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Michael Deal ◊ Graphic Design

Michael Deal ◊ Graphic Design
Ongoing study of Beatles through infographics, much of which is based on secondary sources such as sales statistics, biographies, recording session notes, sheet music, and raw audio readings. This graphic traces songwriting contributions by different band members (data based on authorial attributions quantified by William J. Dowlding in the book Beatlesongs Longwinded notes: Color patterns offer clues about the band's gradual fracturing as each member became more independent. Red stalks (signifying jointly written songs) decrease in the second half of the timeline; the split-color bars give way to solid bars of a single color. George Harrison also began to compose more music as he matured as a songwriter, shown by the increase in green bars (Lennon and McCartney's lack of support through Harrison's development is often cited as a factor contributing to the band's eventual breakup). Beatles lyrics contain a number of references to their own previous songs.

http://www.mikemake.com/Charting-the-Beatles

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Research: Lev Manovich Coins the Term 'Media Visualization' New media theorist Lev Manovich just released a new text, titled What is Visualization? [manovich.net]. One might first wonder if such a question is not too... obvious, but in the light of the contentious discussion about the tension between artistic and scientific representations of data, and whether data art should be called visualization at all, it is always worth covering the basics. The text is quite substantial, so you might want to wait for some quiet time to dive into it. The main arguments in the text focus around distinguishing information visualization, scientific visualization and information design. In addition, Lev proposes a new term, "media visualization", for those visual representations that do not reduce data into topology and geometry, but instead uses techniques to reorganize data into a new visual representation that preserves its original form.

Beatles Unknown Chord Mystery Solved It’s the most famous chord in rock 'n' roll, an instantly recognizable twang rolling through the open strings on George Harrison’s 12-string Rickenbacker. It evokes a Pavlovian response from music fans as they sing along to the refrain that follows: "It’s been a hard day’s nightAnd I’ve been working like a dog" The opening chord to "A Hard Day’s Night" is also famous because, for 40 years, no one quite knew exactly what chord Harrison was playing. There were theories aplenty and musicians, scholars and amateur guitar players all gave it a try, but it took a Dalhousie mathematician to figure out the exact formula.

The Made Shop TWENTY TEN // Linear Calendar Fullscreen TWENTY TEN // Linear Month Calendar Poster. Print For Sale Audio Analysis of the Beatles Multitrack Masters While digging through Usenet, I stumbled on these three unidentified tracks that pick apart three of the Beatles' original multitrack masters, isolating and highlighting pieces from "She's Leaving Home," "A Day in the Life," and "Come Together." It's an astounding, and very listenable, glimpse into their recording process. Update: Removed the downloads, see update below. Multitrack Analysis of She's Leaving HomeMultitrack Analysis of A Day In the LifeMultitrack Analysis of Come Together Datasets on Datavisualization Wikileaks US Embassy Cables 29 Nov 2010 Datasets Infographic, Politics Wikileaks began on Sunday November 28th publishing 251,287 leaked United States embassy cables, the largest set of confidential documents ever to be released into the public domain.

John Lennon: Scumbag Written by: Lennon-Ono-ZappaRecorded: 6 June 1971Producers: John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Phil Spector Released: 15 September 1972 (UK), 12 June 1972 (US) John Lennon: vocals, electric guitarYoko Ono: vocals Frank Zappa: vocals, electric guitar Mark Volman: vocals Howard Kaylan: vocals Ian Underwood: vocals, woodwind, keyboards Bob Harris: vocals, keyboards Jim Pons: vocals, bass guitar Don Preston: Minimoog Aynsley Dunbar: drums 15 examples Data Visualization is a method of presenting information in a graphical form. Good data visualization should appear as if it is a work of art. This intrigues the viewer and draws them in so that they can further investigate the data and info that the graphic represents. In this post there are 15 stunning examples of Data Visualization that are true works of art. Click on the title or image for a larger view of each visualization. The Strengths of Nations

5 Best Data Visualization Projects of the Year – 2009 It was a huge year for data. There's no denying it. Data is about to explode. Applications sprung up left and right that help you understand your data - your Web traffic, your finances, and your life. There are now online marketplaces that sell data as files or via API. Philip Goldberg: Beatles in India: The Retreat That Reverberates Across the Universe Forty five years ago, the Beatles were settling into the ashram of their new guru, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, in Rishikesh, India. The news coverage was nonstop and global, as it had been six months earlier when the lads first met Maharishi and became public advocates for his Transcendental Meditation technique. It would have been easy at the time to dismiss the media frenzy as just another pop culture craze. But reporters knew this was different. Why would four young, bright, fun-loving youngsters, wealthy beyond imagining, able to go anywhere and do anything, choose to hunker down in an austere, vegetarian, non-air-conditioned compound in the Himalayan foothills and spend large chunks of time each day with their eyes closed?

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