background preloader

Your Amazing Bran

Your Amazing Bran
The first stop on the virtual brain tour takes a look at the three main parts of the brain, the cerebral cortex, the cerebellum and the brain stem. It also explores the four brain lobes: the frontal lobe, the parietal lobe, the temporal lobe and the occipital lobe. The first part of the brain to evolve some 500 million years ago was the brain stem. It is also known as the reptilian brain or lower brain. Certain ‘hardwired’ body functions e.g., breathing and blood pressure, as well as some basic human instincts like danger are controlled by the lower brain. The cerebellum evolved about 400 million years ago and is also known as the hind brain. The limbic brain (we will explore this brain in detail later) was the third part of the brain to evolve between 300 and 200 million years ago and is sometimes called the mid brain. The final part of the brain to evolve was the cerebrum (cerebral cortex), also called the upper brain. Each half of the cerebrum is split into four lobes. Parietal Lobe Related:  Interactives; Virtual Tours; Virtual Labs

Vintage Hills Elementary School: Virtual Worlds and Field Trips Secret Builders is a safe, fun virtual world where kids live, learn and play in an interactive, educational setting. Become a world traveler in this virtual world! 50 Really Cool Online Tools for Science Teachers A 21st-century education revolves around the Internet for everything from collaboration, tools, lessons, and even earning degrees online. If you are looking for ways to integrate online learning into your science class or science degree programs, then take a look at these cool online tools that are just perfect for both teachers and students. Science Tools to Use with Students These tools offer opportunities for learning about climate, cells, the human body, nature, and more. ChemiCool. AP Tools Whether you are setting up a new AP curriculum or are just looking for additional material to use with your AP science students, these tools will help. Advanced Placement Biology. Websites and Resources for Science Teachers These websites are chock full of amazing resources and tools for science teachers. Discovery Education. Calculators Use these informative environmental calculators with your students. Ecological Footprint Quiz. Online Games Online Science Games. Google Earth Google Earth Ocean.

Edheads - Activate Your Mind! Brain Hemispheres Imagine looking down through the top of your head onto the cortex of your brain. You would see that is made up of two halves called hemispheres: one on the left (the left brain) and one on the right (the right brain). This is the upstairs part of your brain! The left and right brains are connected by an intricate network of nerve fibres called the corpus callosum. It was the ancient Egyptians who first noticed that the left brain tends to control the right side of the body and the right brain tends to control the left side of the body. Although each hemisphere is almost identical in terms of structure, each hemisphere operates in an entirely different way and are associated with very different activities. Left Hemisphere The left brain is the logical brain responsible for words, logic, numbers, analysis, lists, linearity and sequence. Right Hemisphere Corpus Callosum Click here to continue your virtual tour of your amazing brain……..

6 Virtual Tours Of The Human Body For Free Interactive Anatomy Lessons When it comes to interactive virtual views, we have gone to space and around the globe. So, it’s not surprising that we are also going within ourselves on a virtual journey of the human body. One of the finest tools available online is Visible Body. Unfortunately, it’s not free anymore. But you can see the beauty of it thanks to the free demo that allows you to explore the head and neck. If you are disappointed that there aren’t any free interactive anatomy tools, worry not. Google Body You can trust Google to take you everywhere. The Google Body browser is a Google Labs project that renders on Google Chrome and any other browser that supports WebGL (like Firefox 4 Beta). MEDtropolis The interactive website aims to educate entertain both kids and adult on bodily health; understanding the human anatomical structure is just part of the process. For instance, check out the narrated tours on Virtual Body. eSkeletons eSkeletons isn’t only about understanding human anatomy. DirectAnatomy

NSDL.org - National Science Digital Library 25 Awesome Virtual Learning Experiences Online - Virtual Education Websites Just because you’re online doesn’t mean that you can’t experience the world first-hand — or as close to first-hand as possible. Here are websites that feature virtual learning experiences, exposing online visitors to everything from history to geography, astronomy to anatomy, literature to government. 7 Wonders Panoramas – 360-degree views of the Seven Wonders of the World. Arounder Virtual Tour of the Moon – 360-degree panoramic views of the moon, courtesy of the Apollo 11, 12 and 17 missions. (Many other Earth locations also available on arounder.com.) Frissiras Museum – A virtual art gallery from Athens, Greece that allows you to explore paintings by clicking through their entire collection. Google Earth – Explore the geography of both land and sea (free download). Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Vital Signs: Understanding Cardiovascular Diseases – A virtual gallery teaching about heart disease. Louvre Virtual Tour – Virtual tour of the world-famous Louvre museum in Paris. Mount St.

Limbic Brain Now imagine looking through the side of your head at a cross-section of your brain. You would see the downstairs part of your brain, the limbic brain. The limbic brain is located below the the cortex (upstairs), in front of the cerebellum and above the brain stem. The limbic brain evolved between 200 and 300 million years ago and is the seat of your emotions. The limbic brain is critical to learning and for short-term and long-term memory. The scientist Robert Ornstein says that the easiest way to remember the functions of the limbic brain is the four ‘F’s’ of survival : feeding, fighting, fleeing and sexual reproduction!! Cerebral Cortex The surface of the brain is called the CORTEX. The Thalamus The thalamus makes preliminary classifications of external information coming in the brain. Amygdala The amygdala is an almond shaped set of brain cells located deep within the temporal lobe of the brain. Basal Ganglia Pituitary Gland Hypothalamus

Yenka.com Lesson Plans The lesson plans presented here are a sampling from NWF's collection of over 1,000 lesson plans designed to introduce students to life science, ecology, wildlife biology, scientific identification and observation. All lesson plans are aligned to the National Science Education Standards. Check back regularly! We will be continually adding to our online library of resources for educators, beginning with the addition of lesson plans from our NatureScope series. Habitat Lessons designed to introduce students to concepts of ecology, habitat care and species identification: Energy Conservation Lessons designed to engage student in learning good conservation techniques and practices to use at home and at school: Energy Conservation: Did I Remember To… (grades 4-6) Ecosystems Lessons that explore ecosystems within the United States: ArcticWatersheds Wildlife Lessons that introduce students to wildlife and wildlife behavior:

Personal Finance and Economics Education Online Game for teachers teaching grades 6 through 12 students - Gen i Revolution Brain Cell Zoom in close enough on a section of your brain and you would see a dense network of cells. The cells that create brain activity are called neurons, cells which carry an electrical signal from one to another.Neurons are the building blocks of the brain. Each neuron connects with up to 100,000 neighbours in the worlds biggest cuddle! To the naked eye, neurons appear as the “grey matter” of the brain. A piece of brain the size of a pin head contains approximately 60,000 neurons. The Structure of the Brain Cell Each of the neurons has a cell body. Dendrites bring information to the cell body and axons take information away from the cell body. Cell Body The cell body houses the nucleus (which contains genetic code), and cytoplasm (which feeds the nucleus). Dendrites Dendrites branch out from the cell body. Schwann’s Cells These cells produce myelin. Node of Ranvier The myelin sheath is not continuous but is interrupted by the nodes of ranvier. Myelin Sheath Axon Axon Terminals Cell Nucleus

Related: