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Dalai Lama tells his Facebook friends that religion "is no longer adequate"

Dalai Lama tells his Facebook friends that religion "is no longer adequate"
Well, he'd hardly be the first Buddhist to say something like this. From what I've read, there are already lots of Buddhists, and historical Buddhist movements in various countries, who are atheistic and who prefer to return to Buddhism's roots as a kind of self-help, personal psychological and philosophical system—and yes, I realize I'm hugely oversimplifying that ideological stripe of Buddhism—and that's fine. And if this helps the world be a better place, cool. I'm all for it. But as an atheist I had already got to this point without making sand paintings, spinning prayer wheels or staring at stupas or rock gardens to shut off all mental processes and get to Satori. Maybe I'm just doing it wrong. Related:  Buddhist PsychologyReligion

Zététique Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Pour la définition de la zététique comme partie des mathématiques, voir Algèbre nouvelle. La zététique est définie comme « l'art du doute » par Henri Broch[1]. La zététique se réclame aussi du scepticisme scientifique, et plus généralement de la démarche de doute cartésien qu'elle décrit comme nécessaire en science comme en philosophie. Origine du mot[modifier | modifier le code] « Zététique » vient de l’adjectif grec ζητητικός, zētētikós « qui aime chercher », « qui recherche », lequel est issu du verbe ζητῶ, « chercher ». Elle a pour objectif de contribuer à la formation, chez chaque individu, d'une capacité d'appropriation critique du savoir humain. La zététique recommande de penser avec ordre et méthode, en tenant à distance dogmes, préjugés et idées reçues. Principes[modifier | modifier le code] L'astrologie, la parapsychologie, les médecines non conventionnelles, les pseudo-sciences et autres phénomènes paranormaux ont pignon sur rue.

Buddhism Basic Beliefs and Teachings By Barbara O'Brien Updated December 29, 2015. Here is a basic introduction to Buddhism. What Is Buddhism? Buddhism is a religion based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, who lived about 25 centuries ago in what is now Nepal and northern India. In the remaining years of his life, the Buddha traveled and taught. In the centuries following the Buddha's life, Buddhism spread throughout Asia to become one of the dominant religions of the continent. The most common estimate is 350 million, which makes Buddhism the fourth largest of the world's religions. Read More: The Life of the BuddhaRead More: What's a Buddha? How Is Buddhism Distinctive From Other Religions? Buddhism is so different from other religions that some people question whether it is a religion at all. Read More: Buddhism: Philosophy or Religion? Most religions are defined by their beliefs. Instead of teaching doctrines to be memorized and believed, the Buddha taught how we can realize truth for ourselves. Basic Teachings

15 Books You Should Have Read in 2010 | Technology on GOOD Image by Jane Mount, Courtesy 20x200 Yes, we read Freedom this year and yes, it was good. As Esquire put it, it “was one great slab of a book, at a time when most books have given up on greatness.” But there were other books in 2010, books that had to compete for our ever more challenged attention spans and won. 1. Author: Stephen King Recommended by: Ben Jervey, Environment Editor Why read? 2. Author: George R.R. Recommended by: Morgan Clendaniel, Deputy Editor, GOOD Why read? 3. Author: Jan Gehl Recommended by: Alissa Walker, Contributing Editor, GOOD Why read? 4. Author: Tom Rachman Recommended by: Zach Frechette, Editor in Chief, GOOD Why read? 5. Author: Walter Van Tillburg Clark Recommended by: Cord Jefferson, Culture Editor, GOOD Why Read? 6. Author: Colum McCann Recommended by: Nicola Twilley, Food Editor, GOOD Why read? 7. Author: Diane Ravitch Recommended by: Liz Dwyer, Education Editor, GOOD Why read? 8. Author: Matthew B. Recommended by: Allan Chochinov, Editor in chief, Core77 Why read?

Historian Says Piece of Papyrus Refers to Jesus’ Wife The faded papyrus fragment is smaller than a business card, with eight lines on one side, in black ink legible under a magnifying glass. Just below the line about Jesus having a wife, the papyrus includes a second provocative clause that purportedly says, “she will be able to be my disciple.” The finding was made public in Rome on Tuesday at the International Congress of Coptic Studies by Karen L. King, a historian who has published several books about new Gospel discoveries and is the first woman to hold the nation’s oldest endowed chair, the Hollis professor of divinity. The provenance of the papyrus fragment is a mystery, and its owner has asked to remain anonymous. Even with many questions unsettled, the discovery could reignite the debate over whether Jesus was married, whether Mary Magdalene was his wife and whether he had a female disciple. Dr. She repeatedly cautioned that this fragment should not be taken as proof that Jesus, the historical person, was actually married. Dr.

Different Takes: Should we abandon idea of hell? Editor’s note: The new documentary "Hellbound?" explores Americans' ideas about hell. We asked two prominent Christians who featured in the film to give us their very different takes on hell. My Faith: The dangerous effects of believing in hell Editor’s note: Frank Schaeffer is a New York Times bestselling author. His latest book is "Crazy For God." By Frank Schaeffer, Special to CNN Is it any coincidence that the latest war of religion that started on September 11, 2001, is being fought primarily between the United States and the Islamic world? And nowhere on earth have conservative Christians been closer to controlling foreign policy than here in the United States. What a pair George W. Follow the CNN Belief Blog on Twitter And so my view of "hell" encompasses two things: First, the theological question about whether a land of eternal suffering exists as God's "great plan" for most of humanity. CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories Why does our view of hell matter?

