background preloader

THE STONE - Opinionator

THE STONE - Opinionator
This is the second in a series of interviews about religion that I am conducting for The Stone. The interviewee for this installment is Louise Antony, a professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the editor of the essay collection “Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular Life.” Gary Gutting: You’ve taken a strong stand as an atheist, so you obviously don’t think there are any good reasons to believe in God. But I imagine there are philosophers whose rational abilities you respect who are theists. Louise Antony: I’m not sure what you mean by saying that I’ve taken a “strong stand as an atheist.” G.G.: That is what I mean. L.A.: O.K. I say ‘there is no God’ with the same confidence I say ‘there are no ghosts’ or ‘there is no magic.’ That’s not to say that I think everything is within the scope of human knowledge. G.G.: Yes, I do think it’s relevant to ask believers why they prefer their particular brand of theism to other brands.

Interviews Is there really an analytic tradition in philosophy?. Of course there is an analytic tradition in philosophy, but analytic philosophy is not a philosophical school. There is no set of philosophical doctrines that all, or even the great majority of analytic philosophers adhere to, and there is no restricted set of common goals or interests. There is also considerable overlap between continental philosophers like Brentano, Husserl, Gadamer, Levinas, and Habermas, on the one hand, and various collections of analytic philosophers on the other. But that doesn’t mean that the divide is merely sociological. Continuing the End Times series, Richard Marshall interviews Scott Soames.

Philosophy Pages Philosophy TV RTP - Home Page The Ragged Trousered Philosopher or 'RTP' as we are affectionately known to our friends, is an exercise in Web authorship which has been going on since 1996 (the core 'book' was started in 1986), the title of which was inspired by Robert Tressell's classic 'The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists'. But that's about as far as the resemblance goes. There is little doubt that life on Earth is headed in the general direction being painted here. Now, what is somewhat less certain is whether any remnants of the intelligent consciousness of our own species will survive 'coherently' into the future. Whether we are destined to be dust or deity will be determined by how well we learn to cope with the challenges of being intelligent. For the next several hundred years (at least), we will uncover ever more dangerous secrets of the universe. Our choices are: to die slowly - we could, with planet-wide agreement, probably eke out a few million years on this planet. Or can we think ahead? spam killer

Ockham’s Beard Perennial philosophy The Perennial philosophy (Latin: philosophia perennis), [note 1] also referred to as Perennialism, is a perspective in the philosophy of religion which views each of the world’s religious traditions as sharing a single, universal truth on which the foundation of all religious knowledge and doctrine has grown. Agostino Steuco (1497–1548) coined the term philosophia perennis,[1] drawing on the neo-Platonic philosophy of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499) and Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–94). In the early 19th century this idea was popularised by the Transcendentalists. Towards the end of the 19th century the Theosophical Society further popularized the concept under the name of "Wisdom-Religion" or "Ancient Wisdom".[2] In the 20th century it was popularized in the English-speaking world through Aldous Huxley's book The Perennial Philosophy as well as by the strands of thought which culminated in the New Age movement. Definition[edit] Origins[edit] Neo-Platonism[edit] Steuco[edit]

Philosophies and Philosophers philosophy bites YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES PRESENTS Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy abduction (Igor Douven) Abelard [Abailard], Peter (Peter King) Abhidharma (Noa Ronkin) abilities (John Maier) Abner of Burgos (Shalom Sadik) Abrabanel, Judah (Aaron Hughes) abstract objects (Gideon Rosen) accidental properties — see essential vs. accidental properties action (George Wilson and Samuel Shpall) action-based theories of perception (Robert Briscoe and Rick Grush) action at a distance — see quantum mechanics: action at a distance in actualism (Christopher Menzel) adaptationism (Steven Hecht Orzack and Patrick Forber) Addams, Jane (Maurice Hamington) Adorno, Theodor W. (Lambert Zuidervaart) advance directives (Agnieszka Jaworska) Aegidius Romanus — see Giles of Rome Aenesidemus — see skepticism: ancient aesthetic, concept of the (James Shelley) aesthetics aesthetics of the everyday (Yuriko Saito) affirmative action (Robert Fullinwider) Africana Philosophy (Lucius T. Outlaw Jr.) B [jump to top] C [jump to top] D [jump to top] Damian, Peter (Toivo J.

Nouvelle Droite Nouvelle Droite (English: New Right) is a school of political thought founded largely on the works of Alain de Benoist and GRECE (Research and Study Group on European Civilization). Etymology and history[edit] The term Nouvelle Droite was first mentioned in the French media in 1979, in a media campaign against GRECE and the Club de l'Horloge[citation needed]. Some authors have traced it to Le Figaro editor and GRECE member Louis Pauwels, who wrote in the France Soir of March 29, 1979: "My positions are those of what we can call the 'new right', and have nothing to do with the bourgeois, conservative, and reactionary right Some of the prominent names that have collaborated with GRECE include Arthur Koestler, Hans Eysenck, Konrad Lorenz, Mircea Eliade, Raymond Abellio. Ideology[edit] De Benoist has claimed that: Critics identify the Nouvelle Droite as a new or sanitized form of neo-fascism, or an ideology of the extreme right that significantly draws from fascism (Laqueur, 1996; Lee, 1997).

Rationally Speaking Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Related:  Philosophyblogs