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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, and choral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers, and his influence on subsequent Western art music is profound; Beethoven composed his own early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Haydn wrote that "posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years. Early life Family and childhood Anonymous portrait of the child Mozart, possibly by Pietro Antonio Lorenzoni; painted in 1763 on commission from Leopold Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born on 27 January 1756 to Leopold Mozart (1719–1787) and Anna Maria, née Pertl (1720–1778), at 9 Getreidegasse in Salzburg. Leopold Mozart, a native of Augsburg,[7] was a minor composer and an experienced teacher. When Nannerl was seven, she began keyboard lessons with her father while her three-year-old brother looked on. These early pieces, K. 1–5, were recorded in the Nannerl Notenbuch. 1762–73: Travel Vienna Related:  Wikipedia C

Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven ( i/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbeɪ.toʊvən/; German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːt.hoːfən] ( Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn. Biography Background and early life Prince-Elector's Palace (Kurfürstliches Schloss) in Bonn, where the Beethoven family had been active since the 1730s Beethoven was born of this marriage in Bonn. Beethoven's first music teacher was his father. A portrait of the 13-year-old Beethoven by an unknown Bonn master (c. 1783) Maximilian Frederick's successor as the Elector of Bonn was Maximilian Franz, the youngest son of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, and he brought notable changes to Bonn. Establishing his career in Vienna Musical maturity

Intervall - diatoni och kromatik Läran om (ton)intervall är viktig, i och med att den bland annat kan vara ett nytt hjälpmedel i samband med musikanalys, ackorduppbyggnad och gehörslära. Därför följer här en artikel som beskriver de viktigaste aspekterna av intervalläran. Se också Intervallfinnaren. Ett intervall är ett avstånd mellan två toner. Intervall kan beskrivas som: - harmoniska intervall (kallas också samklangsintervall): om två toner klingar samtidigt. - melodiska intervall: om två toner klingar efter varandra. 2. Intervallen utgår från stamtonerna (de vita tangenterna på pianot), och ges namn efter avståndet mallan intervallets två toner - båda tonerna inräknade. Man kan i princip fortsätta med sammansättningarna sextdecima, septimdecima osv., men i praktiken används de inte. Denna skillnad i intervallstorleken är ofta viktig att få med när intervallet ska namnges, och ett intervall kan därför (om man bortser från de förminskade och överstigande intervallen) vara antingen litet, stort eller rent. 3. 5. 6.

Alfred the Great Alfred the Great (849 – 26 October 899) (Old English: Ælfrēd, Ælfrǣd, "elf counsel") was King of Wessex from 871 to 899. Alfred successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and by the time of his death had become the dominant ruler in England.[1] He is the only English monarch to be accorded the epithet "the Great".[2][3] Alfred was the first King of the West Saxons to style himself "King of the Anglo-Saxons". Details of Alfred's life are described in a work by the 10th century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser. Alfred's reputation has been that of a learned and merciful man who encouraged education and improved his kingdom's legal system, military structure and his people's quality of life. Childhood[edit] Alfred was born in the village of Wanating, now Wantage, Oxfordshire. In 853, at the age of four, Alfred is said to have been sent to Rome where, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle,[5] he was confirmed by Pope Leo IV who "anointed him as king".

Michael Jackson | The Official Michael Jackson Site Franz Schubert 1875 oil painting by Wilhelm August Rieder, after his own 1825 watercolor portrait Franz Peter Schubert (German pronunciation: [ˈfʁant͡s ˈʃuːbɐt]; 31 January 1797 – 19 November 1828) was an Austrian composer. In a short lifespan of less than 32 years, Schubert was a prolific composer, writing some 600 Lieder, ten complete or nearly complete symphonies, liturgical music, operas, incidental music and a large body of chamber and solo piano music. Appreciation of his music while he was alive was limited to a relatively small circle of admirers in Vienna, but interest in his work increased significantly in the decades immediately after his death. Felix Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann, Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and other 19th-century composers discovered and championed his works. Today, Schubert is ranked among the greatest composers of the early Romantic era and, as such, is one of the most frequently performed composers of the early nineteenth century. Biography[edit] Vogl and Schubert

Circle of fifths Circle of fifths showing major and minor keys Nikolay Diletsky's circle of fifths in Idea grammatiki musikiyskoy (Moscow, 1679) In music theory, the circle of fifths (or circle of fourths) is a visual representation of the relationships among the 12 tones of the chromatic scale, their corresponding key signatures, and the associated major and minor keys. Definition[edit] Structure and use[edit] Pitches within the chromatic scale are related not only by the number of semitones between them within the chromatic scale, but also related harmonically within the circle of fifths. Octaves (7 × 1200 = 8400) versus fifths (12 × 700 = 8400), depicted as with Cuisenaire rods (red (2) is used for 1200, black (7) is used for 700). Diatonic key signatures[edit] The circle is commonly used to represent the relationship between diatonic scales. For minor scales, rotate the letters counter-clockwise by 3, so that, e.g., A minor has 0 sharps or flats and E minor has 1 sharp. Play . In lay terms[edit] .

Friedrich Schiller Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller (German: [ˈjoːhan ˈkʁɪstɔf ˈfʁiːdʁɪç fɔn ˈʃɪlɐ]; 10 November 1759 – 9 May 1805) was a German poet, philosopher, historian, and playwright. During the last seventeen years of his life (1788–1805), Schiller struck up a productive, if complicated, friendship with already famous and influential Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. They frequently discussed issues concerning aesthetics, and Schiller encouraged Goethe to finish works he left as sketches. Early life and career[edit] Although the family was happy in Lorch, Schiller's father found his work unsatisfying. In 1766, the family left Lorch for the Duke of Württemberg's principal residence, Ludwigsburg. There the Schiller boy came to the attention of Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg. While at the Karlsschule, Schiller read Rousseau and Goethe and discussed Classical ideals with his classmates. In 1780, he obtained a post as regimental doctor in Stuttgart, a job he disliked. Marriage and family[edit]

Michael Haydn Michael Haydn Johann Michael Haydn (German: [ˈhaɪdən] ( Life[edit] Michael Haydn was born in 1737 in the Austrian village of Rohrau, near the Hungarian border. Michael's early professional career path was paved by his older brother Joseph, whose skillful singing had landed him a position as a boy soprano in the St. "Reutter was so captivated by [Joseph]'s talents that he declared to his father that even if he had twelve sons he would take care of them all. The same source indicates that Michael was a brighter student than Joseph, and that (particularly when Joseph had grown enough to have trouble keeping his soprano voice) it was Michael's singing that was the more admired. Shortly after he left the choir school, Michael was appointed Kapellmeister at Nagyvárad (Großwardein, Oradea) and later, in 1762, at Salzburg, where he remained for 43 years, during which he wrote over 360 compositions comprising both church and instrumental music. Leopold Mozart criticized Haydn's heavy drinking.[4]

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