Michael Shermer The religion of Buddhism Religions of the world Menu Quotation by Siddhãrtha Gautama (Buddha): "Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it. Sponsored link Background: Buddhism currently has about 376 million followers and is generally listed as the world's fourth largest religion after Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. Topics covered in this section: Sponsored link: Amazon.com's online store lists the following books on Buddhism: If you see a generic Amazon.com ad here, please click on your browser's refresh key. For an introduction to Buddhism, we recommend the following books. Thubten Chodron, "Buddhism for Beginners." Not a sponsored link Site navigation: Copyright © 1996 to 2011 by Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance Latest update: 2013-JUL-08 Author: B.A. Sponsored link

9 Mind-Bending Epiphanies That Turned My World Upside-Down Over the years I’ve learned dozens of little tricks and insights for making life more fulfilling. They’ve added up to a significant improvement in the ease and quality of my day-to-day life. But the major breakthroughs have come from a handful of insights that completely rocked my world and redefined reality forever. The world now seems to be a completely different one than the one I lived in about ten years ago, when I started looking into the mechanics of quality of life. It wasn’t the world (and its people) that changed really, it was how I thought of it. Maybe you’ve had some of the same insights. 1. The first time I heard somebody say that — in the opening chapter of The Power of Now — I didn’t like the sound of it one bit. I see quite clearly now that life is nothing but passing experiences, and my thoughts are just one more category of things I experience. If you can observe your thoughts just like you can observe other objects, who’s doing the observing? 2. Of course! 3. 4. 5.

Benefits of Circumcision Outweigh Risks, Pediatric Group Says But the academy stopped short of recommending routine circumcision for all baby boys, saying the decision remains a family matter. The academy had previously taken a neutral position on circumcision. The new policy statement, the first update of the academy’s circumcision policy in over a decade, appears in the Aug. 27 issue of the journal Pediatrics. The group’s guidelines greatly influence pediatric care and decisions about coverage by insurers; in the new statement, the academy also said that circumcision should be covered by insurance. The long-delayed policy update comes as sentiment against circumcision is gaining strength in the United States and parts of Europe. In Europe, a government ethics committee in Germany last week overruled a court decision that removing a child’s foreskin was “grievous bodily harm” and therefore illegal. “We’re not pushing everybody to circumcise their babies,” Dr. Significant complications are believed to occur in approximately one in 500 procedures.

The Dragon In My Garage by Carl Sagan "A fire-breathing dragon lives in my garage" Suppose (I'm following a group therapy approach by the psychologist Richard Franklin) I seriously make such an assertion to you. Surely you'd want to check it out, see for yourself. "Show me," you say. "Where's the dragon?" "Oh, she's right here," I reply, waving vaguely. You propose spreading flour on the floor of the garage to capture the dragon's footprints. "Good idea," I say, "but this dragon floats in the air." Then you'll use an infrared sensor to detect the invisible fire. "Good idea, but the invisible fire is also heatless." You'll spray-paint the dragon and make her visible. "Good idea, but she's an incorporeal dragon and the paint won't stick." Now, what's the difference between an invisible, incorporeal, floating dragon who spits heatless fire and no dragon at all? Imagine that things had gone otherwise. Now another scenario: Suppose it's not just me. » Read this in Belorussian! » to Atheists of Silicon Valley Homepage «

Home What is Theravada Buddhism? Theravada (pronounced — more or less — "terra-VAH-dah"), the "Doctrine of the Elders," is the school of Buddhism that draws its scriptural inspiration from the Tipitaka, or Pali canon, which scholars generally agree contains the earliest surviving record of the Buddha's teachings.[1] For many centuries, Theravada has been the predominant religion of continental Southeast Asia (Thailand, Myanmar/Burma, Cambodia, and Laos) and Sri Lanka. Today Theravada Buddhists number well over 100 million worldwide.[2] In recent decades Theravada has begun to take root in the West. Many Buddhisms, One Dhamma-vinaya The Buddha — the "Awakened One" — called the religion he founded Dhamma-vinaya — "the doctrine and discipline." Pali: The Language of Theravada Buddhism The language of the Theravada canonical texts is Pali (lit., "text"), which is based on a dialect of Middle Indo-Aryan that was probably spoken in central India during the Buddha's time.[7] Ven. A Brief Summary of the Buddha's Teachings

Western Philosophy Jay Michaelson: When Jesus Healed a Same-Sex Partner In this year's battles over same-sex marriage (there are referenda on the issue in Minnesota, Maine, Maryland, and Washington), opponents have tried to depict the issue as a choice between traditional religious values and some sinister homosexual agenda, between God and gay. In fact, a vote for same-sex marriage is a vote for traditional religious values, such as the importance of companionship (Genesis 2:18) or civil justice (Deuteronomy 16:20), and the value that "love" isn't whatever we say it is but that movement of the heart that is patient, kind, and humble (1 Corinthians 13:4-6). But, some people argue, what about the fact that the only sanctioned relationship in the Bible is between a man and a woman? Well, in fact, that's not quite the case. The story of the faithful centurion, told in Matthew 8:5-13 and Luke 7:1-10, is about a Roman centurion who comes to Jesus and begs that Jesus heal his pais, a word sometimes translated as "servant." But pais does not mean "servant."

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