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Get Everything Done

Get Everything Done
This website is the home of Mark Forster’s The ground-breaking time management system To access the initial instructions for the system entirely free of charge, together with developments, View the Newsletter Archive. Russian translation by Yuliya Galkina http://serabal.blogspot.ru/ “Many thanks to Mark for the new system, the two words that come to mind are ‘powerful’ and ‘elegant’.

http://markforster.squarespace.com/

Getting Things Done: Step 2/3 - Processing & Organizing - CBS MoneyWatch.com This article is part three of a seven part series on Getting Things Done ? (GTD ? ) -- the time and productivity management system by David Allen. Columns In Series: GTD Post #1: Getting Things Done: Introduction GTD Post #2: Getting Things Done: Step 1 - Collection Getting Things Done: Step 2/3 - Processing & Organizing Now that you've Collected, you should have a huge stack of stuff as well as a bunch of index cards. At this point, you might start to freak out a bit. "What am I supposed to do with all this stuff? A Beginner's Guide to Making a D*I*Y Planner Many first-time visitors to this site are probably overwhelmed by the vast number of pages, templates, packages, sizes and loose forms available. This little all-in-one guide is meant to direct beginners to downloading the right packages, printing and preparing the forms, and setting up a basic planner or Hipster PDA using the D*I*Y Planner kits. The goal here is to teach you how to create an effective industrial-strength planner system that can last for years, yet costs next to nothing. This page might look a little complicated at first glance, but you'll be surprised by how little work is generally involved, especially after a little practice. For example, I can now create a dozen double-sided punched forms in about three to four minutes, including printing, by using basic (i.e., "cheap") equipment.

Successful Delegation - Team management training from MindTools Using the Power of Other People's Help © iStockphoto/AlexRaths Even "Super You" needs help and support. There is no shame in asking for assistance. More by Doing Less - Tony Schwartz by Tony Schwartz | 7:40 AM December 13, 2011 Two people of equal skill work in the same office. For the sake of comparison, let’s say both arrive at work at 9 am each day, and leave at 7 pm. Bill works essentially without stopping, juggling tasks at his desk and running between meetings all day long.

» Simplifying David Allen’s Complicated GTD Setup Every Monday is Productivity & Organization Day at Zen Habits. Take a look at the setup on the right. It was published in a recent CNNMoney article on David Allen and GTD, and it outlines The David’s GTD setup. Building a Smarter To-Do List, Part I Since new folks visit 43F each day, I thought it might be valuable to return to one of our most popular evergreen topics to review some "best practices" for keeping a good to-do list. While a lot of this might be old hat to some of you, it's a good chance to review the habits and patterns behind one of the most powerful tools in the shed. Part 2 appears tomorrow (Update: now available). (N.B.: links to previous posts related to these topics are provided inline)

About 43 Folders Listen: 43 Folders is Merlin Mann’s website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work. And, Hello. Study Hacks The Opposite of the Open Office October 19th, 2016 · 12 comments The Bionic Office A couple weeks ago, I wrote about Joel Spolsky’s claim that Facebook’s massive open office is scaring away talent. The comments on the post added many interesting follow ups; e.g., a pointer to a recent podcast episode where a Facebook developer claims the office is rarely more than a third full as people have learned to stay home if they want to produce anything deep. A critique of open offices, however, inspires a natural follow-up question: what works better?

Tac Anderson One of the more popular things I’ve posted online is my Hacked GTD Moleskine system. I first posted my system over four years ago, back in 2009 and have frequently updated it. I’ve been getting a lot of questions lately so I figured it’s time to update it again.

"One of the most basic distinctions to make in our lives is the difference between action and activity" by reg360 Dec 6

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