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Creative Commons

Creative Commons
Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share.[1] The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons licenses free of charge to the public. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. An easy-to-understand one-page explanation of rights, with associated visual symbols, explains the specifics of each Creative Commons license. Creative Commons licenses do not replace copyright, but are based upon it. They replace individual negotiations for specific rights between copyright owner (licensor) and licensee, which are necessary under an "all rights reserved" copyright management, with a "some rights reserved" management employing standardized licenses for re-use cases where no commercial compensation is sought by the copyright owner. Dr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons

Related:  Les licences libresCreative Commons

Free software license A free software licence is a notice that grants the recipient of a piece of software extensive rights to modify and redistribute that software. These actions are usually prohibited by copyright law, but the rights-holder (usually the author) of a piece of software can remove these restrictions by accompanying the software with a software license which grants the recipient these rights. Software using such a licence is free software as conferred by the copyright holder. Some free software licenses include "copyleft" provisions which require all future versions to also be distributed with these freedoms. Other, "permissive", free software licenses are usually just a few lines containing the grant of rights and a disclaimer of warranty, thus also allowing distributors to add restrictions for further recipients. The most widely used free software license is the GNU General Public License.

Creative Commons license This video explains how Creative Commons licenses can be used in conjunction with commercial licensing arrangements. Creative Commons licenses are explained in many languages and used around the world, such as pictured here in Cambodia. A Creative Commons (CC) license is one of several public copyright licenses that enable the free distribution of an otherwise copyrighted work. A CC license is used when an author wants to give people the right to share, use and build upon a work that they have created. CC provides an author flexibility (for example, they might choose to allow only non-commercial uses of their own work) and protects the people who use or redistribute an author's work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions that are specified in the license by which the author distributes the work. There are several types of CC licenses.

Copyright "Copyrighting" and "Copyrights" redirect here. For the use of words to promote or advertise, see Copywriting. For the Wikipedia policy about copyright issues, see Wikipedia:Copyrights. Copyleft Copyleft symbol Copyleft (a play on the word copyright) is the practice of using copyright law to offer the right to distribute copies and modified versions of a work and requiring that the same rights be preserved in modified versions of the work. In other words, copyleft is a general method for marking a creative work as freely available to be modified, and requiring all modified and extended versions of the creative work to be free as well.[1] Copyleft is a form of and can be used to maintain copyright conditions for works such as computer software, documents, and art.

List of works available under a Creative Commons license From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of notable works available under a Creative Commons license. Works available under a Creative Commons license are becoming more common. Note that there are multiple Creative Commons licenses with important differences. Books[edit]

All rights reversed The copyleft symbol. Unlike the copyright symbol, it has no legal meaning. In 1984/5 programmer Don Hopkins sent Richard Stallman a letter labeled "Copyleft—all rights reversed". Radiohead Says: Pay What You Want Roughly 12,000 albums are released in an average year, so the announcement late Sunday night that the new Radiohead record, In Rainbows, will be out Oct. 10 is not itself big news. Sure, Radiohead is on a sustained run as the most interesting and innovative band in rock, but what makes In Rainbows important — easily the most important release in the recent history of the music business — are its record label and its retail price: there is none, and there is none. In Rainbows will be released as a digital download available only via the band's web site, Radiohead.com. There's no label or distribution partner to cut into the band's profits — but then there may not be any profits.

Frequently Asked Questions These FAQs are designed to provide a better understanding of Creative Commons, our licenses, and our other legal and technical tools. They provide basic information, sometimes about fairly complex topics, and will often link to more detailed information. Other CC FAQs: CC0 Public Domain Dedication and Public Domain Mark. Free Art License History[edit] The license was written in July 2000 with contributions from the mailing list <copyleft_attitude April.org> and in particular with Mélanie Clément-Fontaine and David Geraud, lawyers, and Isabelle Vodjdani and Antoine Moreau, artists. It followed meetings held by Copyleft Attitude Antoine Moreau with the artists gathered around the magazine Allotopie: Francis Deck, Antonio Gallego, Roberto Martinez and Emma Gall. They took place at "Accès Local" in January 2000 and "Public" in March 2000, two places of contemporary art in Paris.[2] In 2003, Moreau organized a session at the EOF space which brought together hundreds of authors to achieve exposure according to the principles of copyleft with this condition: "Free Admission if free work".[3] In 2005, he wrote a memoir edited by Liliane Terrier entitled Le copyleft appliqué à la création artistique.

GNU General Public License The GNU General Public License (GNU GPL or GPL) is the most widely used[5] free software license, which guarantees end users (individuals, organizations, companies) the freedoms to use, study, share (copy), and modify the software. Software that allows these rights is called free software and if the software is copyleft ensures those are retained. The GPL demands both. The license was originally written by Richard Stallman of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) for the GNU project.

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