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Wilkinson Residence in Portland is one swanky treehouse

Wilkinson Residence in Portland is one swanky treehouse
Evoking the feeling of being in a tree house is exactly what the beautiful Wilkinson residence in Portland does. Located on a flag lot, the extraordinary house is brilliantly designed to perfectly blend with the natural landscape. A steep sloping grade provided the opportunity to bring the main level of the house into the tree canopy. Catering to the desire of the client, Wilkinson Residence designed a dwelling that not only became part of the natural landscape but also addressed the flow of music. It has a natural wood ceiling that wonderfully floats on curved laminated wood beams, passing through a generous glass wall, which wraps around the main living room. The interior space of this amazing house flows seamlessly through to the exterior. Via: Boingboing Related:  Organic

Architecture Imagine the renovation dilemmas. A huge penthouse of a converted 1930s office building in TriBeCa, New York, is to be turned into a functioning home for a family with three teenagers. In fact, we can not quite imagine the issues that faced Steven Harris Architects when the family showed up, literally, at the doorstep of the celebrated architect and asked if he’d like to work on their home. Harris said yes and proceeded to make his magic. The scale of the apartment is huge and the freedom from budget constraints allowed for some spectacular solutions. Harris’s work is often distinguished by clarity and light, by the use of glass, by the maximization of views and, above all, bold solutions. What emerged as a result of the TriBeCa Penthouse project, is a multi-level (27th and 28th floors) nearly 8,000 square-foot (743 square meter) family-friendly residence that includes self-contained guest quarters and a new glass-and-teak-beam rooftop pavilion that functions as a recreation room.

Tropical escape: magical safari house - San Diego interior decorating This unique retreat is located in Kenya, Africa, owned and designed by the very talented Italian designer Marzia Chierichetti. Marzia studied Art and Interior Design in Milan, she later got into jewelry and other types of design when she moved to Kenya. This stunning rustic retreat is nestled amongst sand-dunes and coconut palms on a broad Indian ocean beach. Marzia allowed her surrounding elements to inspire her, her imagination went rampant in this wild place. She created her own beautiful refuge, a house of light, flowing lines and quiet space; open to the elements and fresh air. The mango wood she uses is grown in the local coastal belt and for every mango tree harvested, 10 are re-planted in the local villages.

Loft Tour: The Cement Factory – LoftLife Magazine – The Loftstyle Guide to Life in the City To this day, Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill’s legendary live/work complex in Barcelona, Spain remains one of, if not the most impressive examples of adaptive reuse we’ve ever seen. It all started about 35 years ago when the controversial architect discovered an abandoned cement factory comprised of over 30 silos, underground galleries and huge engine rooms. He bought it and began renovation. This included defining the space by demolishing certain structures, cleaning cement, exposing previously concealed forms, and planting various greenery including eucalyptus, palms, olive trees and cypresses. Today, the factory has been successfully transformed into his personal home, as well as a multitude of offices, modeling and archival laboratories, a projection room, and a huge space known as ‘The Cathedral’, which serves as a venue for subsequent exhibitions, lectures, and concerts. The vast space exemplifies incredible restraint. Check out the full story of “The Cement Factory” here.

15 Elegant and Creative Ways to Maximize Space Under Your Stairs We’ve seen a lot of indoor arrangements where the space under the stairs is completely neglected. This usually happens because the owners fear not to overcrowd the living room or hallway. In this post we would like to present 15 creative and elegant ways on how to effectively use the space under your stairs without “damaging” your home’s appearance. In fact, we think the ideas below will help improve the overall design of the rooms where they are put to practice. If you are living in a small crib and feel the need for more space, you might consider improvising a bookcase, a home office or an entertaining area. We particularly like the cozy extendable bed in the first photo, which could turn out to be a good solution when receiving guests.

The Tangga House Singapore by Guz Architects The Tangga House Singapore by Guz Architects Email 104 Email The tropical nature of Singapore is one that should be embraced in architecture, with structures that make outdoor living central to their experience. The Sifter's Top 10 Homes of 2010 If you’re a regular reader of the Sifter you’re familiar with my real estate fascination. I love posting all types of homes. From the unique and interesting to the grand and opulent. The Biggest and Most Expensive Home Posted in 2010 This staggering 48,00 square foot mega-mansion in the Cayman Islands was listed at a jaw-dropping $59 million USD! The Best Use of Limited Space [500 sq ft] Architects Darrick Borowski and Danny Orenstein show us that it’s possible to live quite comfortably in 500 square feet (46 sq m). The Most Exotic Home Posted in 2010 Located in gorgeous Phuket, Thailand, this stunning property boasts over 8,000 square feet of interior space and over 8,500 square feet of outdoor terrace space as well! The Craziest Penthouse Posted in 2010 It’s not surprising that the craziest, most outlandish penthouse posted in 2010 would be in New York City. The Coolest Retrofit Property of 2010 It’s a 1965 Boeing 727 converted into a hotel room. The Most Unique Property of 2010

