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50 Books That Will Make You a Better Writer

50 Books That Will Make You a Better Writer
Literary genius — or at least competence — never blossoms in a vacuum. As much as many creative types like to pose as a mysterious lone wolves skulking through the fringes of society without ever becoming a cog in the machine, man, even their works have been shaped by their external experiences up to that point. Even a whole rejection of society still involves relation to it, albeit one defined by absence than presence. So despite what that "free spirit" in composition class claims, reaching out to fellow writers can still prove beneficial to those hoping to pursue the art as either a career or a hobby. Soaking up advice through any reads available opens up new worlds and ideas and can help mold a work from just OK to just plain awesome. Obviously, one must not take this article’s title too literally. Classics The Elements of Style by William F. Composition and Rhetoric The Office of Assertion by Scott F. Genre and Medium Literary Criticism, Reading and Analysis Notable Writers Related:  book lists

Write & Get Paid Get Paid $100 Do you want to earn money online? Listverse was built on the efforts of readers just like you. Readers who didn’t have any experience as writers but decided to put a list together and send it in. So here is the deal: We will pay you $100 for your efforts. You don’t need to be an expert—you just need to have English equal to that of a native speaker, a sense of humor, and a love for things unusual or interesting. It works like this: You write your list (10 items per list minimum), you send it in, we reply and say “Great—we’ll publish it” and send you $100 by PayPal (don’t have an account? Either way you win—your list will be read by us and reviewed, and if it’s amazing it will appear on the front page of Listverse to be read by millions of people a month! We can not accept lists from writers who do not have a PayPal account; this is non-negotiable. The Rules The rules are really pretty simple. Pictures and Video Please note that we publish original articles. Ready to start?

List of steampunk works Steampunk is a subgenre of fantasy and speculative fiction that came into prominence in the 1980s and early 1990s. The term denotes works set in an era or world where steam power is still widely used—usually the 19th century, and often set in Victorian era England—but with prominent elements of either science fiction or fantasy, such as fictional technological inventions like those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, or real technological developments like the computer occurring at an earlier date. Other examples of steampunk contain alternate history-style presentations of "the path not taken" of such technology as dirigibles or analog computers; these frequently are presented in an idealized light, or with a presumption of functionality. Although many works now considered seminal to the genre were published in the 1960s and 1970s, the term steampunk originated in the late 1980s[1] as a tongue in cheek variant of cyberpunk. Precursors[edit] H. In literature[edit]

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Think of your laptop as a machine like the one at the gym where you open and close your inner thighs in front of everyone, exposing both your insecurities and your genitals. Because that is what writing is all about. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts. The blank white page. Mark Twain once said, “Show, don’t tell.” Finding a really good muse these days isn’t easy, so plan on going through quite a few before landing on a winner. There are two things more difficult than writing. It’s no secret that great writers are great readers, and that if you can’t read, your writing will often suffer.

Free-eBooks.net | Download free Fiction, Health, Romance and many more ebooks How To Greet Death h2g2 - The Guide to Life, The Universe and Everything The 100 Best Science Books of All Time - Listmuse.com Image by Biblioteca de la Facultad de Derecho (CC BY 2.0) The 100 Best Science Books of All Time list contains a mixture of classic and popular works, chosen for their accessibility and relevance. Most of the books selected are suitable for a well educated layman with only a few being for a more serious reader. Each author is only represented by one book on the list. 1. By Charles Darwin | Used Price: 70% Off In The Origin of Species (1859) Darwin challenged many of the most deeply-held beliefs of the Western world. 2. By Richard Feynman | Used Price: 80% Off Celebrated for his brilliantly quirky insights into the physical world, Nobel laureate Richard Feynman also possessed an extraordinary talent for explaining difficult concepts to the general public. 3. By D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson | 70% Off Why do living things and physical phenomena take the form they do? 4. By Albert Einstein | Used Price: 50% Off 5. By James D. 6. By Lewis Thomas | Rock-bottom Price: $0.01 7. 9. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Using Real Psychology in Your Writing Using Real Psychology in Your Writing Using Archetypes in Your Stories Writing Better Romantic Relationships This series looks at the Anima/Animus archetype, which is most often seen in romantic relationships, and how to use it to create more compelling romantic relationships, regardless of genre. Looks at what the anima and animus are, how they're formed, and why fiction writers need to understand them. Creating Better Antagonists Three-Dimensional Villains: Finding Your Character’s Shadow - Using Jungian archetypes and hands-on exercises, this article teaches fiction writers to tap their own dark sides to create realistic villains who will really challenge the hero/es and keep tension high. - by Carolyn Kaufman, PsyD The Other in Fiction: Creating Wonderfully Wicked Villains - The kinds of villains that keep us riveted to a story tap the darkest aspects of the human heart; learn about what those aspects are and how to use them in your fiction. - by Carolyn Kaufman, PsyD

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