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Garlic butter roasted mushrooms

Garlic butter roasted mushrooms
A repeat offender in the lede-burier category, let me begin with what matters: this is absolutely my new favorite quick and obsessively delicious way to prepare mushrooms. And now, a story. Once upon a time, I was a vegetarian who loved going to steakhouses. A friends birthday would approach and out of kindness to me, they’d start talking about gathering friends at a restaurant that had vegetarian options and I’d beg them to go to a steakhouse instead. “It’s your birthday! I know you want a steak! If only I knew the secret: escargot! I found this recipe a while back on Gourmet.com, something that hadn’t made the cut of what had to have been their final issue (moment of silence, but do you know what’s almost as wonderful?). Garlic Butter Roasted Mushrooms Perfect as can be from Gourmet.com Preheat oven to 450°F with rack in middle.

*Simply Scratch*: Parmesan Garlic Bread: Last week was a busy week filled with a field trip to the zoo sandwiched by 3 twelve hour shifts. By Friday I was extremely happy for the weekend to arrive. Although Pat worked late, we still barbecued dinner and relaxed with a few adult beverages after tucking in our girls. Tonight he made a special request… for garlic bread. This garlic bread beats the store bought kind by a mile. It super easy to whip up and only takes a few minutes under the broiler. Here are the ingredients you will need. Start by pressing the three cloves of garlic into a medium bowl. Mince up a shallot so it measures one tablespoon. Add the shallot to the garlic in the medium bowl. Next, mince up the fresh parsley and measure out a tablespoon. Add that to the bowl along with the salt and pepper. Now add the *gasp* two sticks of butter and the two tablespoons {give or take} of freshly grated Parmesan cheese. Mix until combined. And set aside, just for now. Grab your loaf of Italian bread. Remove and slice immediately.

Kitchen Hack: One-Minute Bread Oven-fresh bread is one of life’s simple joys. Ciabatta, a crisp-crusted Italian bread with hints of sourdough and loads of crannies longing for butter, is one of the easiest breads to make at home. Why are we talking about baking bread on Lifehack? You may have heard of “no-knead” bread before. I wanted something very, very simple that delivered great results in 60 seconds of prep time or less. For your ciabatta you’ll need: 4 cups of all-purpose flour (do NOT pack the flour into the measuring cup)2 cups of warm water1 teaspoon of salt1/4 teaspoon of granulated yeast (or equivalent) For the gorgeous readers needing metric equivalents of this recipe, Toon left a comment with the following conversion: 500 grams of all-purpose flour4,7 deciliter of warm water4 grams of salt (= 1 teaspoon = 5 ml)1 gram of dry yeast (= 1/4 teaspoon = 1,25 ml) Have everything handy? 1. Pour the warm water into the medium-size mixing bowl and stir in the yeast with a spoon. 2. 3. Use a spoon. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Jamaican Banana Fritters - ThatsSoYummy.com - StumbleUpon There’s a thing in my house that when you have ripe ol bananas either you make banana bread or banana fritters. These delicious tasty treats can be eaten morning, noon, or night, as a snack or as dessert. These fritters are so easy to make and will satisfy any craving you may have. So if you have a few of these bananas lying around your hose… don’t toss them, put them to GREAT use! Enjoy! Peel and mash the ripe bananas. Beat egg, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Next, blend egg mixture with mashed bananas. Make sure it is all incorporated. Then sift flour and baking powder into the banana/egg mixture. Mix it all together. If the batter seems to be too thick add a little milk… I added about 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup of milk. Add oil to a frying pan and place on medium high heat. Drop spoonfuls of the banana fritter batter into the hot oiled frying pan. Flip when you see the edges starting to get brown and golden. Lastly, combine cinnamon and sugar together to create your cinnamon sugar. Ingredients

Homemade, Vegan Coffee Creamer One of the questions I’m most often asked by readers, friends, and strangers, is whether or not I still get cravings for non-vegan food, and if I do, what foods do I miss? The very honest truth is that I really don’t crave any non-vegan food anymore. I may have a fond, passing remembrance of Greek yogurt now and then, but it’s not really a “craving” of the sort that makes me tempted to go out and buy a container of Chobani–the way I sometimes “crave” chocolate, or “crave” cigarettes (yes, I still crave, and actively resist, cigarettes). There is, however, at least one non-vegan food that I actively missed for many years after I became vegan, and would still miss were it not for a few excellent substitutes: half and half in my coffee. You may be thinking that this is a pretty random thing to miss. Not really. Thus far, I have yet to find a truly ideal vegan cream substitute for coffee. It’s neutral, not overly sweet, very creamy, and the ingredient label isn’t too bad. Next up? Soymilk xo

