02 PM Inside the house environment. on 04/29 at 12:33 PM Wow, that's pretty awesome (not really a word I use that often!). on 05/26 at 03:40 AM Idon't know if you can do vertical planting, but I am doing an art project in which I give out seeds of trees that survived the atomic bombing to the people of US and the world. on 05/28 at 01:14 PM Saw this article and it made me think of your post...

paint chip calendar A few weeks ago, I saw this paint chip calendar on my friend David’s blog Cheltenham Road and knew I had to make one! It combines two things that I love…stylishness and organization. And the fact that it utilizes paint chips? Even better. I mostly followed David’s tutorial with just a few modifications. Since I planned for this calendar to hang in my office, I chose paint chips that would coordinate with the room and with the pin board that hangs on the adjacent wall. Here’s my version. materials needed: poster frame, fabric, hot glue gun, 35 paint chips, paper trimmer, corner rounder, fabric glue, foam brush 1) Purchase a poster frame (mine came from Target…$9.99). 2) Remove the edges from the frame. 3) Cover the cardboard insert with fabric using hot glue to secure it on the back, pulling tightly to keep the fabric smooth. 4) Trim the paint chips with a paper trimmer (I chose to leave the paint color names but cut off the brand). These BH&G paint chips came from Wal-Mart. Sharing here:

Créer une butte permanente au potager Après un stage de formation à la permaculture suivi à la Ferme de Bec Hellouin, je décide de me lancer dans la réalisation d’une butte permanente. Les avantages sont multiples : non labour, pas d’utilisation de produits phytosanitaires, cultures associées, aggradation constante du sol, meilleurs rendements, moins d’entretien, optimisation de la surface de culture… Je réalise cette butte en partie à l’emplacement d’un potager conventionnel et d’une zone engazonnée en prenant en compte les zones d’ombre du jardin. Les étapes de création de la butte : L’opération est simple mais demande quand même un peu d’énergie musculaire. 1. Je dessine la forme de la butte et des allées à l’aide de tuteurs de bambou. 2. Je sarcle le futur emplacement de la butte et des allées. 3. Opération simplifiée grâce à l’étape précédente. 4. Quelque que soit le type de culture que vous allez installer il est toujours plus facile de pailler avant de planter. 5. Premières impressions : Pour aller plus loin…

Gift Ideas for Poor Creative Souls (17) Posted by: Cathy on Aug 04, 2012 Tagged in: Untagged Paper Flower Tutorial Doesn't this look divine? When I first saw these, I thought they would be really difficult to do because they look quite intricate but actualy, they're easy! Anyone can make these with the minimal of materials. Materials needed: - hand-painted paper or colored paper - watercolor paint (if painting your own paper) - florists tape - cork - wire - decorator's tape - scissors - craft knife If you decide to paint your own paper, you can add a wash of soft pink to your paper/card. Cut your paper in thin strips with a craft knife. If you've used a few pieces of paper, join them with paper glue so that you end up with a long strip. Start rolling up this strip of paper. Now you can cut your green paper into leaf shapes as above. Attach your leaves with more tape all around the base of the flower. To make the center of your flower, cut a small piece of cork and push a piece of wire through it as in the image. Et voila!

Michael Moore - SW School of Botanical Medicine Home Page Started in 1994, this site was maintained by Michael Moore, and was last updated by him on July 22, 2008 When my typewriter broke 14 years ago, I grudgingly purchased my first computer at age 53...an ancient used Mac Plus, recommended for low-tech ageing neo-Luddite green hippies such as myself. 12 computers, 4 scanners, 8 powerbooks, 4 digital cameras, 3 LCD projectors and 3 mini DV cameras later, I STILL have two unused ribbons left over from that Smith-Corona. All OCR work is done with FineReader 5 Pro by ABBYY (the best! from crazed Russian software techies) If an ol' bear like me can pull this off, imagine what YOU could do for our collective benefit! Send comments, complaints, input and new site information to...hrbmoore@mindspring.com You are visitor number:

Related:  Gardening