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Nine Things to Consider When Looking For Your Survival House

Nine Things to Consider When Looking For Your Survival House
image from Seattle Municipal Archives You don’t need a bunker in a remote location in Idaho or Montana to have a home that is able to withstand an emergency situation. However, there are a few things you’ll want to consider when choosing where to live as your home is an often overlooked but important part of your preparedness efforts. If you’re looking to relocate (or just want to run your current location through a survival checkup), here are a few important things to consider that affect the security and survivability of your home. 1. Neighborhood–How is the crime rate? 2. 3. Weather hazards can encompass large areas, so are sometimes difficult to avoid. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Bonus #10. My home is my castle (albeit a very small castle). Related:  Homestead Planning & DesignSelf Sustaining / SurvivalSecure Safety

Adaptable House caters for growing family, home office, retired living, or divorce It uses sliding partitions and storage walls, extension modules and a puzzle of garden components. Danish architects Henning Larsen's new Adaptable House is designed to accommodate the most common lifestyle changes, from having children to settling into retirement. The energy-efficient home can even be fairly separated in case of divorce. View all Realized with developers Realdania Byg and contractors GXN, the Adaptable House not only offers flexible room arrangements, but has a built-in strategy for extending and separating volumes. Pre-figuring life changes The Adaptable House was conceived to help meet a range of lifestyle changes. Perhaps the most innovative and coolly pragmatic gesture is in adapting for divorce. Sliding partitions make flexible interiors (Photo: Jesper Ray/Realdania Byg) Not just a room under the stairs The architects were determined that any new configurations meet their criteria for natural light, ventilation, plus noise and temperature control. Adding on

The 12 Rules of Survival | Security Whip The 12 Rules of Survival has been out of a couple of years now, but it never hurts to reread them. Read the whole book “ Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why ” if you get an opportunity! Also, check out his new book “Lucy” at www.laurencegonzales.com ! By Laurence Gonzales As a journalist, I’ve been writing about accidents for more than thirty years. Survival should be thought of as a journey, a vision quest of the sort that native Americans have had as a rite of passage for thousands of years. Don’t fall into the deadly trap of denial or of immobilizing fear. Many people who in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, died simply because they told themselves that everything was going to be all right. Survivors see opportunity, even good, in their situation, however grim. In the initial crisis, survivors are not ruled by fear; instead, they make use of it. Survivors also manage pain well. Yes you might die. Now, What is the reason for this?

The Fantastic Four ? 4 Essential Wild Edible Plants that May Just Save Your Life | Tactical Intelligence Did you realize that knowing just 4 wild edible plants could one day save your life? If there were any four categories of plants that I would recommend all people to know how to use and identify it would be these: Grass, Oak, Pine, and Cattail. For the knowledgeable survivor, knowing just these four plants can make the difference between life and death if stranded in the wilds – for each one is an excellent food source which can sustain you until help arrives. Throughout this week and part of the next, I’ll be going into details on how you can prepare and eat these plants. For now though, here’s a quick overview into what they have to offer: Grass Surprising to many is the fact that you can eat grass. The young shoots up to 6 inches tall can be eaten raw and the starchy base (usually white and at the bottom when you pluck it) can be eaten as a trail nibble. Oak Oak – specifically the acorn – is a great source of food in the fall and early winter time. Pine “You can eat pine?!” Cattail

Mars After interrupting daytime shows willy nilly to show live feeds of car chases and gun battles with innocent lives at risk, then taunting me nightly with more tales of violence, the local news runs what seems to be a much needed series: "Surviving Danger: What You Need to Know." Suitably cowed, I watch. After fifty seconds of real-life scenes of terror (as if I needed to be reminded), a cheery reporter offers this ten-second sound byte of advice: "If you're caught in a dangerous situation, experts say, don't do a thing. Cooperate. Don't distress the criminal. No doubt this is wise counsel. Avert your eyes and don't add to the trouble. Mars likes action. Mars is not delicate. We have a contract with our archetypes. What is not given conscious expression emerges in shadow form, through fantasy, unconscious action, or projection. Mars craves a mission. When Mars goes wrong it's often not the planet but the mission that's at fault. Energy Crisis My friend Cheryl has a 4th house Mars.

Being Somewhere - Low Impact Living What Kind Of Small Farm Is Right For You? So, you're planning a small farm, but you're not sure if you want to have a hobby farm, a homestead, or a small farm business. What do you do? How do you decide on the best fit? Consider Your Goals The first thing to think about is, what do you want out of your small farm? For example, are you an entrepreneurial type who gets warm and glowy when you envision creating value-added farm products and selling them at farmers markets, or growing vegetables on acres of farmland and selling them in bulk to restaurants? Set Goals for Your Small Farm Hobby Farming Hobby farming is for people who have another primary source of income and want to have a farm that doesn't have to produce income or support them by providing for most or all of their needs. Hobby farmers can put a lot of money into their hobby farms, or they can run them more like a homestead in that they want to minimize how much money they use as an input. How to Start a Hobby Farm A Small Farm Business How to Start a Small Farm Business

The Top 50 Survival Blogs! Basic Survival Tips Author: Jeff Durham - Updated: 22 April 2014| Comment If you regularly spend time in the woods, wilderness, mountains, on water or in any other places in which you may be faced with emergencies and may have to rely on your ability for survival, it's important to know what to do and what your priorities should be. Knowing your priorities is one thing but that will all count for nothing unless you're mentally prepared too. There are a number of things you'll need to address when faced with a survival situation and whilst these priorities may differ slightly depending on the nature of the emergency; they'll all need to be addressed with finding shelter almost always being the most important priority. A Shelter For Survival A shelter is crucial on a number of levels. Fire Once you have built your shelter, the next thing to do is to light a fire. Water And Survival Water is your next survival priority. First Aid Administration Food And Survival Navigation and Rescue You might also like... Title:

resources on war, peace, and nonviolence This page can help you find alternatives to war and violence. Our links page includes more than 150 links to peace and social justice groups. Our featured group page gives a link to an outstanding peace and justice group. On this site you will also find information on how to order our publications on peace and alternatives to violence. Important Note: Resources for Peace is a web resource only. War Prayer Available for Download Mark Twain's classic anti-war short story, which has been both in and out of print over the years, is now available in a new edition suitable for reading on your computer screen or printing out for copying and distribution. Updates Information on this page will be updated and revised as time and resources permit.

How to Build an Outdoor Mud Oven for Use Now and When the SHTF As part of a recent giveaway, one of the questions I asked was “What DIY project would you like to see featured on Backdoor Survival?” There were some amazing responses and over time, I hope to work through the list. Interestingly enough, two readers requested a similar topic and when more than one reader makes a request, I sit up and pay attention. The DIY projects were: 1. As luck would have it, this is a familiar topic since awhile back, I featured an article on DIY mud ovens. For those of you that are new to the concept, outdoor Mud Ovens are common in third world countries where indoor cooking facilities are nominal and where cooking fuel consists of wood and biomass. here is the full article: How to Build an Outdoor Mud Oven Rocket stoves and outdoor grills are great for cooking in a pot or skillet when the power is down or non-existent following a disaster or a worst case SHTF situation where fuel is either flat-out unavailable or intolerably expensive. The Quest for A Mud Oven

nifty list of concerns to add to one's house hunting or construction lists by mojojuju Feb 8

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