indian-spiced vegetable fritters As you may have noticed, I’m not the kind of person who just throws together things in the kitchen without a map, compass, 637 glowing reviews on Epicurious or a friend’s sworn assurance, sometimes written, that a specific recipe is a guaranteed to blow the ennui right out of your taste buds. Sure, I’ll make small adjustments while I work on something to accommodate our personal preferences, but aside from pasta sauces, eggs and salad dressings, I rarely go it on my own intuition. You see, my intuition has led me to all sort of unsavory places, in and out of the kitchen, though I’ll save the latter for another time, or say, encyclopedia volume. As for cooking, one time, my homemade oatmeal made me so violently ill, I had to cancel a date. (Though perhaps, that was some conniving intuition, after all, as it was not with Alex. Cue: swoon or nausea.) Last year, I came across a recipe for Indian potato pancakes on Epicurious. Indian-Spiced Vegetable Fritters with Curry-Lime Yogurt

Tomato Basil Pizza The other day, I was looking at the overload of tomatoes that I bought as the season was winding down as the end of summer nears. But I realized that I was being gradually shoved out of my small kitchen by them, so I oven-roasted the louts with garlic and herbs to reclaim a few precious inches back of kitchen counter space. Yet when they were finished, I looked in my refrigerator, and there wasn’t any room in there either. So I was left holding a bowl of roasted tomatoes that needed to get used up. Coincidentally, I also had a round of yeasted dough in my refrigerator from a batch of recipe testing that hadn’t found its meaning as something else yet—as experimental leftovers are want to do. I’ve oven-roasted plenty of tomatoes in my lifetime, especially when I need to pull and extract as much flavor as I can from less-than-exemplary specimens. Basically, you just take some tomatoes, toss them in a splash of olive oil, some herbs, and sliced up garlic. (I know, I know. Chewswise Pesto

Baked Tomato, Garlic, and Basil Bruschetta Bites | PETA.org - StumbleUpon Finger foods are my favorite kind of food—to eat but not to make. That’s because they usually take a bit more work to put together than the full-size versions. Luckily, that’s not the case with these delicious bruschetta bites. They’re bursting with flavor and can be assembled in 15 minutes or less! So, preheat your oven, grab a loaf of your favorite baguette, and get out the cutting board. Bruschetta bites are the perfect edible addition to any gathering, and they’re great to serve at holiday parties. Baked Bruschetta Bites 15 sugar plum tomatoes, diced 12 basil leaves, cut into ribbons 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 Tbsp. onion powder 1 tsp. olive oil 1 tsp. soy sauce 1 tsp. black pepper 1/2 loaf French baguette, thinly sliced Preheat the oven to 350ºF.In a bowl, combine all the ingredients except the bread and mix well. Makes 4 servings

How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother Recipe If you've ever tasted pesto in Italy you know that the pesto here in the United States just isn't the same. I received a lesson in how to make pesto from a real Italian grandmother last week and now I understand the difference and what makes it so. My friend Francesca makes the trip from her small town near the pesto-epicenter of Genoa, Italy to San Francisco once or twice a year - this time (lucky for us) she brought her mom and two-year old son Mattia. Her mom makes a beautiful pesto (and perfectly light, potato gnocchi to go along with it) and offered to show me and my friend Jen how it is done. Most of the pesto you encounter here in the U.S. is different for a few reasons. During my lesson I quickly began to realize chopping all the ingredients by hand and not blending them is key because this prevents the ingredients from becoming a completely homogenized emulsion or paste. Another thing, Genovese pesto is famous in part because it is often made with young, small basil leaves.

To Die For Vegan Mac & Cheese Recipe with Sweet Potato By Aylin Erman, EcoSalon A childhood favorite revamped. There’s something incredibly nostalgic about macaroni and cheese. Even if you rarely ate the meal as a kid, you most certainly recognized the commercials for the box brands and knew what it was. For me, mac & cheese was an after-school staple, a weekend lunch, a quick dinner that never fell short of filling the carb and cheese quota I necessitated as a youngster. But it’s no nutritional powerhouse. Using Kraft Macaroni & Cheese as an example, box brands include the likes of whey, milkfat, milk protein concentrate, salt, sodium tripolyphosphate, citric acid, sodium phosphate, lactic acid, milk, calcium phosphate, yellow 5, yellow 6, cheese culture, and enzymes. And while homemade macaroni and cheese both is better for you and can cut the sodium, enzymes and preservatives from the mix, the classic recipe made from scratch will include the following: white pasta, butter, plain white flour, milk, and grated cheese. Serves 1 Ingredients:

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