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DCHS ACT Math Question of the Day

DCHS ACT Math Question of the Day

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Standards for Mathematical Practice "Does this make sense?" Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary.

The Crow and the Pitcher: Investigating Linear Functions Using a Literature-Based Model Introduce the activity by asking what the students know about Aesop’s Fables. Aesop’s fables are short, fantastical tales written by Aesop, an ancient Greek storyteller. The tales are often characterized by a moral. Read students the fable ”The Crow and Pitcher” from the overhead. Tasks, Units & Student Work - Common Core Library Keywords (optional) Enter keywords (e.g., K.OA.3, informational text, arguments, quadratic equations, etc.) Grade (select at least one) Subject (select one) NYC educators and national experts are developing Common Core-aligned tasks embedded in a unit of study to support schools in implementing the Citywide Instructional Expectations.

Model Curriculum: Mathematics (K-12) Mathematics (K-12) REVISED Model Curriculum – June 2014 The model curriculum is intended as a tool to support districts in their own curricular planning. During its development, teams of educators used all available information about the Common Core State Standards and PARCC to appropriately organize and sequence the standards across five units. Virtual Math Lab If you have any comments about this website email Kim Seward at kseward@mail.wtamu.edu This site is brought to you by West Texas A&M University (WTAMU). It was created by Kim Seward with the assistance of Jennifer Puckett. It is currently being maintained by Kim Seward. Disclaimer: WTAMU and Kim Seward are not responsible for how a student does on any test or any class for any reason including not being able to access the website due to any technology problems. We cannot guarantee that you will pass your math class after you go through this website.

Why Is Teaching With Problem Solving Important to Student Learning? Brief Problem solving plays an important role in mathematics and should have a prominent role in the mathematics education of K-12 students. However, knowing how to incorporate problem solving meaningfully into the mathematics curriculum is not necessarily obvious to mathematics teachers. (The term “problem solving” refers to mathematical tasks that have the potential to provide intellectual challenges for enhancing students’ mathematical understanding and development.) Fortunately, a considerable amount of research on teaching and learning mathematical problem solving has been conducted during the past 40 years or so and, taken collectively; this body of work provides useful suggestions for both teachers and curriculum writers. The following brief provides some directions on teaching with problem solving based on research.

Brain Teasers Sliding Triangle The triangle at left lies on a flat surface and is pushed at the top vertex. The length of the congruent sides does not change, but the angle between the two congruent sides will increase, and the base will stretch. Initially, the area of the triangle will increase, but eventually the area will decrease, continuing until the triangle collapses. What is the maximum area achieved during this process? And, what is the length of the base when this process is used to create a different triangle whose area is the same as the triangle above?

School Handbook - MATHCOUNTS MATHCOUNTS School Handbook Each year the MATHCOUNTS School Handbook is provide for free to every middle school in the U.S. It contains 300 creative problems meeting National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards for grades 6-8. Problems are indexed according to topic, difficulty level, and are mapped to the Common Core State Standards.

Examples of Formative Assessment When incorporated into classroom practice, the formative assessment process provides information needed to adjust teaching and learning while they are still happening. The process serves as practice for the student and a check for understanding during the learning process. The formative assessment process guides teachers in making decisions about future instruction. Here are a few examples that may be used in the classroom during the formative assessment process to collect evidence of student learning.

Problems of the Month Problem solving is the cornerstone of doing mathematics. A problem that you can’t solve in less than a day is usually a problem that is similar to one that you have solved before. But in real life, a problem is a situation that confronts you and you don’t have an idea of where to even start. If we want our students to be problem solvers and mathematically powerful, we must model perseverance and challenge students with non-routine problems. Administrators, teachers and parents should facilitate and support students in the process of attacking and reasoning about the problems.

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