background preloader

WWI - Library of Congress, USA

WWI - Library of Congress, USA
Compiled by Kenneth Drexler, Digital Reference Specialist The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material related to World War I, including photographs, documents, newspapers, films, sheet music, and sound recordings. This guide compiles links to World War I resources throughout the Library of Congress Web site. In addition, this guide provides links to external Web sites focusing on World War I and a bibliography containing selections for both general and younger readers. Furthermore, as part of our commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the U.S. involvement in World War I, the Library of Congress has created a World War I portal to its extensive holdings on the subject of the war. This page also includes WWI-related content for teachers, blog postings, and details on lectures, programs, concerts and symposia related to the conflict. Library of Congress Web Site | External Web Sites | Selected Bibliography George S. John J. Patriotic Melodies Related:  World War OneEurope

Anzac Day Collection This documentary gave NZ viewers, for the first time, a Turkish view of the Gallipoli story. Produced for TVNZ and Turkish TV, it focuses on four young people, two Turks and two New Zealanders, descended from Gallipoli veterans, as they explore the grim reality of their ancestors’ experience. Six Māori Battalion soldiers camped in Italian ruins wait for night to fall. In the silence the bros-in-arms distract themselves with jokes before a tohu (sign) brings them back to reality. The story of the New Zealand Army's (28th) Māori Battalion, this Tainui Stephens documentary tells the stories of five men who served with the unit. This seminal 1984 documentary tells the stories of the New Zealand soldiers who were part of the identity-defining Gallipoli campaign in World War I. Actor Wi Kuki Kaa plays a Vietnam War veteran who is dislocated by his war experience and homeless. A live broadcast (for TV One) of the Anzac Day dawn service at Waikumete Cemetery.

Teaching European History With Star Trek | Milk and Cookies This post is the 2nd in a series written by my guest, Susan. Read part one: Teaching Ancient History With Star Trek. To Boldly Go…Into European History Of the three episodes that lend themselves well to approaching events in European history, two are among my very favorites. The first of these is “Wolf in the Fold”, which sets the story of Jack the Ripper on another planet. The other is “Patterns of Force,” which describes another just as fearful time, the reign of Nazi Germany. All Our Yesterdays Summary: Kirk, Spock, and McCoy are sent back in time. When to Watch: When studying 17th Century Witch Trials in Europe or America Vocabulary HenchmanAccomplice Questions and Activities The man called Kirk a slave. Wolf in the Fold Note for Parents: Just like the topic itself, this episode is not suitable for young children. Summary: Scotty is accused of multiples murders. When to Watch: When studying 1880′s England. HedonisticExpediteRegressive Trivia: Patterns of Force Subcutaneous

Første Verdenskrig - Den Store Krig - 1914-18 - Nationalmuseet Hvad er Cookies? Cookies anvendes i dag i forbindelse med stort set alle hjemmesider og er i mange tilfælde nødvendige for at levere services på hjemmesiden. En cookie er en lille tekstfil, som gemmes på brugerens IT-udstyr (PC, tablet, smartphone e.l.), så udstyret kan genkendes. Cookies kan blandt andet bruges til at udarbejde statistik over brugernes anvendelse af hjemmesiden, til optimering af sidens indhold og til markedsføring. En cookie er en passiv fil og kan således ikke indsamle oplysninger fra brugerens computer eller sprede computervirus eller andre skadelige programmer. Nogle cookies placeres af andre parter (såkaldte tredjeparter) end den, som står i adresselinjen (URL’en) i browseren. Du kan til enhver tid ændre eller tilbagetrække dit samtykke på vores hjemmeside. Ejer- og kontaktoplysninger Nationalmuseet Ny Vestergade 10, Prinsens Palæ DK-1471, København K. e-mail: digital.post@natmus.dk (sikker post) Få mere at vide om hvordan vi behandler persondata i vores Privatlivspolitik.

World War One Battlefields : Home Page Welcome | First World War Poetry Digital Archive The First World War Poetry Digital Archive is an online repository of over 7000 items of text, images, audio, and video for teaching, learning, and research. The heart of the archive consists of collections of highly valued primary material from major poets of the period, including Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, and Edward Thomas. This is supplemented by a comprehensive range of multimedia artefacts from the Imperial War Museum, a separate archive of over 6,500 items contributed by the general public, and a set of specially developed educational resources. These educational resources include an exciting new exhibition in the three-dimensional virtual world Second Life. Freely available to the public as well as the educational community, the First World War Poetry Digital Archive is a significant resource for studying the First World War and the literature it inspired.

WW100 New Zealand A selection of sites and sources for learning about the history of the First World War from a New Zealand perspective, and the role your family members might have played in it. Soldiers inside the YMCA library in Beauvois, France. Ref: 1/2-013635-G. Courtesy of Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. Starting Places Use these websites to start your learning journey. New Zealand and the First World War history Get an overview of the history of New Zealand and the First World War. Researching First World War soldiers Read a guide to researching New Zealand soldiers and related service personnel. Cenotaph database & personnel files Discover whether someone in your family served. Use personnel files to get more detail about First World War soldiers, from Archives New Zealand. A guide to understanding personnel files is available. Digital New Zealand search Filter by ‘usage rights’ to see how you can use the material you find. Further sites and sources Guides to specific collections

Castle Architecture Although castle architecture developed over the centuries in line with weapons technology, the principles remained much the same. A good castle provided a secure base that could be easily defended. It needed defenses against frontal attack (thick, high walls and secure entry gates) and from undermining (rock foundations or a moat). It furnished means of repelling attackers while minimising exposure of the defenders (arrow loops, crenellation, machicolations, murder holes). Further, it needed facilities to withstand a siege - a fresh water supply or large cistern and vast supplies of food. A good castle had no dead-spaces - ie external areas that defenders could not fire on, but did provide multiple locations from which vulnerable points could be defended. The best castles provided rings of defence so that defenders could hold out from a citadel even if the outer defences failed. Castles also needed facilities for a garison and living quarters.

World War I Document Archive The Wilfred Owen Association European stories & official histories Changing Times Welcome to the Changing Times section - one thousand years at the press of a button with lots of pictures! Please select an option from the ones below to discover the 15 themes within each section. Click on the timeline to find out dates and which king or queen was on the throne from Norman times to the present day. Related worksheets: Normans (PDF 137 KB) Medieval (PDF 140 KB) Tudors (PDF 140 KB) Stuarts (PDF 139 KB) Georgians (PDF 140 KB) Victorians (PDF 142 KB) Twentieth Century (PDF 143 KB)

Related:  jvoll