50 Most Strange and Unusual Buildings arround the World The world is full of beautiful strange and fantastic buildings that are the examples of amazing architecture. Architecture Photography brings this beauty to the world, and for this reason, architectural photography is as thrilling as it is heartwarming. In this roundup, we have compiled an amazing collection of some bizarre yet interesting buildings that are reflected through architectural photography. The UFO house in Sanjhih The Device to Root Out Evil Krzywy Dom Dom postawiony na glowie Anomaly Stata Center Container City 2, Leamouth, London Strong Children’s Museum The Ufo House Dancing House Blur Building Frank O. Un museo del futuro Stone house Library Parking Garage United States Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel Wonderworks – Pigeon Forge, TN Dan and the house View of the Luxor from The Strip Updside Down Building: City Hall, Tempe AZ Solar Furnace at Odeillo Font-Romeu, France Cube Houses Erwin Wurm: House attack Chapel-in-the-Rock Atomium Expo Zaragoza 2008, Pabellón de Aragón Eden Le Futuroscope Arrowhead

The Montecito Residence by Barton Myers The Montecito Residence by Barton Myers Barton Myers Associates have completed a new architectural masterwork on the coastal hills of Santa Barbara county, California. The Montecito Residence was carefully designed for this breezy sea-side environment, where coastal winds are the perfect natural air conditioner. BMA designed the home to feature sliding glass walls and windows, allowing the local breezes to cool the home on warmer summer days. It is constructed with exposed steel, glass, concrete and metal paneling that makes for a home as open to its environment as possible. The home features two separate wings, one for entertaining and the other for private retreat. 10 Most Popular Projects Presented in September 2011 Dear Freshome readers, it is time for us to draw a line and see who created what in the month of September. We are happy to see that each posts gets your appreciation expressed through voting, sharing, comments and relevant advice. We are certain you guys want to see the best of the best, so here are the 10 most popular posts presented in September 2011, according to your Facebook shares. Remember that by clicking on the pictures, you can see more photos and details about each project. #1. According to you Facebook shares, the top project presented in September pays tribute to …pets. #2. #3. #4. #5. #6. #7. #8. #9. #10.

before & after: trolley depot renovation It’s always been my dream to live in a home with airy, open rooms and lots of exposed bricks, so when this renovation project from Amy came across my desk, I was instantly smitten. Located in Atlanta, this building is about 100 years old and originally served as a trolley depot. Thankfully, Amy and her husband did a wonderful job preserving many of the original details while adding some modern touches that complement the overall aesthetic beautifully. Wonderful job, Amy! — Kate Have a Before & After you’d like to share? Read more about Amy’s renovation after the jump! Time: 1 year Cost: $500k Basic Steps: The basic steps we took to achieve the look were to preserve the original space as much as possible and use the existing lines (like the arched windows) in other elements, like the niche, and the arched doorway — even the arch of the armoire.

Sky Garden House I think one of the reasons that many are skeptical about environmental design is because they think its terribly complex and costly. It does take a bit more effort on the front end, but it's definitely not rocket science. This architecture by Guz Architects is a wonderfully developed minimalistic design with a curvilinear flare that really brings out the organic coverings. See more at Guz Architects Sarah Klassen/Haute Design: Architecture: Andersson-Wise Portfolio: Andersson-Wise / Part One: Stone Creek Camp I came across the work of this amazing studio a short while ago, and couldn't wait to share some of their projects. Thus, a brand new series has begun—starting with a well-planned, warm and woodsy lakeside home called Stone Creek Camp. Set into the sloping landscape in a very non-intrusive manner, this beautiful, remote, rustic and modern home welcomes with an intriguing entryway of stone and stacked wood pieces... The path you see leads to the three main areas—the main lodge, guest house and the master house. Studio Profile: Andersson-Wise is an award-winning architecture and design studio based in Austin, Texas.

Light Light's Sublime Levitating Lamps Posted by Ray | 30 Sep 2011 | Comments (9) Designer Angela Jansen of Design Academy Eindhoven recently collaborated with engineer Ger Jansen on a pair of skeuomorphic LED lamps that they're currently selling as Light Light. Their website knowingly notes that "It is uncommon for engineers to find good domestic applications for their technology... and it is likewise rare for designers of consumer objects to embrace cutting-edge technology wholeheartedly." Which, of course, is "perhaps what makes the cross-pollination of ideas between Angela Jansen and Ger Jansen so remarkable." The Light Light series creates an incredible visual conversation piece. Bombastic copy aside, the products speak for themselves. Some assembly required (illustrated below, not above): In short, Light Light is (the first?) Again, per the designers: "...this handcrafted lamp can be dimmed but never ignored. Any way you slice it, Light Light is a pretty sweet: More videos here.

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