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Making stickers out of recycled paper

Making stickers out of recycled paper
Making stickers out of recycled paper October 25th, 2011 I recently discovered this great tutorial by Amanda Wood on how to make lovely stickers from recycled paper. The best thing about it is that the tutorial uses one of my favourite things – envelopes with funky security patterns. How could I resist! You will need: For the glue: 6 tbsp white vinegar 4 packages of unflavoured gelatin 1 tbsp flavouring such as peppermint, lemon or vanilla extract For the stickers: foam paint brush security envelopes or other papers from the recycling bin (enough glue for about 20 envelopes) paper punch (I used a 2″ scalloped circle punch in the picture) sponge for moistening stickers First of all you need to make the glue, so bring the vinegar to boil in a small pan. If you don’t want to go to all the hassle of making glue, you could always use ‘lick n stick’ glue – it’s the stuff I use for my recycled envelopes and you can get it here.

http://www.milomade.co.uk/blog/2011/10/making-stickers-out-of-recycled-paper/

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